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CatBird

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Posts posted by CatBird

  1. Pricey, but should work forever! Each are hand made for your desired voltage. I have an 84volt car and could not find anything that would charger all of my (7) 12v Deep Cycle batteries at the same time. Small footprint 6W x 9L and 7h. 

    I was impressed that the Quick Charge Company, Ray (president) called and asked me specifics about our car and my requirements for the environment where the car usually resides and hookup so he could customize it for my car! 

    I reached out to the moderator (Vintage Electric Cars, Facebook) who has 3 electric cars, and he has two of these chargers and work flawlessly.  So I followed his recommendation.

    Each charger can be made for 12V, 24V, 36V, 48V, 64V, 72V, 84V (Mine!), 96V, 120V in varying degrees of amperage.

    https://store11391930.ecwid.com/On-Board-Chargers-Select-A-Charge-p83141753

  2. Our garage was designed for cars. I measured a 19 foot Cadillac (mostly 1950s) about three feet beyond the tail end of the car making 23 feet, then a 3 foot wide tool benches and 4 feet to walk around with a rolling table and room to work on the cars. 30 feet total!


    Plenty of room about 15 feet (sideways) for more tool cabinets and storage. Four 12 foot wide roll up doors. 15 wide x 4 figured a 60 foot width. one of the open bays (no lifts) gave plenty of room to install a bathroom.

     

    Hmm, height? How high where I could safely raise a car with the hood open. 14 foot eaves and a peak of 16 feet in the middle. Chain hoist.

    Two four post lifts (9,000 pounds and extended platform) since we are always hunting parts needed and car can sit on one lift and the other lift kept clear. 

    220v outlets for air compressor and welders. One outlet near the roll up door opening so I can easily weld outside. 3 ton HVAC system, a few ceiling fans. Plenty of LED lighting, additional over each tool bench. Media blast cabinet. Chairs for the wife. Outside LED floodlights.

    Started with a few stakes and strings. More pictures later.
     

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    • Like 3
  3. I have several cars that either have carbide/prestolite/kerosene head and tail lights. I want to set up modern LED lights where I can see at night and people coming up from behind me can see ME!

    Please recommend a kit that I can install good lights, turn indicators, and a horn would be great! I do have 12v systems in most of our cars.

    Bill

  4. 5 minutes ago, 8E45E said:

    It might be 'alright' as long as it wasn't in the title of this thread.

     

    The issue myself and others have here with his name being wrongly associated as being dishonest lumps this thread with other threads that truly are warnings and heads-up about dishonest individuals who actually are scammers on places like Ebay, et al.  The title paints an improper impression of a highly respected vintage vehicle vendor who does impeccable work.  

     

    Craig

     

    I agree. The only way to find him was the seller (who died) and son who only knew the nickname. Probably an "in" name by people who knew him, like "good 'ol boys" who make up names for each other and outsiders miss the point.

    So, now I know his real name, I will use that and laugh along with the people who knew him and used that LTT name. Yes, I have heard the "comments" from quite a few people, if you knew this man, he probably was fine with the nickname. In any event he has retired and his name is now relegated to anecdotes. The "in crowd" who paid his price and have magnificent upholstery and whether they may still "Leif the Thief" as part of the "In" jokes. Many people will never understand and again, so what?

    It is obvious that the crooks and scammers will always be a part of our hobby, and we can drill them and hang them out to dry. 

    My other Thomas (1908) has also magnificent trimming. but, sadly I will never know the craftsman as his info was lost in the past along with Wolfgang Gawor who restored my 1908. 

    1908 Thomas Flyer-03 (Large).jpg

    1908 Thomas Flyer-02 (Large).jpg

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    • Like 2
  5. Thank you all for your replies. I thought that "Leif the Thief" was a kindly, fond familiar nickname and was not to be meant derogatory. Since this is that I now his name is Lief Drexler, and may use that name, or "Lief the Thief" which meant that his prices were astronomical. So what?

    He did a magnificent job on my 1910 Thomas, seats, carpet, top and side curtains. The work is exquisite. I am proud that Lief did the work, and will use his Leif Drexler in credentials when showing. A good friend has a 1908 Lozier and Lief did his upholstery. Also magnificent! You sure get what you pay for when you hire the best. 

    My car was a trailer queen for 15-20 years. I have had it redone for touring. So is the Lozier I mentioned. Our cars get driven.

