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vicpanza

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Everything posted by vicpanza

  1. Thanks. Sorry I'm killing you. Maybe you'd like to come spend a week or two and help me work on it:)
  2. Correction: VIN number is correct for Feb 1934 build. Anyone have a spare 1937 (T5) motor laying around:)
  3. Hi folks: Looking at a 1934 Dodge and was wondering if anyone out there has thoughts on this. VIN number is 8025488 and engine serial number is DR-40I42 (appears to be from a car). Seller does not have any knowledge of engine condition, and I am a little concerned that the freeze plugs are out. How available at T5 motors, which is what this should have?? I've attached some pictures, and will appreciate any feedback as to issues I may be missing. I am fixated on stock restorations, so the motor is already an issue. Or, am I making too much of this?
  4. Thanks for the feedback. I just received this from the seller: VIN - 8025488 Eng. DR-40-I-42 VIN number looks like a 1935, not a 1934. And appears to have a Dodge car motor. I am curious as to perspective on this motor. How critical is it for most of you that these vehicles have their original motors. Am I making too much of this? I have added some pictures of the truck and will appreciate any feedback from the group
  5. Hi folks: I found what the seller believes is a 1934 Dodge pickup in the MN area. In speaking with him, he gave me an engine serial number that made little sense (DR-40I42), and I have not yet received the VIN number. In looking over various resources, appears that if the engine is original, it should have a T5 code. Also, have some general info regarding VIN numbers. Does anyone on the forum have experience with this year, and can you give me some direction on VIN and engine serial numbers. I am obsess with original vehicles, and if I'm going to make this type of commitment and investment (who am I kidding calling it an investment), I just want to make sure I am starting with an original truck. Also, if there is anyone in MN who might be willing to have a look at this for me, it would be a huge help. I am in Pittsburgh, and would really like to get an experienced opinion as to eyes on condition, etc. Thanks Vic Panza
  6. I had a few VIN plates silk screened and was really pleased with the results. Pictures don't do them justice. I cleaned and polished the plates, and my screener used a semi-gloss ink to screen these. May clearcoat mine to protect it, but maybe not? Thought you might like to see the results. He is holding the screen and can do more if anyone out there is interested. Best if we can get several to do at one time.
  7. Dug mine out and it is the drivers side. I misspoke as it is not painted, and will need some glazing to smooth out some pitting. But very usable. Has been blasted and primed, and ready to finish. Why don't you contact me at vicpanza@gmail.com to discuss $$ if interested. I can also send you some pics if helpful.
  8. Hi: If you are looking for the interior door moulding that goes around the window opening, I have one. It actually was painted gray when I had my parts painted. Will need to see what side it's for. As for the regulator tape, I just went through this and ended up buying a Chevy unit to get the tape. Tried to have them made, but easier said then done. There is a guy in the Phila area that is making a repo of this, and he has the tapes available, but they look like they are bluish spring steel. Also, try Dodge Central in MI as they are making regulators for the 1939-47 trucks. Drop me a note regarding the window moulding if this is of any help. Vic
  9. Thought I would offer up some comments gained over the past two months chasing two perplexing issues. I can't believe it took this much time to figure this out, and got all sorts of help (some good, others not) as to what the issues were. As with so many things, turned out to be some rather simple fixes, but what a challenge in figuring this out. Guess I need to get another 10,000 hours in rebuilding this old stuff. This is all for a 1937 Dodge MC pickup that is undergoing a full frame off restoration. Literally, every nut, bolt and screw removed, and all parts restored. 1. Burn points - once I got it started, kept burning out the points. Found an old condenser had been used in the engine rebuild, and replaced that. Cleaned points, but they kept burning to the point that the truck would stall out and not start. Installed a new coil. After speaking with a retired auto-electric guy in the area, he had me check voltage, and wouldn't you know that the rebuilt generator was putting out over 10V. Adjusted the brush and got the output to 7.5, which is within spec. Voltage at the distributor is about 4V. Seems like a fairly straightforward fix, but you have no idea how long I chased this. Took me some time to figure out that the points were the reason the engine was stopping and not start. 