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T-Head

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Everything posted by T-Head

  1. This is one of four 1934 Ford chassis display photos we have up on The Old Motor along with an entertaining video (a couple of previews are below) about the 1934 Ford assembly. These are just some of the photos that we are posting for The Henry Ford Museum that are all linked together for easy viewing.
  2. The Farman 1923 A6A Super – Sport: This interesting streamlined design was built by the Farman company of France and was introduced in 1919 at the Paris Salon. The model A6, carried with a 6.6 liter six – cylinder engine, with an ohc cylinder head driven by a vertical shaft and bevel gears and a stated 200 b.h.p. We have a very interesting post about it filled with more photos @ The Farman 1923 A6A Super – Sport | The Old Motor
  3. Editors note: We are proud of Paul Russell and Company and not only because they restored the 1928 Mercedes-Benz 680S Saoutchik Torpedo Roadster 2012 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance Best of Show Winner this year for Paul and Judy Andrews. The other reasons are; because they also employ McPherson College graduates who helped with the project, afterwards they also used to car for a very successful fundraiser for student apprenticeship travel and accommodations you can learn about. Stop by The Old Motor where you can read an article by Maria Writesel all about the fundraiser. There are also many
  4. It is all very sad and unfortunate about what has happened in Detroit, with the rest of the auto industry and with others elsewhere. Unfortunately the one constant in life and time good or bad is change and that is what we are all witnessing. Detroit will never be the same but it appears to be slowly coming back in other ways. Many thanks to all for your input, here and on The Old Motor.
  5. We have put together a post on The Old Motor using photos above from the Detroit Free Press showing the past and the sad state of affairs at the Packard Plant today. The situation that whole complex is in, remains very serious and it now appears that the great majority of it may end up being razed. Take the time to stop by and see many more photos of the plant at its prosperous times and today, close to death after being taken off of life support. You can also see the many incredible photos and a video that we have linked to on the Detroit Free Press website that YOU NEED TO SEE. Just scr
  6. Here is one of my wife's gardens with some of the things I made for her out of junk. The 2nd photo above shows a door knob tree tree (a couple of knobs have frozen and cracked off), the 3rd a sewing machine gear on top of a bunch of rings welded together. The 4th a cultivator disc on top of a very junk (cracked) Model T crankshaft. She likes frogs so this combo frog bath - shower got made out of an old satellite dish. All this is worth its weight in gold as she loves things like this for XMass and while she is working in her gardens I work in the shop.
  7. Mad for Speed – Joan Newton Cuneo: Author Elsa A. Nystrom has written for us a great overview with wonderful photos of her upcoming book on Cuneo, the first American woman racing driver. She was an extraordinary woman who in 1910, even set a women’s speed record of 112mph on the Long Island Motor Parkway in the Pope-Hartford Hummer. See it on The Old Motor.
  8. Thanks to an arrangement with The Henry Ford, The Old Motor will will be bringing you photos from the collection showing Ford Motor Company and other early automobiles in the factory, on the road and in the repair shop. The 1934 Ford V-8 photo (above) gives you an idea of the quality, but we also have T's & A's in a post on The Old Motor and all of these and the earlier Henry Ford Photos are linked together to make it easy to find them.
  9. The Calometer above on a Model T Ford and the wild neon-lighted Boyce Moto Meter below are two of 10 different designs that we have featured on Moto Meter feature Part II on The Old Motor.
  10. Many of you have asked me to continue this series, this week we will move into the care and feeding of a locomotive, as a young lad starts out at the bottom of the trade as a cleaner. The cleaners do just that, as periodically a locomotive in England was cleaned and polished. Harry Truin also attends classes and goes onto learn the trade of being a fireman, where he feeds the boiler with coal and attends to the other duties necessary to help the driver. In this film we will also watch as Jim Hawkins already trained as a fireman, moves onto the next stage of his career, that of learning how to
  11. Thanks for posting the photos of your Calometer, as I want to do another post on The Old Motor about some of the other brands that are available. If anyone has any other interesting units let me know and I will include then in the next feature.
  12. After getting started on replacing the thermometer on the early unit shown here, we were interested in finding out more about its history, design and use and have posted a detailed article you will find interesting on the Moto-Meter at The Old Motor. We have dug deep and come up with many period articles, letters and ads and have also learned much more about it in the process. Also covered in multiple photos, are an early and a later (teens) unit as seen above.
