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Taylormade

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Everything posted by Taylormade

  1. Did anyone catch tonight’s “Chasing Classic Cars?” Wayne was driving a 1932 Packard and in a traveling shot from the camera truck he was tooling down the road when the front driver’s side tire hit a big rut in the road. The front end immediately went into a classic death wobble as the car drove out of frame. It looked like he was lucky he didn’t lose control. They cut away fairly quickly, but the was no doubt the front end was all over the road.
  2. On my 32 DL there is a rubber pad on a crossmember just in front of the bellhousing, but the engine/trans is not attached to the pad, they just rest on it. There is a mount that attaches to the transmission near the rear of the transmission. This is a rubber mount. I see that your bellhousing has no “arms” to attach it to the frame, so your setup must be similar to mine. My car also has a half leaf spring that runs from the trans to the frame to prevent the motor/trans from twisting too much on the Floating Power rubber mounts. My concern is that if your front motor mount is the standard
  3. Does the new trans clear the X-frame? How are you planning to mount the trans since the Floating Power setup will be different? Engine and trans looks terrific.
  4. They went from Model As to 34 Fords to Studebaker trucks.
  5. This is the type of buggy I rode in back in 1952 when we first visited Silver Lake. I took these shots a few years ago when they had the car out on display. These are screenshots from 8mm movies we took in the late fifties of our Ford dune buggy at our cottage. I thought it was a 37, but it was a 38 based on these pictures. Sorry for the poor quality, but you get the idea. Bus seats, no seatbelts, we drove around the dunes like maniacs - I guess I'm lucky to be alive. That's me waving from the front passenger seat in the third photo and m
  6. ‘These folks have run what we always called “dune buggies” for years on the dunes on Silver Lake in Michigan. They ran 34 Fords back in the early fifties when I was a kid. They only held five people and as business increased and the state restricted driving on the dunes, they switched to trucks with three or four rows of seats to take many more customers on each ride. We had two buggies ourselves, a 37 Ford phaeton and a 46 Mercury wagon. All the doors and roofs were removed and grab rails installed. The wheel rims were cut in half and a 12 band was welded in. The tires were stretched ov
  7. Ah, well, hopes dashed again. Time to go to the old standby - innovation. Let’s see if I can come up with some way to make three of these things.
  8. Gee, what a shock. Pretty much nothing fits from 31 or 33. Some mechanical stuff, but little things like this are always a no go. Is that 32 you found some parts foe me still around?
  9. I'm putting in my windows and discovered I'm missing a few small parts. This is for my 1932 Dodge Brothers DL sedan, but I assume these were used on many other cars. They are the little rollers that prevent the window glass from rattling. I have one and need three more. They were apparently only used on the front window glass, one outside, one inside just below the window opening. I also assume they had a rubber roller over the steel shaft - mine is long gone. If anyone has any extras or knows of a source, let me know. Here is what they look like. Tha
  10. I'm putting in my windows and discovered I'm missing a few small parts. This is for my 1932 Dodge Brothers DL sedan, but I assume these were used on many other cars. Not sure what these are called, but they are the little rollers that prevent the window glass from rattling. I have one and need three more. They were apparently only used on the front window glass, one outside, one inside just below the window opening. I also assume they had a rubber roller over the steel shaft - mine is long gone. If anyone has any extras or knows of a source, let me know. Here is what they loo
  11. I'm putting in my windows and discovered I'm missing a few small parts. This is for my 1932 Dodge Brothers DL sedan, but I assume these were used on many other cars. They are the little rollers that prevent the window glass from rattling. I have one and need three more. They were apparently only used on the front window glass, one outside, one inside just below the window opening. I also assume they had a rubber roller over the steel shaft - mine is long gone. If anyone has any extras or knows of a source, let me know. Here is what they look like. Tha
  12. From the side the car looks okay, but that front view is just plain ugly. The independent front suspension may be innovative, but the lack of visual frame rails makes it look like someone sawed off the front of the car. That, combined with a truly uninspired radiator shell, takes the front down to economy car status. Maybe a front bumper, if there was one, would help, but I doubt it. About the only attractive view of this car, in my opinion, is the rear, as I like the squat rear curve of the body and the supports for the trunk. Just my opinion and I’m sure many might disagree.
