Scott Bonesteel

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Everything posted by Scott Bonesteel

  1. Chris--Maybe this will help. These pictures are from the inside passenger door of a 33 Plymouth convertible coupe, the one that provided the window frames I sent you. The top is connected with two round-head screws as shown in your diagram. Although the inside door panel has been cut away, you can see the remnants of what looks like two rivets, one on each of the outside ribs of the supporting piece, that look like they were installed about 1/2" above where the cut is, at the door panel bead. Looking for the inside door panel but can't seem to find it. SMB
  2. KCL is right, what you see in the photos that looks like sheet metal is actually a thick felt strip that is tacked to the plywood and folded over the corner where it drops into the sheet metal floor to stop squeaks and probably wind-proof the seam. Will send you some measurements and close up photos this weekend. SMB
  3. Then again, I have to think back to when I bought my first 34 Plymouth, a 34 PE 4-door sedan, in 1973. Nobody wanted it because it wasn't a 34 Ford. Didn't matter that it was dual-sidemount, trunk rack, dual horn equipped (and all of it still there). The 34 PE convertible I am building now is built from the remnants of 3 separate cars which 'serious restorers' didn't want because they were too far gone (attached is a photo of one of them, which contributed its top irons, rumble seat lid, etc.). In short, while I agree with the criticisms of somebody who chops up and then cobbles together what was a nice restorable or otherwise rare car with no sense whatsoever of history, proportion or style, some of those are available because those of us 'serious' collectors didn't see fit to save them. Not everybody can afford a matching numbers 69 Z-28 or a 48 Packard Custom 8 convertible (both of which I love, by the way). Let's all give thanks that at least these guys (or girls) are in a hobby/pastime that is generally worthwhile and certainly better than what a lot of folks spend their time and money on. OK, I'm off my soap box... . SMB
  4. Or as a good friend of mine once told my wife, "that is not too many cars, just not enough garage...". Now THAT is a good friend.
  5. Steve--Here are a couple of photos of the seat tracks and floorboard in my 34 PE convertible, which is an early production model (it has the early style grille shell). All of this stuff is original from the factory and I believe should be the same in your PD. Note the support blocks mounted on the underside of the floorboard. There is another, tapered wood block (some kind of hardwood, looks like oak) between the tracks and the floorboard. The tracks themselves mount directly to the underside of the seat frame. The two seat tracks are connected to one another by a piece of sheet metal 'channel' with a hole in each end so that the two tracks work in unison even though there is only a hand control on the driver side. I have seen 3 different types of handles, one just a one-piece forged steel handle, another one with the nickel 'knob' insert like is shown in the pictures, and a third one as described above, with a nickel 'ring' for a handle. Working during the week but this Saturday or Sunday I will be working on my 34 and will take a couple of more detailed photos and send them your way. I do have a complete set as a 'spare' which I will also shoot you a photo of. Not particularly interested in parting with it but would be interested in a trade for any convertible-specific parts you might have. Looking in particular for a top piece (where the rear view mirror attaches) of the windshield frame and the pivot bracket (the cast piece that rivets on to the channel steel for the B-pillar and has a hole for the large bolt to pass through that the top irons pivot on). However, will consider any 33-34 convertible parts you might have to trade. Hope this helps. SMB
