Vila

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About Vila

  • Rank
    Senior Member
  • Birthday 04/11/1950

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    http://www.jakegingervila.wixsite.com/bobs-vintage-cars-

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  • Gender:
    Male
  • Location:
    Mechanicsburg, PA
  • Interests:
    1933 and earlier Chevrolets, all British sports cars, old BMWs, Vespas and home improvements.

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  • Biography
    Retired USAF/ANG EC-130 Navigator

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  1. Your parts are a thermostat housing for a 1930 - 34 Chevrolet and could also be for later years, but my parts manual only goes up to 1934. 3063255 is the upper half for 1929 - 34, but your lower half 3053265 is only for 1930 - 34. This Thermostat housing was only used when the car had the optional Interior Heater. You will notice the right side of the bottom half of your housing has a hole where you are supposed to screw a nipple in to connect the return water hose that runs to the firewall. The hot water supply hose connects to another part that screws into the back of the cylinder head where the temperature gauge sensor screws in. That part screws in first and provides another nipple for the supply water hose and then the temperature gauge sensor screws into the top of that part. This is the original way Chevrolet designed the parts to supply hot water to the optional interior car heater, but you will see people attempt to connect a heater using other methods that don't usually work as well.
  2. I have to agree with you Jeff. Since the first time a saw a picture of one the 1906 to 1910 American Underslungs have always been my favorite.
  3. I work 1/4 mile from Librandi's at Harrisburg IAP (KMDT) and have had all my Nickel and Chrome plating done by them. Like Mark, I have never been disappointed and they are worth the wait. For me it has normally taken 3 to 4 months. The question to ask yourself when getting parts plated is to you want a good job or a quick job. I many cases you will not get both.
  4. Did you look for the serial number plate mounted on the floor just below the right front corner of the front seat and under the floor mat just inside the door sill. That is where it is located on my 1933 Chevrolet and that is where the info I found on google showed it when I did an image search of "where is a 1940 Chevrolet serial number located"
  5. The color looks great to my 70 year old eyes. There was a topic on the Vintage Chevrolet Club of America 1933 thru 1936 forum approximately a year about the original engine color for 1930s Chevrolet engine. Someone asked what the original color of gray was used and the consensus of the answer was "Yes". Yes meaning Chevrolet used several suppliers and depending on the factory where the engine was built, the engine paint supplier, and paint batch the gray color could be different. Same supplier and different batches could even be a different gray color.
  6. There may be a spiral shaped spring behind each escutcheon that would have pressed the interior door panel out against the escutcheon and handle so the door panel would not flex to reveal any gaps.
  7. I remember those vehicles, my son used to play with them. One minute it is a car or truck and with a few twists it be comes a super hero. Designed by kids from the Transformer generation.
  8. I understand the complaint about the toll costs. I am just trying to figure out why you would use the turnpike for these trips when I-83 north to Rt 322 would be just as fast if not quicker with no tolls.
  9. Vila

    VIN

    Mercer09, are you referring to a specific state with reference to some of your comments. The reason I ask is that I bought a 1962 vehicle several years ago that was registered using only the engine number on the Title and I completed paperwork to get it changed to what the manufacturer referred to as the Chassis Number, which had a very unique format that started with the vehicle model number following by a unique 7 digit number. What we know of ast the standardized VIN did not actually appear until 1981. VINs were first used in 1954 in the United States. From 1954 to 1981, there was no accepted standard for these numbers, so different manufacturers used different formats. ... In 1981, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration of the United States standardized the format. Prior to the standardized VIN each manufacturer used there own methods for creating their vehicles serial numbers. 1. The manufacturers Serial Number, sometimes referred to by other names like Commission Number. 2. The chassis number 3. The engine number 4. A combination that includes part of the vehicle model number and the last few digits of the vehicles actual serial number. 5. Could be others Prior to the standardized VIN, the non-standardized serial number was not alway a good method for identifying a vehicle, since two manufactures could have produce vehicles with the same exact number. Vasquez7al, if you can't find any complete number on the car that matches the title, is there any chance your title number could be a combination of the vehicles Model number and several of the last few digits from a number you can find on the car?
  10. Vila

