Jump to content

Highlander160

Members
  • Posts

    360
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by Highlander160

  1. Kendall racing oil is a straight grade variant if that's also what you seek. Sold as "Nitro 40" or Nitro 50" it's a great alternative to old engines seeking straight grades and different additive packages. While I may get lambasted for this, it's a freaking Ford 4 cyl engine! It'll run on anything and live through volumes of abuse, NEVER needs hardened valve inserts, and frankly doesn't even need zinc (ZDDP) in the oil. Visit www.fordbarn.com and scam around on the Model A pages regarding oils and ZDDP. An eye opener to be sure, and 'ol Henry was very proud of his metallurgy knowledge. Most Ford owners are too. Good luck and don't over think it. Also, shameless plug here, I have a 1933 1 bbl manifold in above average condition. It does have the update done to the rear that some want and some don't. PM me here or email me at highlander809@gmail.com if you might want it.
  2. I turned down a shot on some show BS. I asked around, wondered what was in it for participants, etc. The replies I got were enlightening. The one I remember most was the producer's use of what was called "Frankenbites". Whether or not it was correct, the gig is that they edit things to sound like what they want it to be vs the real deal. If I were to say "...and so n so is a complete a** hole..." they can edit it to say one of my friends or comrades on the show was the one I was speaking of. Reality? I got your reality "right here"! What's really sad, and not to get too political, it seems all the public figures that we elect to be our advocates use the business model of a friggen reality show vs actually earning the position. I see it from the White House on down, but hey maybe that's just my observation. A neon single fingered salute to most all of em. Although I gotta say, having my own history of real street racing (did I just say that?) I sort of enjoy "Street Outlaws". Not as real as what we did but the cars are so freakin fast these days we'd never survive. At least it's "organized" to a degree. Your results may vary, tax n title extra, blah, blah, blah...
  3. DING! DING! DING! DING! DING! We have a winner. Distributor mount more or less confirms it.
  4. All that chrome prep is the $$$$. Strip, drill, acid copper, low temp silver solder where drilled, metal finish, final copper/nickel/chrome. I try to do my own whenever possible, but even the stripping process is different for aluminum and diecast. Wrong process, the parts disappear like magic...!
  5. Matt nailed it. Some cars never had matching numbers. I had someone tell me a 34 Packard had all matching numbers once. I asked "Which ones?" and got a stumbling response. Some early Packards had very close numbers, some as far off as 800 (engine, frame, front axle, rear axle, trans, steering box). He's also right that it's born of the muscle car rise in interest and value. You, however, are talking about a mass produced commodity from 1947. There's one thing that does indeed increase the subject car's value, that being the body style. What some refer to as a "short door" coupe, the roof line is just about as sexy as an early V8 can get without a canvas top. QUALITY has more effect on the long term value of this car than anything. Front spring shackles and a set of wheels make it look like a coveted hot rod for a Saturday afternoon's effort. Bolt on period accessories, done well with restraint (not too much of any ONE thing), again can add value. It's a car that YOU can build YOUR way and never worry about the dollars too much. Almost always in demand and an easy sell. My vote would be slightly hopped up stock with a stance and some wheels. Your results may vary, tax n title extra, void where prohibited...
  6. So back in the 1950s this guy chopped a Deuce coupe, added a Chrysler HEMI, painted it Buick Titian Red, fitted the trans with Zephyr gears and added a V8 quickchange rear axle. Inside he chromed the moldings and had a black pleated vinyl interior stiched up, all of it detailed with miscellaneous chroming and special finishes here n there. A show stopper everywhere it went and fast too. Last year someone finds it and cleans it all up with a bit of airbrushed touch up, some nip-tuck to the interior, lots of chrome polish and car wax. Once again, a show stopper everywhere it goes wearing all but the tires and hoses it was born with. What is it? A misfit from days gone by or a true HOT ROD survivor from the glory days of the past?
  7. I'll end my comments with 2 facts. I never said ALL were sharp and educated, and as obvious as the sunrise and sunset there's exceptions to any rule or venue. Also, those who I've dealt with over decades were all very sharp and knowledgeable about what they wanted and what to pay. Over n out...