  6. OK, did some digging in 'Group 21', the section of the parts books dealing with the transmission. Checked my 34 Dodge and Plymouth books, as well as the 33 Dodge and Plymouth 'Master Parts Lists'. All of them agree: 33-34 Dodge and Plymouth all used the same gaskets, the large one for the rear is #600356 and the smaller one to the front (which the books refer to as 'Gearshift Rail Cover Gasket, Front') is #601567. The ones on that 'Best Gasket' website look about right, nice resource. Confirmed my 34 has a two-piece cover, still looking to see if I can find a spare 34 box or cover. SMB
  7. Let me check, I might have one. If I have one it would be a 34, I will check my parts books to see if it is the same. P.S. Post some pics of your convertible coupe, love to exchange info with 33-34 convertible owners. SMB
  8. Couple of items: First, correct that those heaters are gasoline fueled, get hot real fast, but can be dangerous. Can't imagine why anyone (but a Model A Ford driver) would want a gasoline line running just above one's feet. (I think that is why it is called a 'firewall'...). The one Dave shows is a South Wind manufactured unit. They are still manufactured and can still be purchased new. On the 'panel' v. 'sedan delivery', technically correct, sedan delivery is the single rear door model. I believe Dodge never used that term, however, choosing to call it a 'commercial sedan'. Photo attached of original 1933 ad.
  9. Understood, let me know if he is interested or wants some other photos. Shoot me a photo of the post and we can confirm it is correct. Need it! Thanks.
  10. Dave--OK, I never thought I would part with it once I found it, but ask your customer if he would be willing to trade for my 34 Dodge DRXX coupe I bought recently, couple of photos attached that were on my prior post. As you know, DRXX is quite rare, only a couple of thousand of them made. Understand if he/she is not interested, but it doesn't hurt to ask. Hope your move is going well. SMBhttp://forums.aaca.org/uploads/monthly_10_2014/post-89602-143142770958_thumb.jpg
  11. Those front square through frame fittings are very difficult to find--I misplaced one for my 34 PE and I finally found one on a front independent suspension frame clip cut off by a hot rodder (I can never understand why that is done--properly rebuild a 34 coil front suspension and they ride and handle great). The banjo bolts are another matter. Many cars use banjo bolts in that size and thread configuration and as long as they are the right diameter, thread and length, they should fit your frame fittings, brake hoses or many of the replacement hoses that are available from many places, including ebay. I don't think the originals were DB stamped on the heads so any correct banjo bolt should at least work and would look identical once installed. Dave at Dodge City (note that he is in the process of moving from Jamestown, see some of his multiple posts) should have them, I know last time I was up there he had some--tell him to look in the parts drawers that were in the room just off of the office, Mike had them stashed there!
  12. You might try to contact www.houseoftops.com. This guy makes the roof wood and hardware for mid-30s Plymouths and he may know whom to contact for the topping and trim material. Good luck!
  13. Check the firewall for a data plate on the driver's side. HC prefix is a 33, KC is 34. If it says KCL, then it was a long chassis 34. From the looks of that hood and what can be seen of the frame, it might be a bigger truck chassis, which used the same cab. Data plate would have a different prefix.
  14. Cab is 33-34 Dodge.
  15. Interesting. It is not a repro, clearly an original lithograph on very thin paper, mounted forever ago. I put it in the current frame and mats but did not cut it down from the way I found it, in a very narrow, obviously period frame and glass. No lettering on it anywhere. Again, I just love the image and the colors are like new, must have been away from the light forever. Thanks for the info!
  16. Scott Bonesteel

