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Dave39MD

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Posts posted by Dave39MD

  1. Once you determine it is not loose screws ,hinge pins, loose body bolts, or bad wood you can adjust door gap. The Fisher Body manuals and/or your vehicle service manual may explain it. Generally if you add a shim between the body sill and vehicle frame at the bolt nearest to the hinge post it would raise the rear of the door.

     

    Dave

    • Like 3
  2. Do you know what the writing on the spark plug cover says, I see a 33 and the oil temperature regulator is different than my 60 series 31 but that may be proper . The pipe from the exhaust to the heat riser is missing but that is not a big deal. The King-Seely fuel gauges were filled with a corrosive liquid that often rusted the face. I have a rusty one that may be able to be saved if you are in a real pinch. Looks like a very nice car.

     

    Dave

  3. One more bit of info. The picture of the AC L-1 I posted above was of a 1942 L-1. By then the aluminum was going to the war effort not paint. I have attached a photo  of a 1940 AC L-1 showing the alloy paint in case someone is wondering the color. This came from Patrick Doonan's "The Great Oil Filter Debate" .

     

    Dave

     

     

    oil filter 1940 L-1.jpg

  4. This old post  might explain the difference we see today. According to Dave Corbin the Buicks headed west of the Mississippi were equipped with oil filters from the factory, east no filter unless added by the dealer or owner. I might speculate the oe AC filters were black and the ones added by the dealer were the regular AC production color.

     

    I know it is still dark...

     

  5. The L-1 filter in early 1940 opened in the middle, that may be the seam you speak of. It also had a tee handle on top instead of the normal bolt. The later L-1 in 1940 opened at the top and had a welded bottom plate.

     

    I understand the black filter but all the AC info and other research I have does not mention a black AC in 1940 just the silver like paint. Maybe Buick specified black to start with and AC obliged a good customer.

     

    More light where there is no darkness, sorry.

     

    Dave

    • Like 2
  6. The AC with the orange top and blue shell started about 1950. The 1940 AC filter can has been described as an aluminum grey. It makes me wonder in 1940 when Buick added them to the engine or were they dealer installed. If Buick added them wouldn't they be painted engine color? I don't know just curious.

     

    Dave

     

     

  7. I would say you do need a very good fitting screw driver and if the tube breaks in the carb you will need the extraction tools. I would be tempted to leave it alone since it sounds like it is sealing and would work on the other issues. There are some very good carb rebuilders who frequent this site; https://vccachat.org/. They have the knowledge, parts,  and special tools needed if your carb needs more than an adjustment.

     

    Dave

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