rockitdoc

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Everything posted by rockitdoc

  1. Got it! Thanks. FYI, the adjuster on the passenger side needs to be turned counterclockwise as you are looking at the adjuster from the front of the car (or up) to loosen the brake shoes, ie, move them away from the drum. It took three clicks of the star wheel and the drum turns with just the slightest drag. Thanks everyone for all your help! Scott
  2. Sure enough! Access hole at the bottom of the backing plate. I never would have found it under the crud if you guys hadn't told me it was there. Many thanks! Now, if I can get it to move and back off the shoes it will be a great day! Lots of penetrating oil, coming up.
  3. I will look for a hole in the backing plate to see if the adjuster can be accessed that way. I didn't see anything like this earlier, but wasn't looking for it. It also appears from the photo that the adjuster is not at the bottom of the backing plate, but at an angle. Is that correct?
  4. Agreed. Few things are when you know how to do it! What drum nut? Where are adjusters? Like I said, this is new to me. Not obvious. Give me a 1960 BSA Gold Star, Norton Commando or BMW R90S and I can cruise. Thanks, Scott
  5. Wheel won't move. That's the problem.
  6. Bear with me, I am obviously not a 41 Connie expert. How does one 'back off the adjuster' Is the adjuster the large hex nut at the very top of the front backing plate? I don't see any other obvious bits on the backing plate that could be the adjuster. Unfortuneatly, my parts catalog isn't much help.
  7. "....bearings in place and secured,..." Not sure what you mean here. S
  8. The right front brake on my '41 Continental sticks. I would like to remove the drum to repair but cannot figure out how best to get it off. I suspect springs and/or wheel cylinder are the culprits, but don't know. Thanks, in advance, as usual. Scott
  9. The starter in my '41 Connie has trouble turning car over. Battery is fully charged. Cables are large and clean with good contact. New solenoid. Starter is rebuilt but unknown by whom. Begin investigation with starter for troubleshooting? Crap. Wrong forum. Sorry.
  10. So, I got all the hardware off to remove the interior door panel except the push button. How does one remove this item? Thanks, in advance. S
  11. That is going to be tough. Molestation has been rampant, if not the rule.
  12. Good question. Logic would say yes, but that doesn't always follow with these. Maybe someone else can help here. My car was sitting in a field for years before I got her and in pretty bad shape, so hard to tell.
  13. Join the LZOC. You won't find better info anywhere. BTW, your car is one of the first 'unibodies' Frame and body are one. Makes it a bit more 'challenging'.
  14. This OD wiring diagram shows an early and late version. The only difference appears to be the 'solenoid actuating coil' and solenoid holding coil' between pin #4 and ground for the early version vs a straight pin #4 to ground for the late version. How would I know if my solenoid requires the 'actuating and holding' coils since both coils appear to be three pins? [ATTACH=CONFIG]287927[/ATTACH] My car is an early model, but the solenoid was replaced, so it's not original. Any clues appreciated. Scott
  15. This OD wiring diagram shows an early and late version. The only difference appears to be the 'solenoid actuating coil' and solenoid holding coil' between pin #4 and ground for the early version vs a straight pin #4 to ground for the late version. How would I know if my solenoid requires the 'actuating and holding' coils? My car is an early model, but the solenoid was replaced, so it's not original. Any clues appreciated. Scott
  16. My '41 Continental has the Warner OD unit. I have the wiring diagram from Warner that shows a 4 pin relay (mine is 5 pin) and a 2 pin solenoid (mine is 3 pins). Question is: what are the extra pins on the relay and solenoid supposed to connect to?:confused: Thanks, in advance. S
  17. Hi everyone, Well, time to get the OD wired and working on my Dad's '41 Connie and ran into a small snag....I hope. My relay on the firewall has 5 terminals and my solenoid down on the Warner has 3 terminals. But, my Warner OD manual only shows 4 wires to the relay and 2 wires to the solenoid. So, that either means 1) I have the wrong manual , 2) the manual is in error, :confused: 3) one terminal on each device is not used (this is what I hope the answer is ) 4) I have the wrong relay and the wrong solenoid (I hope not) :mad:, or 5) some combination of these I would prefer not to bore you with. Any help out of this dilemma most appreciated. She really wants the OD to work the next time we venture down the highway. Thanks, as always, in advance. S
  18. I had (and still have) this issue with mine when hot. Turns over cold fine. Drive until heated up and try to restart and starter drags and sometimes won't turn it. Turns out (ha!) that my starter and flywheel gear were not aligned and had a 'high' spot where the starter would bind. Had to do some red-neck adjustments of the mounting holes to get better alignment. Now, it works better, but not fixed. I'll take her apart next summer and try to do it right. Hopefully, it won't mean removal of that lump of an engine. BTW, I went through all the usual 6volt cable and extra tight connections issues first. Also replaced the relay and rebuilt the starter.
  19. The Warner is pretty complex and some of the bits are spendy (ask me how I know). But, it is essentially an automatic. Shift it into OD and forget it.
  20. Maybe the lower ratio was put in Lincolns to give them similar acceleration since they would have been heavier than Fords?
  21. As you probably know, any history like famous or notorious previous owners can increase value quite a bit. Do you have documentation of the previous owners? Any feathers in the back seat?
  22. I am no expert, but the '41 Connie I inherited last year was 'already restored' to driver status by my late father starting out in the condition you show with yours. I have receipts from his files that indicate he put about $35k into it just to get it drivable. I put another $10k into it to make it a 'reliable? driver' but I estimate it will take me another $30k easily to make it a 'nice driver'. These numbers are all based on us doing it ourselves, with little or no pro help, except those on this forum (who have all been great). So, I think your $50k estimate is ambitious for a restoration. $80-100 is probably more like it, especially for a convert. Here's a picture of her. Looks good from 50 feet, but close up she needs a lot of metal work for all the panels to fit right. Rust was really rampant. These cars are rare classics (probably only 700-800 of yours built) and it would be a shame to cut her up and build a custom, especially one that is restorable, like yours. I personally believe machines of this ilk should be preserved. Do resto-mods on more common machines that can found anywhere and aren't historically significant. If money is the only motivation, a custom might get you to the break-even point, but probably not a profit. A '42 Connie convert is an odd-duck and might not bring much even well sorted as a custom. So, if you're thinking this way, I'd sell her as-is, pocket the $15-25k you could get and let someone else restore her. Just my $0.02. BTW, my sons and I are also into road racing, competing in a '60 Bugeye.