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Taylormade

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Everything posted by Taylormade

  1. Back at Ed's we decided to remove the motor and get it over to the rebuilder's shop. Probably a crazy idea considering it was just Ed and I doing all the work, but we went at it. First we removed the head. Inside didn't look too bad, but ridges in the bores indicate new pistons are in order. The valves looked pretty good. I've got my fingers crossed that the bottom end won't look too bad. Loosening up the motor, We found the front mount was not attached to the motor by any mechanical means. The front mount that bolts to the frame has a separate part with a rubber pad vulcanized to it
  2. Not much progress for the last few weeks. I've been involved in the tedious process of stripping the seats down to the springs, cleaning off the rust - mostly surface, and not too bad - and painting everything. I also got the rust off the front seat frame and got that painted. Yesterday I made another 2 and a half hour jaunt to central Missouri to help Ed with the body on the DL. When I arrived he had the other front fender nearly finished and it's looking good. We removed the last bolts holding the body to the frame. It's an interesting mounting method, with two large bolts
  3. The enter button problem seems to be related to Explorer. As soon as I went to Mozilla Firefox the problem stopped.
  4. It's been a dismal week in Southern Illinois. it just keeps raining - day after day. I was planning to give my finished fender a quick sandblasting to even things out and then lay on a coat of epoxy primer, but the rain and humidity make it impossible to do either. Plus the constant rain is just plain depressing - and the forcast is for more of it, all week through the holiday. I find myself sitting in the workshop staring at things that need to be done and then doing absolutely nothing. I did manage to get all my removed parts sorted, labeled and up on shelves. I went through everything,
  5. <quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>We won't know the true extent of the body damage until we get the paint off. The lower portion below the door sills definitely has to be replaced. The wheel weels a a little crusty, but I'm hoping they are okay. From what I can see from inside the body, the cowl may be okay. The upper body, rear section and doors look very good. An interesting thing about the body construction of the 32 is that it precedes hot rod practice - the body is actually channeled over the frame. The channel then bolts to the SIDE
  6. In this case the fender braces were definitely welded on. No room for rivets where the top of the brace meets the fender and the original factory spot welds could still bee seen where the brace was attached around the headlight mounting holes. I knew the collision damage was going to be a job, but I didn't see all the rust issues and small dents coming. The fenders looked pretty good from the damage back (70 percent of the fender) until the paint came off. Then the true condition of the metal became apparent. I was driving the car forty-five years ago and it was full of bondo and fiberglas
  7. A long 16 hour day at Ed’s shop on Friday. Reality is beginning to set in on this restoration. It took as long as the estimate to do all four fenders to get the driver’s side front fender finished. Needless to say, my original budget is shot all to heck. After working out the major damage on the front fenders, Ed removed them for the finish work. He discovered that the fenders are not riveted on as we previously suspected and that what appeared to be rivet heads were domes stamped into the fenders to clear rivets in the frame. Here you can see them from the underside of the cleaned
  8. As you can probably tell from my lack of posting, not much has happened on the restoration over the last few days. I was involved in the 48 Hour Film Project over the weekend where teams make a complete 4 to 7 minute dramatic film in 48 hours. I got three hours sleep over the 48 hours, so I wasn't really able to concentrate my attentions on the Dodge. I was planning to visit Ed tomorrow, but work got in the way and now it's a Friday visit. The good news- talking to Ed on the phone and he has both front fenders off the frame and nearly finished. On Friday he promises all four fenders done,
  9. Check post #129. I have a close-up photo of one of the oiling holes circled in red.
  10. According to their website and in talking to their people, they specalize in antique and special interest auto pumps. The person on the phone seemed unfazed by my pump. He said they had several on the shelf they could rebuild and exchange, but I preferred to have my original (maybe) pump rebuilt and that was no problem. Like I said, I'll show you the results when it gets back.
  11. Thanks, Phil, I'll check it out. I like the caps, also.
  12. I'm going to send my water pump to: Flying Dutchman Pump Rebuilders 200 Davis Creek Road Selma, OR 97538 They quoted me $95 for a total rebuild with a 24 month warrenty. They also use a modern seal rather than the style old packing, although you can't tell from looking at the pump. I'll show you how it comes out when I get it back - supposedly a week or less turn-around.
  13. <quickprintreadystate style="display: none;"></quickprintreadystate>And notice the entire dash is wood-grained in the brochure illustration instead of the correct wood-grained top and black bottom.
