Nevadavic

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About Nevadavic

  • Rank
    Junior Member
  • Birthday 07/02/1943

Profile Information

  • Gender:
    Male
  • Location:
    Gardnerville, Nevada
  • Interests:
    I've been in the old car hobby for over 55 years.... Wow, how the time flies by!

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  1. 4 “Lester” 6.00-23 used vintage wide whitewall tires for FREE. There is still good tread left. Come and get them in Gardnerville, Nevada. Local pick up preferred, I don't want to ship them. .....Call Vic at (775) 691-8295.....
  2. Hi Buzz68, I saw your ad about the Model A and would like to come over and see it. I'm in Gardnerville, only a half hour away. Please give me a call when you are available. Vic
  3. Is the Hudson still for sale? And have you come up with a price? Vic
  4. 1941 Buick Roadmaster sedan, Series 71, exterior window trim, 5 pieces total. A full set for all the side windows plus an extra for the front passenger window. Some small pitting typical on all the pieces, see photo. $100.00 for all of them plus shipping. Please PM me with any questions.
  5. 1941 Buick Roadmaster sedan, Series 71, exterior window trim, 5 pieces total. A full set for all the side windows plus an extra for the front passenger window. Some small pitting typical on all the pieces, see photo. $125.00 for all of them plus shipping. Please PM me with any questions.
  6. The Umbrella Valve Seals didn't work; the inner valve springs didn't allow enough room. I did use the Chevy o-ring seals on all the valves though. After the break-in procedure the car now has no smoke and does seem to run better. Maybe the oil being fed to the rocker arms had nowhere to go but out the small hole in the top of the rocker arms and down the valve stems when the engine had the solid lifters installed. Anyway… I now have a 1949 Buick engine with the proper hydraulic lifters installed and no smoke.
  7. Well, I just couldn’t “leave things alone.” The tail pipe smoke was not going away and I needed to take a chance on putting hydraulic lifters in the engine. Bloo responded on November 27, that I really need to find out what kind of cam I have. He mentioned something about ‘clearance ramps.” I did some research and found the following: “The difference in a solid lifter camshaft and a hydraulic camshaft is the “clearance ramps” on the leading edge of the cam lobe’s shape. I also found this: You need to measure the “lash ramp,” that is the area on the cam coming off the base circle at the lowest point that the lifter can be, and then look for the start of the lifter lift. A hydraulic cam will show very little lift before going to rapid lift… about .003 to ,006, a solid cam might be in the .010 to .030 range.” I used a dial indicator on one of the lifters and slowly turned the engine over and watched the dial indicator several times. The estimated readings were .004 - .006 before the dial indicator really took off. I think the cam is hydraulic. I did get several boxes of parts when I bought the car and found the correct hydraulic hollow push rods, hydraulic ball studs with the oil passage in them and a few used hydraulic lifters. When I took the rocker arms off to clean them, they had the oil passage for the ball studs. The existing solid lifter setup used ball studs with no oil passages and solid push rods and lifters. I bought new hydraulic lifters from Bob’s and used the proper hydraulic ball studs and the correct hydraulic push rods. I soaked the new lifters in a can of oil for a couple days and then replaced the solid lifters with the new lifters. I did a break-in procedure for the lifters just like a new cam break-in procedure. I used the procedure to set the lifter preload as outlined on Buicks.net. INITIAL ADJUSTMENT OF HYDRAULIC VALVE LIFTERS http://www.buicks.net/shop/reference/l-8_valve_adjustment.html After the break-in procedure the car now has no smoke and does seem to run better. Maybe the oil being fed to the rocker arms had nowhere to go but out the small hole in the top of the rocker arms and down the valve stems. Anyway… I now have a 1949 Buick engine with the proper hydraulic lifters installed and no smoke. Vic
  8. Hi buick man, Thank you for your response. I haven’t installed the lifters in the engine yet but have done the following so far: I put the hydraulic lifters in a coffee can with break-in oil for several days. I then took the lifters out and set them on the bench. I then took a push rod and compressed each lifter several times to make sure there was full travel. They all seem to rebound like they should. I’m going to wipe the bottom of the lifters and apply assembly lube to each one and do the same to the cam lubes before assembly. I’m going to use the procedure outlined on Buicks.net INITIAL ADJUSTMENT OF HYDRAULIC VALVE LIFTERS http://www.buicks.net/shop/reference/l-8_valve_adjustment.html After the engine is reassembled I’ll due a break-in procedure for the lifters.
