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MHuppguy

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About MHuppguy

  • Birthday 09/02/1944

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  1. Sounds like you have headlamps from an early '28 Hupmobile A series car. If so the explanation is simple. According to the Hupp Parts manual, early A series cars came standard with steel, black head and taillamp buckets. Chrome lamps were available as an option, then became standard at car # A115,001.These can be identified because the parking lights were mounted in the headlamp reflector, there were no cowl lights While this was Hupp's practice, it may also been that of other manufacturers as well.. Sorry, I didn't know you are doing an Auburn. But you should remove the mounts from the buckets so any plating solutions can be flushed away and not caught between the mount and bucket to cause problems later. The mounting base can then be restored and reassembled easily. I use 1/4-20, stainless steel carriage bolts. I turn the heads down on the lathe to the shape of the rivet head, polish them and they look "factory", even against the chrome finish.
  2. If you are running tubeless tires , wether bias ply or radial ply, on a rim designed for tube type tires you must use a tube! and a radial tube if you are going to radial tires. Do this in spite of the laws in some states the ban the use of tubes in tubeless tires. The radial tube is thicker than the bias ply tire tube and will wear much longer. The tube is essential because it will hold the tire bead in place on the tube type rim. The bead lock is a safety ridge necessary to keep the tire from separating from the bead under hard cornering situations. The shape of the bead for a tubeless tire is different than that of a tube type tire and may not remain seated on the wheel rim in some circumstances. For old, non tubeless rims, always use a "gutter strip" to cover the rivets in the drop center. I have learned this over the last 62 years in the auto repair business and teaching automotive Technology for 30 years, so these are not just my opinions.
  3. MHuppguy

    trunk

    Wanted: metal trunk curved or slanted back, 33" x 13" at bottom . Ken Sommers mhupp28@comcast.net
  4. This looks like a very solid car. None of the incorrect parts are hard to amend. The light switch, spark advance and throttle levers at the steering wheel center and the horn buttonhole been or are in the process of being reproduced. Join the Hupp Club and advertise your needs to encourage more report. projects of the necessary parts. The door sill trim is installed with escutcheon pins on top as you already know. Flat headed body nails are used on the underside and can only be installed with the body raised from the frame. If your carb is leaking and is the pot metal unit , there may be cracks in the float bowl. The source of leaks in the bronze units usually is from the needle valve sticking open or the float sticking. This could also be true for the pot metal units and for either one requires removal for a thorough cleaning and inspection. Huppguy
  5. For all '28 and '29 M series cars the crankcase was natural aluminum, the oilman natural zinc and the block, head and all accessories were gloss black. The carburetor, whether the pot metal UU2 or the bronze UU2, were painted in aluminum paint. I have one nearly all original '29 and two '28s, one of which was un touchd before a cosmetic overhaul, and they, as well as several parts cars, had these details. That has led me to assume they are correct. Huppguy
  6. Are you a Hupmobile Club member? If not, join up and your needs will be advertised in the HUPP HERALD. If there is enough interest, I would be willing to take on a report. project for this piece as I will soon need one - the original in my '29 M cabriolet looks ready to go south. What body style is your car? Ken, AKA Huppguy, Hupmobile Club Tech Adviser for '28 and '29 M cars
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