  8. As to going from one auction house to another, apparently someone spotted a car worth more and gambled that it would attract a higher paying bidder elsewhere. If you really know a lot about a lot of different cars/eras, and if you have the money to invest/risk, it can be done every year. It can be done going from one Mecum sale to another in the same year. A 69-71 Cobra Jet Mustang has a tier 1 value of $55-60K. You spot one at a less than popular sale and find out that it's the real deal, never rusted or properly restored, has good street cred in the form of Marti reports and documentation, the hammer price is $31K. Even after commission and transport as well as entry fees you're all in at $40K and you're confident that going into a hornet's nest of principals there must be 2-3 guys who see it as you do. I guess it's really criminal to market that car to the right venue and make a few bucks, right? That's the difference in what you see and what I see, and the difference in the approach. Not once in my scenario did words come out that evoked ANY disrespect to that market, that sale. If anyone were to go into it thinking "...some rich azzhole will buy it there..." it would show. It would result in a no sale or a loss, and in my opinion it would be deserved. Perspective is important, and "...doing nothing..." isn't always true either. A weekend of detailing can mean 5 figures of profit, or is profit one of those dirty words too?
  9. I'll be doing an 1104 Sport Phaeton soon. Packard offered the 5P phaeton, 5P Sport Phaeton (dual cowl) and the 7P Touring on all of the available chassis combinations except the 1100 an 1103 (short WB 5P sedans, 8 and Su8). We have all new spring assist tubes and hinges and have to build the missing cowl. Not an uncommon occurrence, once the sport phaetons became used cars several folks ditched the second cowl for easier use. I'm sure many cowls were left in garages and eventually scrapped. Yes, the 1104 is the real deal with special center vent doors, a unique front seat back sheet metal panel, and of course the 761 body type stamped in the wood and on the cowl tag. Should be a fun project.
  10. It seems as though I'm seeing more negative reactions to this year's sale, both online and in 1 on 1 conversation. The most notable comment seems to be about "...crazy people with too much money..." in general terms. I have to ask, how many of you truly believe that the guy who pays $350K for a Camaro is ignorant, dumb, stupid or some ego-maniacal dim wit? I've been selling cars off and on for over 30 yrs. Everything from a Model A project car to a Model J Duesenberg, and a list so long of muscle cars I can't recall all of them. Within the hundreds of folks I've dealt with there's never been some mope just dying throw 1/2 again as much as the car's value just because he can. How did some of the televised buyers become able to bid what they do, win or lose? Ladies n gents that's sour grapes, plain and simple. The majority of buyers with the loot to play are sharp about what they want. If it isn't them crawling in and under the car it's their agent or expert inspector that gives a thumbs up or down. I've been that guy several times. Why does 1 orange Yenko Camaro get bid to $225K and the one 6-7 cars later struggle to see $150K? Because the 1st one was a better car, PERIOD. Do any of us think that all 1932 Packard 900s are now worth $250K? I hope not. That car belonged to the late Mr. Bill Buddig. There was never a square inch of his cars out of place or in less than #1 condition. If you're a Packard guy you understand without words why that strong bid happened. The 33 12 behind it? Why so low? I don't know that car in particular but I can only guess that it wasn't nearly as crisp and well presented as the 900 regardless of the magic that TV cameras serve. Every principal I've ever dealt with was nothing like what many say about the B-J bidders. To carry on about it? Well now, who would the ignorant one be then? He might be found over the top of his bathroom sink. Just sayin...
  11. The one that sold at B J was essentially the best one on the planet. Indesputable pedigree, highly respected past owner and restorer. Still really high? Maybe, bit that's one of those discussions best had over coffee or beers.
  12. 32 900? Yep, I'm in with that description too. The 900 2/4 coupes had padded covered tops, and that one doesn't appear to have ever had a metal finished top like the later cars. Dayuumm, she's a tough one...