    1934 PE ??

    Nope, you have it right, no more holes in the starboard front. SMB
  17. Scott Bonesteel

    1934 PE ??

    Tom-- OK, keeping in mind that I have my fuel and brake lines run inside of the frame rails for safety, my 34 PE convertible frame is otherwise completely original. Starting from the center of the X-member and running back to the frame rail, each side has 6 holes but they are different from side to side. The 'port' side (driver side here in the states) holes are 3", 3 1/2", 3", 3", 3", 2 1/2", front to back. The 'starboard' (passenger side here in the states) holes are 3", 3", 3", 2", 2", 2 1/2", front to back. As you can see from the attached photos, the 2" holes are where the frame has a notch for the exhaust pipe clearance. I am not sure why there is one hole bigger on the other side, this is actually the first time I have noticed that. Looks like your passenger side does not have the notch for the exhaust pipe. Checked my 34 PE sedan and 34 Dodge DRXX coupe and they both have this notch. Hope this helps. SMB
  18. In addition, side splash aprons with the access hole at the rear, 33 not 34; passenger door with no hole for the lock below the handle, 33 not 34; wheels, hood, fenders all 33 not 34. Nice looking 33 though.
  19. I think that catch and lock assembly is the most complicated part on the entire 34 Mopar line. I have rebuilt window frames on the 34 PE Plymouths I have and I am almost glad that my 34 Dodge coupe is a DRXX without the vent windows. Real pain. Be very careful with re-installing them in the window frames because they are held in with those through-body rivets and the pot metal of which the assembly is made is very prone to cracking (although from the pictures, yours look fairly solid). Continuing to enjoy your progress and envious of your skill set.
  20. I saw it as well. Have been playing with 33-34 Mopars for years and this is a nice one. Looks like it has all of the window garnishes (which are becoming impossible to find) and is a good solid car. No more room in my garage but somebody should grab this one. Note that while the listing was corrected to a 1934 in the body of the listing, the heading had it as a 1933.
  21. Scott Bonesteel

    1934 PE ??

    Tom--There is a wood stringer mounted underneath the body that sits on top of the frame, with small rectangular spacers of body webbing at the body bolts. Wood is made of full 1 1/2" thick stock (4 cm to y'all) and has a taper at the front and various cutouts to match with the bottom of the body contour. The three attached photos are of the stringer in place underneath my PE convertible, looking from about mid-body towards the rear of the car (just the one wood stringer, not the plywood you can see, that is on top of my body dolly). The other two photos are of a single stringer out of the car. These are available from a couple of people in the states, I think most easily from an outfit called the House of Tops in our Pacific northwest. SMB
  22. Scott Bonesteel

    1934 PE ??

    I think it would be easier to find 35-36 rims, which are also 16". The center recessed area on the 34's doesn't easily drain water as does the 35-6 rims so when you do find 34 rims, they are more frequently rusted out than the 35-6. My experience is that the 35-6 wheels and caps are easier to find, no question about that. I think the rims may have been marketed to other commercial uses as well, for example I remember in the 1970s all of the local commercial skylight companies had them on their light trucks/trailers. As I indicated in my other posts, with the exception of the stripe on the cap being closer to the center on the 35-6 than on the 34, they look basically the same. I will shoot you later today a photo of my 34 convertible, which I have 35-6 rims on with 35-6 caps, simply because of my experience with 34 rims cracking and bending. If you really wanted to sneak up on people, run 35-6 rims, 35-6 caps and re-skin the caps with 34 skins. Haven't tried it (yet) but I bet it would work. You would have to look REALLY close to tell they are 35-6 rims (there is a VERY small indented recess visible on the 35-6 with the caps on that is there to allow one to insert a screwdriver or other tool into to pry off the cap that is not on the 34s).
  23. Scott Bonesteel

    1934 PE ??

    Wheel on the left is a 35-36 Plymouth. Wheel on the right is a 35 Dodge. The Plymouth wheel you have a photo of is missing the clips to hold the 35-36 style hubcaps on. The 34 artillery wheel center is actually two pieces sandwiched together, whereas the 35-36 is a single piece. My experience with the 34 rims is that they are prone to bend and also often crack around the lug holes. You could run 35-36 rims and with the caps on you cannot tell the difference except that the stripe on the 35 caps is closer to the center than on the 34. Attached photo is a 34 wheel without the cap on it. As you can see, the 34 hubcap snaps into a hole in the outer piece of the wheel center, via clips on the hubcap. As above, the 35-36 wheels have the clips on the wheel itself. Also attached is an original factory blueprint of a 34 hubcap so you can see how the clips are on the cap itself.
  24. It has been a very long time since I did mine but I do recall I did not split the hose, just drove the shaft out with a punch. If it slips when you put it back in, you can probably carefully crimp the bracket until it grips or hit the end of the shaft with a prick punch, which should expand it enough to lock it in place. Or, epoxy it in place.