    12 hours ago, C Carl said:

    Hey Bill

    Do you have any pictures of that incomparably magnificent monster flying it’s sidecurtains ? Thanks to you if you can show us !     -   Carl 

     

    P.S. I promise I will do this to the curtained car if you give me something to work with 🤗.

     

     

     

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    Carl, I may not even replace the windshield as I like it open, not too likely to install the side curtains, but you are making me curious as to how it would look buttoned up!

  6. It is thrilling I got a call from a man who is researching about a Marmon 48 Two seater. Marmon only built about 350 48 Marmons and only three were speedsters. According to the Marmon Owners Club, our 1913 Marmon, by our serial number, was the only Marmon speedster made in 1913. 

     

    Possible previous owner of our 1913 Marmon. Researching. Please let us know if you have any information or pictures. She is driving a Marmon two seater that looks a great deal as our car!
     
    From a source who is researching for a book

    "Edith Mortimer in her Marmon 48 – only known image are two variants on this – note how straight-legged she is – & she was 5 foot 8 ins tall.

    The image below is from a syndicated newspaper story which ran in August 1919. (She was in an accident that killed someone)

    "The trial was in March 1919, five months after the second accident (that two individuals were also killed) in October 1918. Edith did NOT drive the Marmon after the October 1918 accident so the newspapers must have had this image in stock from months or even years earlier. She drove it from March 1915 to October 1918.

    "In June, 1919, three months after the trial, Edith married an Italian nobleman and became Countess di Zoppola. The couple lived in Europe from 1919 – 1923, partly to escape intrusive attention from the American press."

    Notice the car in the picture has the same cowl shape, left hand drive, handbrake and the gearshift is ours. The seat is farther back than most brass cars. It fits me perfectly and she, at 5'8", had a little stretch as in her picture.

    I am aware that the car in the picture shows a right hand door. There is no indication of same on our car, but our car was the result of a major restoration, but closely done as it was made originally made.


     

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    • Like 2
  7. There is a fascinating compilation about Metrinch. One side thinks they will not, cannot, work as well as a particular socket designed for a particular bolt. As best I can tell this side has not used Metrinch and is extrapolating from previous concepts.

    Others have used Metrinch and see how well they work. I have a set and are very pleased with how well they work. 

    I appreciate both opinions.

    However I am going for a ride, and carrying my Metrinch and a few other tools. The weather is beautiful. 65 degrees and sunny. Good convertible weather getting on my Outback clothes. Trying to decide if I want to put on my windshield on my Thomas Flyer.

    Suggest that everyone do the same! Lets enjoy some breeze. If anyone in Atlanta who would like to go for a ride, come on! Share the fun. It can hold five people, but a bit windy.

    BTW I am looking for a good monocle windshield for my 1913 Marmon Speedster? 

     

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  8. 12 hours ago, erichill said:

    Beautiful car. Makes me miss my '60 Caddy though it was nowhere near the beauty of yours.  Is that a stock color?

     Not a stock color as far as I know. The data plate says that it was champaign(?). It was painted red by a previous owner. To me there is nothing like a red Cadillac convertible. I drive it often.

    We do also have a '60, Carrara green and white leather buckets. I like the 1959, brash and bold. The 1960 is cool and serene like Grace Kelly. The car was made for a GM Executive and the color was in the advertising for Cadillac in 1960. Can't prove that ours is the same in the pictures, but looks the same.

    I love Cadillacs!

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    • Like 6
  9. On 3/21/2021 at 5:34 AM, Bush Mechanic said:

    The metrinch sockets have a curved face between each pair of internal 'points'. This puts the turning force pressure further away from the corners of the nut, and allows small variations in nut sizes to be accomodated. They also have less tendency to mark the nuts. Personally, I only seem to use them for Whitworth, but that's just my habit, I guess. Old dog, new tricks. I bought them when my hex drive Whitworth set was stolen.

    Thanks, Bush. Appreciate that you understand these wrenches. They are NOT a sloppy fit nor gimmick for SAE and Metric. Quality tools IMHO.

    Interesting they fit Whitworth. I had a 1954 Vincent Black Shadow motorcycle "Belch Fire V twin" it had Whitworth. I have classic cars from 1903 to 1960 and a few 2016 for daily drivers. These wrenches fit everything and are having my goto box when touring.

    • Like 1
  10. These have been around since 1993. A Cadillac friend has been using them since 1995. I used his tool set and am surprised by the quality.  $200 is not cheap, and I tend to cheap, except when buying cars!

    The company has longevity. I bought these on Amazon for their outstanding return policy. Free shipping back to the seller.  I am very happy with these tools, and I think that you will do the same. Don't let your preconceptions deter you. They work!