  13. Ethanol is an oxygen bearing fuel. The difference in E 10 (common midwest pump fuel) and straight gasoline is actually a leaner fuel/air mixture. We go through this on our hopped up sleds, that ethanol actually reads lean on the plugs and leaves a smaller "wash" than desried on the piston crown. Even though that's the case there's still some additional energy in today's fuel vs the old days. The best way to compensate is in the ignition system. Better to light it a couple degrees advanced to help ensure a cleaner and more efficient burn. E 85 has huge potential for later cars that had high compression ratios. In something like a late 50s to early 60s Cadillac or a 60s muscle car the flow can be increased by about 30% and ignition timing can remain stock or even advanced a bit. E 85 acts like 105 octane gas in that regard but the BTUs (energy) are lower, thus the need for additional volume. Mileage suffers on E 85 as well, but who worries about mileage in a Ram Air Trans Am or 58 Eldorado with tri-power? To get good readings on plugs with ethanol blended fuel you need to run wide open for about 8-10 seconds in high gear, let off and stuff the clutch in and shut off the engine right away, coasting to the side of the road. Pull a plug or 2 and it should look like coffee with cream on the ceramic. Yes, you could also stuff an exhaust 'sniffer' in the tailpipe but what fun is that? Just sayin...
  14. May I recommend A Heckler and Koch P2000 in 9mm? If even 1 hair stands up on the back of your neck, pass. My heart goes out to the couple who's lives were lost, and to us it's exponentially tragic. 99.991876% of "us" are some of the greatest folks you'll ever meet.
  15. Sand the surface of the rubber roller an it holds a bit more material, but still not enough to get too heavy. 400 grit should work, a little bit of slow dry solvent helps too. You need to get your own mojo on for what consistency works for you which is 1/2 the fun of jobs like this. Go for it...
  16. One should always prepare properly when potential hazards exist. I work with dangerous and flammable materials daily, in fact have been for decades now. You're absolutely right, and others should also heed such advice. It's easy to become complacent and forget the hazardous nature of common materials.
  17. I wonder if a couple 1 gallon buckets in a closed up interior would do the same? In my experience, every late 70s to mid 90s Rolls and Bentley smells like mildew if it has leather seating. I'm going to try this when the need arises. Thank you for the tip.
  18. With over plating of copper there's also a tendancy for cracks. You may not see them right away, you may make some during the build, but just like too much filler (bondo) failure comes sooner and easier. Better to make the part right by prep rather than fill. Walt is good people and will work with you on anything you send over. For general plating of regular parts they're hard to beat. They can make stuff as nice as you need it to be as well. And Barry, you're welcome as always. Keep punchin bruz...
  19. Wayne, MI in S.E. Michigan. You'll still need warp capability...
  20. Call Micro Plating in Romulus. Their specialty is bumpers finished to an OEM standard. They use a grey nickel for fill and bright nickel for the final inspection (both of which can be finished). By not using copper their prices are very user friendly. It won't look like something on a money's-no-object restoration but it will look really nice, perhaps no better than OEM, certainly no worse. Price? Call them and tell us but to hazard a guess I'd say in the neighborhood of $500, give or take a bit. No, I don't recall the guy's name I deal with now but you have nothing to lose taking it there and getting a feel for their work and price. Custom related chrome shops, with the expense of copper and EPA regs, I'd estimate somewhere north of $1000 and perhaps well north. You already know the pitfalls (no pun intended) of too much copper, AND it reduces the life of the part's bright work. Good luck...
  21. I'm going by memory bud, but something like 95-100. And you never want any grease or lube on the taper. We talked about that when we pulled drums on the Ruxton. I have some Lincoln literature beyond an auth manual, I'll check when I finish snow duty...
  22. You have to figure the averages on your own. Find all the cars sold either at auction or in online auctions/ads that say "sold". I would go back maybe 3-4 yrs max. Find 10 cars and divide the total sale prices by 10. That gives you a broad average. Beware of specials or 1 off types as they don't fully represent averages. I did this with a relatively easy car to average out, a 65 Pontiac GTO. With mine heading toward a restored but 'day 2' car I came up with an average value of $31,500 rounded up or down to the nearest $500. Private sales are harder to track down. Unless you know or talk to one of the parties involved you may not get the right answer. Don't use "...and he only paid $XXX.00 for it..." from any level of hearsay. Even those involved my inflate or deflate the result for their own reasons.
  23. The way to charge an Optima, they respond well being attached to another standard battery by jumper cables. You then put the charger on the standard battery and both the battery and charger will charge the Optima. Don't go over 10A on the charger. As to + or - ground on the car, the batteries and charger don't care about the car's circuit. Just attach to the requisite posts. The Optima should hold a charge for quite some time.
  24. Use it! Frank Sinatra said, "You only live once, but if you live like me once is enough." I know, right?
  25. He wanted to be different, just like everyone else. Just sayin...
×
×
  • Create New...