  9. Thanks again Ben and NTX5467 for your expert help! I had the head worked on by outfit in Reno, NV and they said the valve guide were within factory specifications. I gave them the specifications for a 1950 series 70 engine I got online. Yes, the first thing I did was to check the fitting that supplies oil to the rocker arm shaft. The one that was in the head when I bought the car was wrong; the hole was around an 1/8” diameter. I replaced it with one with a much smaller hole, about a 1/16” like you said. I learned to check that because other old cars have had the same issue. I did think about reducing the solid lifter clearance to .006 or so, but since I had the head off I thought I would go back to the original hydraulic lifters since the cam is hydraulic and the engine is supposed to be a hydraulic engine. Also replacing the solid lifters with hydraulics would reduce the amount of oil coming out of the rocker arm holes as mentioned above in my post. By the way, the ‘41 shop manual says; “Series 50 and 70 cylinder head cannot be removed without damage to #16 push rod unless #16 push rod is lifted and removed or installed with the head. This is because head must be pushed forward to clear the body. #16 push rod cannot be installed after head is in place for the same reason.” Not an easy change to do. The ‘49 engine is in a ’41 Roadmaster sedan…. Vic
  10. Another thought.... Using solid lifters on a hydraulic cam and setting the rocker arm clearance at .015 change the valve timing by several degrees? I did pre-lube the hydraulic lifters by soaking them in oil for several days and then pressed a push rod and oil on each of them several times.
  11. Thanks for your responses Ben and NTX5467 . I ordered the umbrella stem seals: 3/8 HI-TEMP Silicone Umbrella Valve Seal Set of 16 Enginetech S2886-16 https://www.ebay.com/itm/3-8-HI-TEMP-Silicone-Umbrella-Valve-Seal-Set-of-16-Enginetech-S2886-16-/301713299191 I have taken the head off the ’49 Roadmaster engine. The engine was fitted with solid lifters instead of hydraulics. I did find some hydraulic parts in the extra parts boxes I got with the car. The existing rocker arms do have the oil passage holes to the ball studs but had solid lifter ball studs with no oil holes installed instead. The push rods were solid push rods with no oil hole as well. Since the rocker arms don’t have the hydraulic parts installed, most of the oil is coming out the oil hole on top of the rocker arms and going to the valve stems. If the hydraulic parts were installed instead, I would think most of the oil would be going down the push rods to the hydraulic lifters. The rocker arm hole feeding oil to the ball studs is much larger than the hole on top of the rocker arms. In a previous post, there was some question whether the camshaft in the car was hydraulic or solid. I found the following: The difference in a solid lifter camshaft and a hydraulic camshaft is the “clearance ramps” on the leading edge of the cam lobe’s shape. I also found this: You need to measure the “lash ramp,” that is the area on the cam coming off the base circle at the lowest point that the lifter can be, and then look for the start of the lifter lift. A hydraulic cam will show very little lift before going to rapid lift… about .003 to ,006, a solid cam might be in the .010 to .030 range. I used a dial indicator on one of the lifters and slowly turned the engine over and watched the dial indicator several times. The estimated readings were .004 - .006 before the dial indicator really took off. I think the cam is hydraulic. I bought hydraulic lifters from Bob’s and found the proper hydraulic ball studs with oil holes and the correct hydraulic push rods in the extra parts boxes. I’m going to install the hydraulic lifters, the correct ball studs and push rods and break-in the lifters just like a cam break-in procedure. I also found “1951 Buick Hydraulic Valve Lifter Adjustment” procedure for adjusting the lifters using the firing order for cylinder 1 and 8. It simplifies the adjustment procedure by aligning the flywheel “UDC 1-8” marks in the timing hole. “Turn adjusting ball stud down exactly 2 turns” seems a lot but that is what the procedure says. Vic
  12. Did a 1949 Buick 320 cu in engine originally have valve stem seals? I can’t seem to find any information about valve stem seals being used on an original stock engine. If seals where used, where do I get them or what would be the modern equivalent? Is machining necessary to fit modern seals to the valve guides?
  13. Hi again avgwarhawk, The photo of the piston rings was what I found installed from the previous owner. The two compression rings were correct but the bottom three-piece oil ring was not. I purchased a new set of piston rings from Bob’s. The bottom ring is now a one- piece cast iron oil ring. Yeah, maybe I didn’t need hardened seats,,, but I have them now….. From all the input I have received, I think I’ll just keep the existing set up and run it as is for now. Vic