2. Fuel gauge - man, this one was a killer. Had a NOS gauge that was blowing fuses. Sent it to Bob's Speedometer and they told me it was not good. Bought another one from them. When power turned on, gauge spiked to full. Didn't know if it was a bad gauge or other wiring issue. Sent the gauge back (twice) and they confirmed that it was OK. Checked all grounds and they were OK (tank). Finally dropped the tank this past weekend and pulled the sending unit (a repo). Using my meter, confirmed that it was working (range is from 0 to 90 ohms). Pulled the gauge out of the truck, and using some leads, connected the gauge and sending unit as they would be installed (needed to ground the gauge mounting flange). Attached it to the battery and the needle spiked. Happened to move the float, and noticed that the gauge did work, but was reading full with the float in the low position and empty with the float in the high position (backwards). But this was great progress as I could actually see the needle move. Apparently, this is what I was seeing with it installed. With just a few gallons of fuel, the float was in the full down position, and the gauge read full. Switched the wires, but did not change. Spoke to Bob's and they mentioned that the gauges are designed to read 0 to 90 or 90 to 0 ohms. My repo sending unit was configured to read full when the shortest distance is achieved in the rheostat. Bob's suggested I try and switch the position of the float, but after some experimentation, discovered that it only fit in one direction. So, I took the plastic rheostat off the sending unit, rotated it 180 degrees and remounted it using a few small brass screws. Now it works exactly as it should. WHAT A BEAR. PROBABLY HAVE OVER 40 HOURS CHASING THESE ISSUES DOWN, AND HOPE THIS NOTE MAY HELP SOMEONE ELSE OUT THERE. While I had my test system in place for the gauge, I tested the original gauge that was all crusty, and it worked fine. Can't thanks Bruce and Matt at Bob's enough for troubleshooting this with me, and their patience. In retrospect, I would never install another fuel sending unit/gauge without first testing them for operation. Guess we ought to keep in mind that repo parts are not necessarily identical to the originals, and we just need to confirm operation, etc. Attached some pictures to show parts.
  10. Thought I would offer up some comments gained over the past two months chasing two perplexing issues. I can't believe it took this much time to figure this out, and got all sorts of help (some good, others not) as to what the issues were. As with so many things, turned out to be some rather simple fixes, but what a challenge in figuring this out. Guess I need to get another 10,000 hours in rebuilding this old stuff. This is all for a 1937 Dodge MC pickup that is undergoing a full frame off restoration. Literally, every nut, bolt and screw removed, and all parts restored. 1. Burn points - once I got it started, kept burning out the points. Found an old condenser had been used in the engine rebuild, and replaced that. Cleaned points, but they kept burning to the point that the truck would stall out and not start. Installed a new coil. After speaking with a retired auto-electric guy in the area, he had me check voltage, and wouldn't you know that the rebuilt generator was putting out over 10V. Adjusted the brush and got the output to 7.5, which is within spec. Voltage at the distributor is about 4V. Seems like a fairly straightforward fix, but you have no idea how long I chased this. Took me some time to figure out that the points were the reason the engine was stopping and not start. 2. Fuel gauge - man, this one was a killer. Had a NOS gauge that was blowing fuses. Sent it to Bob's Speedometer and they told me it was not good. Bought another one from them. When power turned on, gauge spiked to full. Didn't know if it was a bad gauge or other wiring issue. Sent the gauge back (twice) and they confirmed that it was OK. Checked all grounds and they were OK (tank). Finally dropped the tank this past weekend and pulled the sending unit (a repo). Using my meter, confirmed that it was working (range is from 0 to 90 ohms). Pulled the gauge out of the truck, and using some leads, connected the gauge and sending unit as they would be installed (needed to ground the gauge mounting flange). Attached it to the battery and the needle spiked. Happened to move the float, and noticed that the gauge did work, but was reading full with the float in the low position and empty with the float in the high position (backwards). But this was great progress as I could actually see the needle move. Apparently, this is what I was seeing with it installed. With just a few gallons of fuel, the float was in the full down position, and the gauge read full. Switched the wires, but did not change. Spoke to Bob's and they mentioned that the gauges are designed to read 0 to 90 or 90 to 0 ohms. My repo sending unit was configured to read full when the shortest distance is achieved in the rheostat. Bob's suggested I try and switch the position of the float, but after some experimentation, discovered that it only fit in one direction. So, I took the plastic rheostat off the sending unit, rotated it 180 degrees and remounted it using a few small brass screws. Now it works exactly as it should. WHAT A BEAR. PROBABLY HAVE OVER 40 HOURS CHASING THESE ISSUES DOWN, AND HOPE THIS NOTE MAY HELP SOMEONE ELSE OUT THERE. While I had my test system in place for the gauge, I tested the original gauge that was all crusty, and it worked fine. Can't thanks Bruce and Matt at Bob's enough for troubleshooting this with me, and their patience. In retrospect, I would never install another fuel sending unit/gauge without first testing them for operation. Guess we ought to keep in mind that repo parts are not necessarily identical to the originals, and we just need to confirm operation, etc. Attached some pictures to show parts.
