ROD W

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Everything posted by ROD W

  1. Finished the wood for the tub and the back seat, Well nearly (Still got the seat base and slats to go ) The tub is not bolted into position yet as it will need to be moved forward slightly once all the door gaps are right.
  2. Finally got back to working on the 25-55. This project went on the back- burner for a number of years. As I aquired a couple/ few other cars, new and old. Also a move interstate, to the farm which is 900km/560miles away, which involved also moving the cars and all of our furniture. Then having to return home due to work commitments for both myself and my wife. One positive out of this is I got under the house cemented before moving anything back, so now don,t have to work on a wet dirt floor after heavy rain ?.
  3. William, Congratulations on your new purchase. The four door sedan, Model 27 -27 was the second most popular Buick in 1927, with a production of 40,272 for domestic sales and a further 1,448 for export, out of a total production of 255,160. This figure was not passed again until 1940.
  4. Norm, I would say its the agents plate. The left side of the dash is where they usually attached them. My 25 was a South Aust car, so Eyes & Crowle were the Agents. That car is close to me, so I,ll go around and have a look
  5. Hugh, You don,t think using the original spring wire, would hold the rope in place.
  6. Norm, Here,s a 23 on Gumtree. Located in Bundaberg. Got the tub and back doors. Unfortunately doesn,t look like any wood. Its always good to have spares. Can deliver for cost of fuel if your interested.
  7. I wouldn,t mind that body for a 1920 chassis/frame that I have. With that engine conversion, maybe it should be in the modified section.
  8. Gavin, If the universal isn,t badly worn, I would leave it in place. I have been rebuilding a right hand gearbox. A couple that I picked up have been broken, probably from trying to remove the universal and the rear housing.
  9. Its not a Buick. I think Leif is right about a Studebaker. Here,s a 1916
  10. Kyle, All the best with your car. It will be a spectacular car when finished. Being on the 124 inch chassis/frame, it is the Model 22-54 Sport Roadster. . It was introduced in January 1922. Your car was advertised on craigslist back in January 2017. It shows the door hinges in this photo.
  11. What is the wheelbase. The 23-54 was on a 124 inch wb and the 23-44 was on a 118 inch wb. Both of these were the 6 cylinder.
  12. ADade, I,m not familiar with the 1918 four cylinder, but all Buicks I have worked on have an inspection plate at the top of the flywheel/gearbox bell housing. Remove the floorboards, remove the plate and the clutch can be easily seen.. A multi disc clutch looks very different to a cone clutch. These photo,s are not 1918 but show the inspection plate.
  13. There has been a lot of discussion on these starter/generators in the past on this forum. Go back over previous topics. But as Brian said, to start with check the brushes. Remove the cover on the back of the s/g, get somebody to stomp on the starter pedal and check that the generator brushes are disengaging and the starter brushes are engaging. Also ensure the battery is fully charges and all the connections are tight including the earth/ground.
  14. This 1920 was for sale recently. Had a nice conversion from a tourer. The add said it was bought this way by the original owner. , But it was probably converted by the dealer for sale to farmers in the area.
  15. K - 6 - 44 - 45, K stands for the year 1920. 6 is 6 cylinder, 44 is the 3 seat roadster, 45 is the 5 seat tourer.
  16. These doors are very heavy. Even the tourer,s hinges had two bolts going through the wood and baking plate. Attached to this was the brace going down to main timber sill and a brace to the firewall. This all prevented the door from sagging. This bracket was also bolted to the metal dash panel to stop side movement. I know the sedan is different to the tourer, but the doors are much heavier and I am sure there would be some sort of bracing to the firewall and floor. I would give that middle hinge extra bracing to be safe. You wouldn,t want the door falling off.
  17. That,s right. The chassis flexes. The body is bolted to the chassis. There needs to be a some give in the body. There are metal brackets giving support to the wooden frame in a number of places, which I feel are better than gluing joints.
  18. On mine the wire enters from the side, as in the left photo. There is a left and right drum for 1924 and 1925 but I think the lens,s are the same.
  19. Brenden, The lights for the Master were larger than the standard lights. On the 25 -55 they were all Nickel. I would just pick a matching pair of reflectors that fit the drums. The Lens on mine are 8 3/8 Osgood Lens,s
  20. Norm, American Ash is a beautiful timber to work with, but you might find it hard to get and expensive. You can use, Tassie Oak or Vic Ash which are neither an oak or an ash but an Aussi eucalypt. Don,t use one of the local hardwoods such as Spotted Gum, they are too hard and too difficult to work with. I,m using Merbau on my 25-55. This is a New Guinea timber, Nice to work with and I can get it at the local timber yard. It does tend to split a bit on shorter cross grain sections but I laminate most pieces anyway which prevents splitting, and the place I get my timber usually has already laminated timber in stock, which is great for those small shapped pieces. I glue up all my shorter pieces, ensure good overlaps.
  21. Norm When you start to do the wood, I like to set the body up on a 2.4 x 1.2 m sheet of ply. The shape of the main body rails can be drawn and the location of the door posts and centre posts can be marked in. This shape can then be cut out as a pattern for your chassis rails. RatFink has a 22-35 which would have the same body as your 23-35, so he may be able to give you the top and bottom, body widths at the front of the tub, the centre posts and the cowl. You can see how Kevin ( Oregon Desert ) has set up the body of his car with no wood. I run lengths of flat steel from the tub to the cowl to get a nice curve and this also holds doors or wood, temporarily in place. You can use threaded rod to hold these at the correct width across the body. You can see how Kevin has used timber across the top of his centre pillars to hold the body at the correct width.When the body is in place I cut patterns out of ply to the shape of the curve of the body.
  22. Norm, Do have any of the original wood for the body. for patterns. The chassis and running gear look in very good condition. Are you planning on leaving in original condition and just refurbishing or a full strip down.
  23. Plenty of literature on ebay. Here,s a pic of a 23-41 in a show room or motor show. and this reference book shows all the models for 23