    Suggest that you read the attached Amazon ad and read the reviews. The tools have a very different opening shape. They easily fit SAE and Metric. I have been using them on a variety of nuts and bolts, and they work beautifully! 

     

    See the Youtube review.
    Metrinch Review

  11. We have a few cars :) Some are SAE and some are Metric. I seem too often grab the wrong size socket. Just got a set of Metrinch.

    Each wrench and socket will work on SAE OR  Metric (even rounded off) bolts. Becoming my go-to toolbox!

    https://www.amazon.com/Metrinch-Combo-Spanner-Socket-Wrench/dp/B000WR3JUO/ref=asc_df_B000WR3JUO/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=309813767497&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=7756132433841522820&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9010804&hvtargid=pla-568899462894&psc=1

    Youtube Metrinch Review

    • Like 1
  12. Rusty, thank you for the video! I understand, now. It has to do with the spider gear and how the differential works! I may or not install a driveshaft brake. 

    Thank you, Also joe for you both hanging in there to let me understand!

  13. Quote

     The problem with a driveshaft brake is that holding any one of the three shafts connected to the differential still allows the other two to turn, unless an outside force (friction between the tire and the ground) prevents it.



    Yes and understood, so the driveshaft brake can only stop one of the three shafts. Would that be the shaft with the driven (right) wheel, only? Sorry, I am still stuck on this despite evidence to the contrary. Since the driveshaft only drives the right rear wheel, how could it affect the left rear wheel?

    Certainly the friction with the brake shoes and the brake drum, and then transmitted to the ground, stops the car. Realize that most cars up until the mid-twenties only had rear brakes, so the brakes need to be in perfect order at all times. 

     

    The disk brake addition is to help stop a heavy car when you were in mountainous areas and riding the brakes would overheat them causing friction to be lost.

    Of course of gearing down is the best idea. Except when, I think it was Pierce, in the early '30s had free wheeling and could not gear them down.

  14. Rusty, thanks for the explanation. It helps. My original question was when I spun the rear tire(s) on my 1957 Chevy from revving the engine and dropping the clutch, only one black mark came from my right rear wheel. This indicated to me that the left rear wheel was not being driven by the driveshaft. Following this logic was that the left rear wheel was free-wheeling. So how could the driveshaft stop both wheels. Somehow my logic is flawed? I am missing the point?


    Of course this was in the days before limited slip.

    I appreciate your knowledge as you have great posts that I have followed and implemented!

    I was thinking about the brakes on my Pierce, which has only two brakes on the rear wheels. Maybe going disk on the driveshaft as many of my touring buddies are doing this. From your logic and my friends, additional disk braking is useful in mountainous roads. Of course gearing down certainly helps! 

    Of course having the original brakes in proper adjustment is paramount! As long as the rear wheels can lock up, that is all you can have.

  15. On 3/8/2021 at 8:42 PM, Rusty_OToole said:

    Some early cars had the service brake on the driveshaft notably Ford Model T. One drawback was that if one back wheel slipped on ice or mud  it could spin backwards while the opposite wheel spun forwards resulting in no braking.

     

    Rusty, trying to understand. The Model T brake pedal tightens a band in the transmission, stopping effectively stopping the driveshaft, so that the rear drive wheel stops, not spins, and the other wheel freewheels ....... Please explain. Of course the handbrake stops each rear wheel.

    So, that, a disk brake on the driveshaft can only affect the driven wheel, not the freewheeling other wheel. Only a driveshaft disk brake could only stop both rear wheels if there was a solid rear axle. When you turn a corner, the outer wheel has to turn faster than the inner wheel.

  16. 1 hour ago, Bob Roller said:

    Because it continued on and on with few or no improvements.

    I have a friend who owned a 1919 Chevrolet that has a water pump

    and oil pump PLUS a 3 speed transmission.It may have had a

    distributor as well. 

    Yes. You are right! Henry Ford had a great idea, innovative methods and put America on wheels. But to me, He stagnated, perhaps more or less, 1915 and did not progress with new technology and the Model T was outmoded as you mentioned. 

    There was a continuing American love affair with the Model T that had momentum, but at some point this love affair became "tired."  Even though there is still a few die-hard fans, myself among them that cherish the mystique of the Model T.

    I am fortunate that we live within a mile of Stone Mountain Park. We have over 15 miles of paved road, wonderful sites to enjoy and there is a 25mph speed limit, but I would not spend time on regular surface roads in a Model T. 

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