  13. Thanks to all for dating the newest car. Did you notice the two bathtub Nash's?
  14. The 1959 Curtiss-Wright Model 2500 Air-Car seen (above) was an off shoot of research and development for military uses by the company. They described the Air-Car as a completely new method of transportation that successfully met the needs for a vehicle that could travel over unobstructed land, across water or over surfaces that will not support wheeled vehicles. Because or its versatility, the Air-Car opened up a new era in the trans-portation of passengers and cargo in a wide variety of industrial uses. On The Old Motor we have many more photos along with all the specs of this neat "Car" and
  15. This is one of three enlargements of a photo we have up on The Old Motor. This street scene in St. Louis, Missouri, taken in the early 1950s, shows us the busy intersection of Vandeventer (US 50) and Market (US 40) looking northeast. The brick building on (left) hand side, is the Fruehauf Trailer Company factory branch. On the (right) hand side is a Mohawk Tire store. We are trying to date this photo by the newest car to be seen here, check this photo out and the other two enlargements and let us know what you see here?
  16. Thousands of you enjoyed "A Study in Steel" a film all about making a locomotive. Don't miss the second part "General Repair" Where you can see a locomotive totally rebuilt in 12 days. Check it out at The Old Motor.
  17. Soon, probably after the first of the year we are going to have a fund raiser for the McPherson College Restoration Program on The Old Motor, where people will be able to donate directly to the school towards tools or buy an item for them. Many of the items they need are expensive but you can also contribute as little as $5 and they will put it in a fund to buy the most needed things on the list. Below is a list of some of the things they need, keep it in mind for when we have the fund raiser. Just remember the young fellows we help today will be carrying on for us in the future. We will anno
  18. Glad all of you enjoyed it, over 5000 viewers stopped by yesterday to see it and we will post more of the series in the future.
  19. I don't know how to upload a video here but this is a film you guys need to watch. In the film you will be able to witness some extraordinary scenes showing the pouring of huge iron and steel castings. Also featured is the art of forging alloy steel to produce the many high-strength parts needed in locomotive practice. The photos below show a few scenes......Check it out here. Leave a comment if you liked it as I may post more here in the future if you guys enjoyed it?
  20. A caution to anyone that has to put any engine bigger or longer than a small V-8 into a stand that only supports it off of the front half of the bell-housing on the back of the engine . In the engine rebuilding industry there are many known cases of this area warping and cracking and causing misalignment of the transmission to the engine and causing the clutch to not be able to release later on or problems w/torque converters. They have also been known to tip over so be very careful!!!! The one above that Matt Harwood shows looks to be better than most. The best way is a stand like we use here
  21. [TABLE=class: tborder, width: 100%, align: center] <tbody>[TR] [TD=class: alt1, bgcolor: #F2F2F2]After a one and a half year search, we were finally able to buy a press photo that we have been searching for, that has proved to be elusive until now. The photo shows the Goodyear Puritan mooring to the top of a Goodyear Zeppelin Corp 1929 Buick Bus, at the Washington D.C. Airport on November 23, 1930. We also found a short film w/it and the Buick in it. The Buick was used to help it build up speed during take off, before releasing it. After it was moored to the Buick when landing, they use
  22. I agree with Trullyvintage and I have never had any problems on either a 24' or my present 22' with heavy loads and long distances. I also use 16" wheels and tires on 5000 lb. axles, 60-65 mph is the most you should be running. Trailer manufacturers also recomend the same maximum speeds in their manuals. What tire size are you running and what are the axles rated at Bob?? For anyone out there thinking of getting a trailer don't buy shop by price. Cheap trailers have 3500 lb axles and wheels and tires that are to small. Upgrade to a min. of 5000 lb axles and 16" wheels. For heavy weights and h
  23. I can't get these videos to post her here but you are sure to enjoy The Story of Gasoline Part I above. And The Story of Gasoline Part II below Both which you can find on theoldmotor.com
  24. This is quite an exceptional and modern Mobil station which was situated right near Disneyland’s parking lot in Anaheim, CA. The station, which was photographed in 1956, with its modern, single-post supported canopies was designed by the architects Whitney Smith and Wayne Williams. On The Old Motor we have more fine photos by the noted photographer Julius Schulman along with more info and links about it.
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