    1932 Roadster

    I and I reproductions is another, and they are located in California. https://iandireproduction.com/CHEVY-CAR-PARTS_c_215.html
  11. 63RedBrier The best fit for you in retirement will depend on numerous factors: 1. Do you like mild weather with just a few weeks that are hot mid summer and cold for 3 months in the winter or extremely hot most of the year with milder winters. 2. We all want to live in a state with low taxes. Some have State income taxes on every form of income to include retirement and Social Security that will kill you but not much else, some have no state income taxes on any form of income but other taxes (sales tax, property taxes, etc.) that will kill you, and last are the states that may have moderate taxes in some categories that are tolerable and none in others you can live with. 3. Cost of Living. Take in to account things like the cost of housing, utilities, food, auto insurance on your daily drivers, etc. 4. I generally drive my antique cars from mid March thru early November, and that gives me time to do other home projects like painting a room or two in the house, rebuilding some car parts in the shop in my basement, etc over the winter I live 25 minutes from Hershey Pa and 15 minutes from the Carlisle Fair Grounds and would not move anywhere else. I grow up 15 minutes from where I currently live and plan on retiring, except for 8 years of active duty Air Force from 1972 to 1980 where I lived in Texas, Colorado, Northern Maine, Texas again, California (two locations), New Hampshire, and Washington state in that order. The only one of those states I would ever consider moving to is New Hampshire, except is gets a little to cold for me in the winter. I like PA because: 1. It does not have extremely hot weather, we have 4 distinct seasons. 2. Each year PA is usually listed as one of the 10 states for the lowest taxes on retirees. I like that, I don't like subsidizing the government. 3. Moderate cost of living. The cost of everything listed above is in the reasonable range. 4. Places like Lancaster PA has been listed as one of the top 10 towns to live in for the entire US the last few years. So where you choose to live should depend on what best fits your personal tastes, and of course LOW TAXES. I would make a list of what is important to you and do some research on each category to see which state has the best fit.
  12. You are welcome. USAF (SAC) 1972 - 1980: KC-135A Navigator with the 509th Air Refueling Squadron Pease AFB NH and 92nd Air Refueling Squadron Fairchild AFB WA PA Air National Guard (AFSOC) Harrisburg, PA 1983 - 2005: EC-130E Navigator and the first EC-130J Combat Systems Officer (CSO) in AFSOC.
  13. My wife knows nothing about cars other then putting gas in the tank and does not like working in my garage. but will hold a part or a light if needed. I normally go to sprint car races every Friday night from March thru October and she is not a fan of most auto racing either, but she now watches Formula 1 races on TV with me and has some favorite drivers (Kimi Raikkonen, Daniel Ricciardo, Romain Grosjean). Said she will go with me next year to the Belgian Grand Prix at Spa Francorchamps. I guess I am making progress.
  14. I hate to be a jerk here, but buzzing is a rather harsh term for what I saw at the Hershey show. After flying in the military for 33 years, some on low level routes approved for flight at 300 feet Above Ground Level (AGL), I would say those guys overflying the show field at least 1,000 feet above the ground was far from BUZZING. As I recall, the FAA requirements are 500 AGL within a 2,000 ft radius of people in sparsely populated areas and 1,000 AGL in densely populated areas. Aviators generally think of BUZZING as an illegal maneuver well below the 500 or 1,000 AGL requirements in unapproved airspace.
  15. I hate to be a jerk here, but buzzing is a rather harsh term for what I saw at the Hershey show. After flying in the military for 33 years, some on low level routes approved for flight at 300 feet Above Ground Level (AGL), I would say those guys overflying the show field at least 1,000 feet above the ground was far from BUZZING. As I recall, the FAA requirements are 500 AGL within a 2,000 ft radius of people in sparsely populated areas and 1,000 AGL in densely populated areas. Aviators generally think of BUZZING as an illegal maneuver well below the 500 or 1,000 AGL requirements in unapproved airspace.