festanley

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About festanley

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  • Birthday 02/21/1957
  1. I am restoring a set of lights for a 1911 Model and I need a source for new beveled glass lenses. They are 4" x 4" square. I also need the red faceted jewel that goes in the door on a John Brown Model 85 sidelight. I will be at Hershey so if you sell these items or know of someone that does I would appreciate some more info. Alan Woolf
  2. Kudos to the Richmond Region for a great week of touring. They did a great job of having everything organized from accurate and clear directions to people placed to help direct parking. Plus we were treated to a lot of genuine hospitality. And we got to meet some new friends. Alan
  3. Want to buy four (4) front spring U bolts as shown in photo and drawing. These need to be for a two inch wide, three inch tall spring. The dimensions need to be close to what is shown but some variation might be acceptable. Please contact me by PM if you have some of these parts available. Thanks, Alan Woolf (email)
  4. Want to buy four (4) front spring U bolts as shown in photo and drawing. These need to be for a two inch wide, three inch tall spring. The dimensions need to be close to what is shown but some variation might be acceptable. Please contact me by PM or at email link below if you have some of these parts available. Thanks, Alan Woolf (email)
  5. Has registration for the 2012 Reliability Tour in Richmond begun? Earlier word was that registration would open around the 1st of May. Alan
  6. Get it soda blasted. That process very well for my American engine.
  7. The Victory Six was introduced in 1928 before Chrysler took over Dodge. It was the mid priced car in the Dodge Brothers line for 1928 and was carried over into 1929. My father has owned a 1928 sedan since 1972 when he purchased it with 8000 miles on it. It has been driven a lot over the years but never fully restored. It is one of he best and most reliable cars of the era. It has a six cylinder engine, seven main bearing with full pressure lubrication. The body was made by Budd and is all steel. Brakes are four wheel Lockheed hydraulic from the factory. They are also very attractive and probably one of the most overlooked quality cars of that era. Consequently they are inexpensive cars to buy today. Alan
  8. Congratulation Kent. I know you have been looking for an engine for some. I am glad the lead panned out. Alan
  9. I can probably muddy the waters just a bit more. The two TH engines that I have are 6 cylinder T heads. One is 4-1/2 X 6 (572 ci) and the other is 4 X 6 (452 ci). The bigger engine dates to 1915 and the smaller engine is dated 1913. The prefix on the serial number of the smaller engine is RS and the bigger engine has a T prefix on the serial number. Based on the serial numbers of the few existing engines that I have an RS, S, or T prefix seems to be pretty consistent for the big six cylinder T heads that Teetor Hartley built. The six cylinder engines introduced by TH in 1913 for the 1914 model year were probably designed by Teetor Hartley and made available to various manufacturers. The ads below show an engine that was used by Pilot in some of their cars and probably also used by other auto manufacturers. The photo shows a TH engine built for McFarlan. It was supplied by Kent. One thing interesting about these engine is that the cylinder block is symmetric and it can be rotated to change on which side of the car the intake and exhaust are placed. On the McFarlan the intake is on the left. American use the same basic engine but put the intake on the right hand side of the car. And the crankcases are common to the 452 ci and 572 ci engines The cylinder blocks are interchangeable. Earlier TH engines were basically a Continental design and produced for American Motor Car Company by the Light Inspection Car Company. Continental did not have the capacity to produce engines for American but did supply the raw castings and parts. American contracted LICC to build the engines. This is per Walt Seely's history of American in the July August 1972 AACA magazine. Alan
  10. Want to buy a differential cover only as used on the 1928-29 DB Victory and Standard series cars. See photos. Bolt circle is 11-5/8 inches and there are 10 bolt holes in the cover. Alan Woolf americanunderslung@earthlink.net
  11. Want to buy a differential cover only as used on the 1928-29 DB Victory and Standard series cars. See photos. Bolt circle is 11-5/8 inches and there are 10 bolt holes in the cover. Alan Woolf americanunderslung@earthlink.net
  12. Kent, Did you get any under hood photos? Alan
  13. Just FYI I am a Stanley owner and have been playing with them for 25+ years. The vehicle shown in the ad appears to be built on a 735 or 740 Stanley chassis. The body is something someone created and it is not even a good representation of an express body. Plus there were no express trucks built with flat front condensers. Also the express trucks had 30hp engines. I feel pretty confident the car shown is a 20hp chassis. The Stanley express trucks were the same as Mountain Wagon without the seats. Mountain Wagons were built through 1915 or 16 and all that exist are non-condensing even though Stanley built touring cars and roadsters starting in 1915 with condensers. There are more places to look for information. I will offer some links below. Pay particular attention to the Stanley Online register. He has lots of info and pictures and some current sales information. Stanley Register Online Stanley Motor Carriage - Stanley Steam Cars - Stanley Steamers steam car club Alan
  14. Boilers are running around 5K. This car is basically a 735 or 740 Stanley chassis with a pretty crude body. Mid 20's would be a pretty big price especially if you had to replace the boiler. Plus I think it would be a hard one to sell if you evey needed to. There is just too much that is not Stanley. Alan