  11. Thanks. I did find and original and am now getting it cleaned up. Having a new exterior bezel cut as the original was pretty corroded.
  12. Looking for a Trico vacuum motor for my 1937 truck. The original Trico number is either 368 or 369 (I need the drivers side and it's one of these numbers, not sure). The numbers are stamped on the back edge of the motor on the oval plate. Usually pop up when cleaned with some steel wool. Attached are few pictures of what this one looks like. Flicken does not have these nor can he restore them any more. I am game for anything in any condition. Would be great if it included the mounting hardware as well. I have some old motors that are correct for Power Wagon and other Dodge trucks (later models). Happy to trade or provide those if you need them. Appreciate any help. Thx
  13. Looking for a Trico vacuum motor for my 1937 truck. The original Trico number is either 368 or 369 (I need the drivers side and it's one of these numbers, not sure). The numbers are stamped on the back edge of the motor on the oval plate. Usually pop up when cleaned with some steel wool. Attached are few pictures shared by Alan of what this one looks like. Flicken does not have these nor can he restore them any more. I am game for anything in any condition. Would be great if it included the mounting hardware as well. I have some old motors that are correct for Power Wagon and other Dodge trucks (later models). Happy to trade or provide those if you need them. Appreciate any help. Thx
  14. OK. I was thinking or your original. If the extra hole is on in the number areas, maybe you could lay some silver solder into it, and we could have it screened. I have not dropped them off yet, and probably will not get to it for a few weeks.
  15. Well, got some help today and dropped the drive shaft and transmission. Wasn't the easiest thing I've dome lately. Was able to get the spring back on and installed the loops on the ends with the open end facing the direction of rotation, so that if the throwout bearing bracket sticks and rotates, it will pull along the length of the spring, and not slip it off the attachment points. Also bent the ends closed a bit. Drove it around in the driveway and all seems to be working OK now. Put this one to rest, and make a note about the next time we assemble these parts!
  16. Any luck on getting this plate out. As soon as I receive it, will get them to the screener
  17. Thanks. I am planning on having them silk screened. I have another, so cost will be split up a bit. Please make sure it's the same design as I have pictured above.
  18. Just disassembled and restored the regulators for my '37 MC pickup truck. Believe they are different then what the coupe uses, but if if's of any help, here are a few pictures of the parts. The cast gears on my regulators were stripped and I was able to get some made in naval brass (hard). Dave at Country Traveler has my extra stock. Happy to walk you through this if your issues rests with the gears. The gear mechanism is contained in a round housing that is easily removed by grinding off three areas where is was swedged on after being pressed through the plate. Once this was reassembled, we just tack welded the cup back into place. I also took my mechanisms and had them yellow zinc plated, because I am a bit out of my mind doing an extreme restoration:). A good coat of paint after blasting would do. Good luck Vic
  19. Like I said, I'm getting really good at taking this stuff apart
  20. Note the back of the bell housing has an access hole to get at the clutch bolts, but it's too high to get at the sleeve that holds the throw-out bearing. That's the issue.
  21. Thanks for all the feedback. This model uses a transmission (bell housing) that doesn't provide any access to the spring. Have been thinking about this, but when the dust settles, will probably have to drop the drive shaft and transmission. Hell, for a novice, I'm getting good at this!
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