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MarrsCars

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Everything posted by MarrsCars

  1. Revealing this sort of info actually helps deter counterfeits as it educates a large group of enthusiasts on what to look for, sometimes even the type of stamping/engraving/embossing, placement, method of attachment of a plate, etc., are all better clues to originality than simply "matching" the correct number.
  2. I just searched "carb" and got 85-pages of results. Not sure why the discrepancy but so you know it's not an across the board issue.
  3. I always enjoy your sense of humor and quips, but this is indeed "harsh" to use your words. When we wonder why the hobby is primarily limited to older white men who are dying off and taking the hobby right along with them, yet complain loudly that we aren't attracting younger, modern enthusiasts to carry the torch, I have to believe this sort of thinking is partly responsible.
  4. I find my auto coverage to be a fantastic deal at less than $500 annually for $50k agreed value on the coupe, far less than what I paid before I had "collector car" insurance.
  5. Carl my old friend, we must have walked right past one another last summer! I sadly had to miss this past weekend's event, did you make it down? To the originl question posed in this thread... I use Chubb collector car insurance and this is their policy on towing: "Towing If your classic car is disabled in a covered loss, Chubb will not only pay the fair cost to move your vehicle to the shop of your choice, we will do so using the transport service of your choosing. Chubb will also cover the emergency labor costs incurred at the time of the incident." This is their policy for replacement parts, "Whether you need a fender for your Galaxie, or a trunk pan for your Gullwing, Chubb understands the importance of the perfect part. We will work with your restoration shop to properly restore your vehicle to its pre-loss condition and authenticity. Keep in mind that with Chubb Collector Car insurance, you choose the restoration facility that will repair your vehicle. When you combine our parts and equipment coverage with our $0 deductible Agreed Value feature, you’ll find that Chubb Collector Car insurance is the most comprehensive program available." They seem far more accommodating than other insurers in many relevant ways, I have little in the way of use restrictions, no deductibles, no mileage caps, etc. Good luck on your search!
  6. To be the odd man out I say go for the list you provided as they would be far more visually interesting to see on screen, and I do like the Red Dawn sort of vibe to the story. It's a movie, so the tech specs aren't terribly relevant but you seem to have an interest in keeping it close to possible. Maybe less heavy guns and more light machine guns, anti tank weapons like RPG, etc. Home made flame throwers would work as well. Sure the tanks could easily dispatch most of these in real life, but heck, even a dozen Stormtroopers can't hit Luke with their blasters so maybe your crew of under-seige Canadians can find ways to disable their capabilities to a degree. This is where Rusty's suggestion would be useful, ask soldiers with experience in this field what caused them troubles in wartime and what were the effective defenses of the enemy. Of course you may end up on a government watch list for asking these questions, but so be it for art!
  7. This article makes some interesting commentary about the Tesla crash and indicates it may have largely been the driver's fault. http://jalopnik.com/tesla-driver-in-fatal-florida-crash-got-numerous-warnin-1796226021 I'm all for both electric and autonomous cars, and am very excited for the coach building possibilities for cars once again as most electrics will be built on a separate classic that you can fit a body onto, custom would be so much easier than on unibody cars, and with 3D printing we are looking at a new age in automotive creativity.
  8. The Jag is an XJ220 and the Ferrari is a 512bb. Great pics of some cool cars, nice finds!
  9. The last issue should be online shortly, remember there's two online issues, one free for anyone and one free for members to be found here: http://www.aaca.org/Publications/antique-automobile-magazine.html Also, I realize this is not what you want but for anyone seeking a swan neck mirror in a really elegant style, cars like mine came with this one mounted on the fender, tho you could put it anywhere. Probably more for the modding crowd than here where originality is key, but the repro price ($129) is pretty good compared to finding a NOW one. This one is from eBay.
  10. Would you attribute the thinness of the body rails and steering wheel in your video file to light/shadows or how would you remedy that? The Austin Healey I linked had odd spaces on the body, I can see how reflections could make this difficult to capture, and now that I say (type) that it reminds me that a friend who does 3D scanning for work explained that they often paint reflective items in order to get a good scan... so I may have answered my own question, but still interested in your opinion on your go-kart.
  11. I understand exactly what you mean, that is a much more specialized service, and one that I tend to really only see in European glass-making centers today such as the Czech Republic. You may be able to reach out to Corning or a similar glass specialist and inquire, or maybe start posting to glass-blower and glass artist forums for more specific advice. You may want to use the terms "cut glass similar to Bohemian cut crystal" to explain to the glass folks what you're seeking. If you've never seen the process it's pretty amazing, usually an artisan holds the glass piece up against a spinning grinding wheel and their body movements are what put the design in, it's not like they are using hand tools where they can easily maneuver a bit or grinder. Here's a video from Waterford Crystal in Ireland going about the rather fascinating work:
  12. @Gary_Ash You have sent me down the rabbit hole! I found this Austin Healey on the same site, some people have even scanned their entire property, homes, outbuildings and stables included! https://gallery.autodesk.com/remake/projects/46324/austin-healey-3000-cast-model?searched=
  13. I am so in love with those little P1800 cars. They have Ferrari flair, Ghia-like uniqueness, and Volvo quality. The glass-back P1800es estate cars are beautiful as well. I'm all in!
