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J&J

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About J&J

  • Birthday 12/24/1966

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  1. Hi Hugh, I replied to the email you sent to cartercar.org also. It looks like the oil in the reservoir is low and should be added before it is used, so it is good that you noticed it. Here is an excerpt from the Model K Cartercar manual which also had the same motor. It says "low in weight" and "high in viscosity"...
  2. Not all 4-doors were Fairlanes or Falcons, there were both Hardtop and Sedan versions of a 4-door Torinos. The 429 CJ motor was available (both with and without Ram Air) on all of these 4-doors (including Fairlanes and Falcons).
  3. The Horseless Age (10/16/07) reported that "The Motorcar Company, of Detroit, announces that the 1908 Cartercar will be identical with the 1907 design. It is claimed that because of the great satisfaction given by the latter model in the hands of users and the lack of changes suggested the company does not feel that its previous product can be improved." While that was generally true, the lamps and front fender shields make it more likely to be a 1908 rather than a 1907.
  4. Agree - it is a 1908 Cartercar Model A or Model F. nzcarnerd would you please post a link to the facebook post?
  5. http://www.paperpulleys.com/pages/special.html
  6. https://nixonauctioneers.proxibid.com/Farm-Machinery-Implements/Antique-Farm-Machinery-Implements/Metz-22-Huckster/lotInformation/56892279#topoflot
  7. Really nice video. It is really great how you took the time to show all of the mechanicals and provided explanation where needed. It is really nice getting both the ride footage and the detailed chassis overview in the same video. Some of us really want to see everything to understand it better and you provided that. Looking forward to your next one.
  8. There are at least 50 Cartercars still around (not all in running condition though). The three cars above are all really nice examples. It must be a big year for Cartercars - at least 6 have already been sold this year and at least 2 others will be offered for sale/auction later this year.
  9. It would be great to see some more photos from the trip and the Metz Gathering.
  10. The friction drive patents are interesting. In another example of how government works, the Patent Office issued a friction drive transmission patent to both Carter and Lambert on the same day in 1904: https://patents.google.com/patent/US761384A/en https://patents.google.com/patent/US761146A/en Not surprisingly, lawsuits and counter suits ensued between Cartercar and Lambert. The Lambert patent primarily focused on the friction disc and wheel surfaces, in particular the use of aluminum on the friction disc, while the Carter patent focused more on the complete drive setup. My suspicion is that Lambert got the best of the aluminum argument because Cartercar switched to another alloy even though they made claims of using aluminum first. You can see the alloy disc in a picture above. I have found about 45 makes that used a friction drive transmission but I'm sure there are more to be found...
  11. Thanks for posting it. The 1909-1911 Metz Plan Car had a two cylinder motor.
  12. I'd like to know more about the Canadian fender differences. Are there any other pictures? When did the unique fenders start - at the beginning of Canadian serial numbers in 1913? (were they really making their own fenders then?)
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