  14. That's not to say that the gold has yellowed and become more gold over the years, but both Phil and my car have the same shade of gold instruments. But then, we both have the same shade of "tan" upholstery - that used to be brown.
  15. I'm not sure. You'll have to contact him - he's a real nice guy.
  16. I'm assuming it is a wrench that has very thin sides to be able to slip into the narrow opening and still turn. I may have to grind something down to fit.
  17. I'm going with: AER 16574 S. Baver Road Grand Ledge, MI 48837 I talked to owner Jason Smith, who does all the work himself. He completely rebuilds the electrics, powdercoats the unit in the correct semi-gloss black finish, replates anything that was originally plated, and installs new Delco labels - the metal ovals, not sure of the correct terminology - with correct stamped numbers. He charges $350 per unit. He told me that about the only thing remaining from the original unit are the exterior metal pieces. He specializes in rare and antique units. I'm not sure if the end pieces are pot meta
  18. If I clean up the threads I can pretty well finger tighten them to where they'll just need a half turn or so more to finish the job. I always hate to modify things - it seems to come back and haunt me in ways I never saw coming.
  19. I have a few questions about my water pump for all the experts out there. it seems like a very simple unit. I'd like to rebuild it, if possible. I have some pretty severe movement in the shaft fore and aft. You can see the extent of the movement in these side-by-side shots. Since the fan mount and the belt pully are both pinned to the shaft and can't move along the shaft, the only thing that would cause this movement is the impeller being too far toward the rear of the shaft. Or am I mistaken about this? I looks like it's on about right and pushing it further onto the shaft would lea
  20. I spent yesterday at Ed's shop working on the DL. I got a lot done, but none of it is very visual. Since the body is coming off the frame I realized it was time to disconnect everything that would prvent lift-off. There turned out to be a lot of things attached to the body and frame. First I tackled the wiring. After getting a good look at it, I'm amazed this car didn't turn into a rolling fireball at some point in its life. Most of the original wiring still existed in place, but little of it was being used. Over the years, all of the wiring to the lights and ignition had been replaced with
  21. Forum member RSayak asked for some information on converting his coupe to sidemounts. It turns out it's a bit more complicated than grafting a couple of wheelwells onto the fenders. Along with the wheelwells there is a brace that helps support the well and the tire and also provides a mount for the rod that extends up from the fender to hold the clamp for the tire. Here is the configuration from the underside of the fender. And from the top. As you can see a brace comes off the upright support rod, passes through the body and bolts onto an inner support in the cowl. This inner su
  22. Did some work on the front seat, stripping off the horrible black vinyl and getting it ready for the new upholstery. The metal seat frame looked pretty good - some surface rust on the inside back, but easily removed and repainted. The bottom wood frame didn't fare so well. The fire frrom the tailpipe that burned a hole in the floorboard also got to the seat. Nothing too serious, but ugly just the same. Since I have all the woodworking tools I need: bandsaw, router, sanders, I may just make a new frame. The cardboard/fiber insert around the top of the seat is pretty torn up, but I assume y
  23. Thanks for all the kind words - and help - on this thread. My new hood top sections arrived from Canada in good shape. Thanks again RSayak! This will really help fix the hood area where a giant slab of ice slide off Phil's roof onto the car decades ago. The old... And the new... Ed will still have to work on the lower hood section on the driver's side, but not having to deal with the top will save time and money. I also got my repo tail light stalk from Verdonnes. It's a very nice casting, and the polished aluminium means I don't have to go through the hassle of trying to
  24. A slow slog for the last week. It's been raining here almost every day for the last month. My trip to Ed's shop was delayed as he had to finish an aluminium airplane tail for a client in Kansas. Now it looks like he will have my fenders ready next Friday and we'll take the body off for the rust repair then. I understand, but I was revved up to go yesterday and it was a disappointment to say the least. Crin is working on the woodgraining and I'm removing the old seat material and cleaning and painting the seat springs. One of the most boring and unexciting jobs in recorded history. I'm al
  25. Check Crin's site out. He takes pictures of all his customer's projects as he works on them. I live very close, so I can go over and see how things are progressing, but for his out of town customers it's a perfect way to keep up on progress on their cars. I also want to point out that although my pictures make this process look easy - it's not. it's comparable to handing someone a paintbrush, paints and canvas and expecting them to produce a masterpiece. I could tell at first glance that it had taken years of practice for Crin to be so assured in his technique. That's why I used him ins
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