  13. I keep forgetting this isn’t the original motor in your car. Glad things worked out so well.
  14. On a 32 DL you can’t install the bellhousing after the flywheel is installed. The locating pins hang the bellhousing up. I had to install the bellhousing, then slide the flywheel up and bolt it in place. It’s a real pain as the bolt pattern will only allow the flywheel to fit in one position. Getting it up inside the bellhousing, rotating it to the correct orientation and getting the bolts into the holes is a task that can try men’s souls. Then I put the clutch disk and pressure plate in place, holding the disk in position and centering it with a spare pinion shaft from an extra trans. I
  15. I thought you might spot that keiser31. Thought it might be a 32 when I first saw it.
  16. If you are speaking of the accelerator linkage - gas pedal to carburetor- I have detailed photos of that. I would need to know what type carburetor you are using. The first linkage is attached to the body and pivots when the gas pedal is depressed. This, in turn, pushes a rod attached to the carb forward, opening the throttle butterfly to accelerate. A spring attached to the rod pulls the rod back when you let off the accelerator. If this is what you’re talking about, let me know and I’ll post pictures. Let us see some pictures of your car - 32s are somewhat rare.
  17. Could it be part of a door mechanism?
  18. The fact that it is on rollers and possibly couldn’t be backed out of the building under it’s own power gives me some pause, but, based on the failure to even clean the dust off the car, it may simply indicate the owner was too lazy to take the roadster off the rollers. I would love to own this car and if I owned it I would clean it up, get it running and stopping, and wait for the day when I could paint the metallic green fenders something more reasonable. I don’t think this was a smoking deal in today’s market, but the new owner probably didn’t get robbed.
  19. I would be curious what would happen if you got a pressure washer nozzle in there and gave that area a good blast. It might not do a darn thing, but I used that method with my 48 Plymouth flathead and it worked wonders. I had to do some poking and scraping with a metal rod, but once the surface broke up a bit, the water pressure began blowing the scale off.
  20. Working on the steering box. Not very visual when it comes to photos. I also put the taillight together and just got my resorted temp and fuel guages ready to put back in the instrument panel. Super cold here at the moment which makes working in the garage almost impossible. Thanks for thinking about me - still plugging along.
  21. I mentioned in an early post that the first thing I was assuming you’d address was the headlights. They may be bright as is, but they are a real distraction. Still, nothing can really take away from the looks of that car.
  22. That is so much better looking than the one I was trying to look at for you in central Illinois. I like the styling of the early thirties models much better than some of the later ones. You were right to wait - and man did it pay off! Just a beautiful car from every angle.
  23. Love it. I assume one of the first items on your list is addressing the headlights. I’m glad you finally found one that you liked and could buy. I think this was a better choice than the one I tried to help you with.
  24. This particular site is dedicated to original automobiles, with the possible exception of the modified category in the Buick section, and when that’s what I want to talk or read about I come here. When it comes to rods, I head for the HAMB. I enjoy both and respect that both sites try to keep to their original purpose. I don’t think it’s too much to ask that we do the same. Not that this thread is a big deal or somehow wrong, but it’s a subject that’s been done to death, with the same answers, opinions and rationale. There are obviously a group of strict purists on both sides and then a l
  25. My 1932 Dodge Brothers DL sedan has the same type of brake lines as your Plymouth. Your brake cylinders accept modern fittings. I replaced all the brake lines on my car with double flared Cunifer copper-nickel tubing. It has a coppery appearance, is very easy to bend and has an very high pressure rating. Old copper lines tend to become brittle with use and vibration. Cunifer looks original and you will have a comfortable feeling of safety and peace of mind.
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