  14. Apparently I'm a big fan of your automotive tastes! I have never seen either of these cars before today and just love their artistry. The Riviera reminds me a bit of my first car, the '57 Cadillac I've mentioned here before.
  15. Excellent development of your style. Well done! (BTW, the "gmial" part of your email address appears to be misspelled in your signature.)
  16. I call this one the "Ivory Zeppelin" and she has quite a following on social media, even has her own Instagram account. She's far more popular than I ever will be.
  17. This is my father and his brother with my Grandfather's 1956 Sedan DeVille. He always had Cadillacs apparently, I remember them right up through the 1980's. That's probably why my parents later had them also and maybe why my first car was a '57 sedan.
  18. Probably a LeMons racer, they have to come in at under $500 right?
  19. In truth I would absolutely be using the car for daily use if I didn't get agreed value collector insurance on her a few years back which limits her use. While my policy isn't as strict as many others I still cannot use it for everyday errands. The car is more than capable and reliable enough, handles the curves out on our backroads better than our modern cars, and regular driving keeps everything in good condition as we all know, but I feel much better these days not having to worry about a fender bender. Don;t get me wrong, I still drive the car once or twice a week but usually just open road cruising with food stops to break the monotony.
  20. The very first year I owned my coupe, before I had collector's insurance on her, I decided to drive her daily for a full year in all weather to see her needs, limits and where she excelled. I got more than one stare out in the old Home Depot parking lot. I once had to curl up a 20-ft section of field tile piping and the dude at the supply shop was afraid to help me load it into the trunk, I had to tell him several times, "you're not going to hurt the car." These days she pretty much only stops for gas or ice cream.
  21. "Low values" for automobiles do not generally include this poor of a condition, this would rate lower than the "base value low" he is quoting quite significantly.
  22. These are so awesome, and yes some are collectible, we buy and sell them often. The earlier pieces are best of course, 50's and 60's but later pieces done in the same style can find a home with the right graphics. Like anything else, it's the subject matter that counts, the image, the geographic location (SoCal clubs are worth more than Indiana clubs for example). Neat stuff guys, would love to see the women's jackets too!
  23. It's been several years now but I remember watching an investigative news show where they covered scams like these and that many times they "recruit" people from the craigslist jobs available section and these people actually believe they are working as a personal assistant to someone, collecting their business mail and forwarding it along, so there may very well be a Mr. Alvarado in Crawfordsville, Indiana and he may very well cash your check and send most of the money along to "Mr. Pebbles" and actually be committing a crime but having no idea he's doing so and believing he's working a legitimate part time job. Crazy huh?
  24. This is the carburetted, four door sister to my 220se coupe. They do make a hell of a racket on start up, probably why you thought she may be a diesel, but it's just a mechanical symphony to my ears. They are kinda like starting up an old airplane, which makes sense as the fuel injected version was developed from the system first used in Luftwaffe aircraft. You turn the key and let the pump prime for a bit, clear the air out of the steel fuel lines, hit the starter position and hold the key even after it begins to fire up, and after a couple more seconds you can release the key as she settles in to a purr over the next minute or so. The engine sound is remarkably different once it's totally warmed up, just so much character in these, no wonder he refused the trade!
  25. That's interesting to learn. I do not have any documentation, but I do know that the folks at Custom Coach in Ohio originally did the custom work, and when it went back for it's restoration in the mid-2000's it went to Creative Mobile Interiors in Grove City, Ohio because several of the original craftsmen who worked on Unit One at Custom Coach were now working at Creative Mobile Interiors. I spoke often with folks at the company during it's restoration as the bus's owner, Dave Wright, and I were coordinating it's completion for our upcoming Tennessee Three tour to support the release of the film Walk the Line. I'm certain if you reached out to them they could provide you with the details. Additionally, the builders of the bus, MCI in Canada, hosted the band in the mid-2000's for a corporate event where they went all out with a live performance and meet-and-greet with factory employees, but they also cleaned and detailed the bus while the band was performing and even replaced the headlight stolen by a fan while on the road. They should also have some records on how the bus was originally supplied. I know MCI has HQ in Illinois but there is some reason we went to the Canadian office, my memory eludes me as to why. Here's an article I found on the Creative Mobile Interiors site detailing this period of time, it takes you to a PDF file: Collector Brings Cash's Bus to Grove City One thing to note, when the article was published we didn't know where the bus would end up after the tour, a couple of places are mentioned in the piece but I also spoke with the Petersen Museum in LA but they were concerned about having enough space for such a large vehicle, thus, it ended up at the Rock and Roll Museum in Ohio. I believe it is seasonally displayed outdoors so check to be sure it's on display if you're making a special trip to view it. @jackofalltrades70 Those are some wonderful memories I am sure.
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