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Scooter Guy

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Everything posted by Scooter Guy

  1. Agreed value insurance (not stated value) is what you want. Call a reputable agreed value car insurance company and see what sort of "agreed" value you come up with. That will give you your ultimate answer. They're usually pretty happy to let you overvalue your vehicles (within reason) so long as you pay the premiums for doing so. No messing with appraisers, price guides, auction results or any of that. At the end of the day the only thing that really matters anyway is what agreed value you and the insurance company come up with, so why not just go to them first?
  2. I've watched both episodes. A run down of the second episode (Olds 442 "restored"): "Dad" goes into his personal garage and decides to drive his Olds 442 to work. This reminds him that he's got a Olds 442 sitting outside in his private yard. He and the son disagee about the fate of the cars sitting in the private yard...son wants to sell parts, but dad wants to keep them in tact. This goes on for a couple of minutes while they look over the 442. They tow it back to the shop where they tell the crew they have 3 weeks to "restore" the car and they're told it needs to be 100% original as it left
  3. The show is reported to be called "American Restoration" and will debut on Monday, Oct. 25th sometime between Pawn Stars and American Pickers. I do hope that it is actually about restoration, but tend to doubt that sort of show would last long. Just like American Chopper...it's all about the drama. There is maybe 10 minutes of actual bike building that happens in a 60 minute episode. The same thing happened with the now defunct American Hot Rod series. Quite frankly I've been disappointed by what I've seen Rick do on Pawn Stars. There is the infamous Coke machine incident, for example, in whi
  4. That is great to hear. I certainly didn't mean to insult you with my previous posting. You have a wonderful machine that sounds to me as if it is in good hands. Best, Tom
  5. As silverghost said, you need to find a conservator. Contact your local art or history museum and ask to speak with a curator or collections manager. They should be able to give you a reference to a freelance conservator. The largest museums have conservators on staff and well equipped labs and may be willing to take the project on for you, on the side, in return for a donation to the museum, or the like. Be warned though, you get what you pay for. Top drawer work isn't cheap. My wife's in the museum business (collections/curatorial), so I'll ask her tonight if she's got any specific leads in
  6. I would encourage you to restore the Cushman-Vespa to original specs, as it left the factory. If you want modern electronics, lights, ignitiion, electric start, and enough reliability for an everyday rider, get a modern Vespa like an LX-150 or the Genuine Buddy 125. My "rider" is a 2002 Vespa ET-4 150cc four stroke. It's an automatic with disc brakes, electric start, etc. I can ride it and enjoy it without worrying about it like most of my vintage scooters. The Cushman-Vespa is too rare to modify.
  7. Yep. I always dig through them when I come across a group from that time frame. So far I haven't spotted anything other than ads for lots of other scooters, go-karts, etc. I do have some Western Auto and Gambles catalogs with the scooters, but that's about it for original ads I have. I have photocopies of lots of stuff that I know is out there but haven't found yet. I was hopeful that someone here might have something they'd be willing to part with.
  8. They were built 1946-1948 by the Beam Manufacturing Company in Webster City, Iowa and were sold nationwide through the stores and catalogs of Gambles Hardware (as Hiawathas) and Western Auto (as Western Flyers). I would guess that quite a few folks here owned one or knew someone that did when they were growing up. The scooter pictured is a mid-production model, so I'd place it at '47-'48. The production runs didn't correspond directly to any given year, just 4 production runs of 10,000 scooters during that time frame, so except for the very early ones and the very late ones, it is almost impo
  9. Want to buy: Doodle Bug scooter items Seeking advertisements, brochures, service manuals, parts manuals, etc. pertaining to Doodle Bug Scooters. PM with details and I will respond as soon as possible.
  10. What is a "power frame" in reference to a Cushman? I've never heard that term used. :confused:
  11. You know, your best option may be to try to snag a parts machine so that between the two bikes you can build up one really nice one that is complete. It is about the only way to get the correct parts for these. Fortunately these aren't too expensive yet. I'd think you'd be able to purchase a parts machine for less than $250 that still have some useable items on it.
  12. I've been watching the show as I grew up in the area where they operate and do most of their "picking." What is shown on the show only scratches the surface of what's out there in that part of the world. They seem to go to great lengths to not show too much of the surrounding area so that people can't figure out where all of these places are, but every now and then there are clues. One of the two pickers, Mike, like vintage motorcycles and scooters. He has a small collection of them and considers himself a Vespa "collector" and can be seen riding a Vespa GS every now and then. It was kinda fu
  13. Does your Cushman look like this? If so, it is a Trailster, made in two versions. The first is '60-'61 and the second is '62-'65. Dennis Carpenter Reproductions can supply any of the parts that you might need to get up and running. If you have an actual Tote Gote (which are not made by Cushman), your bike would look something like this (several models existed): Hope this helps a little!
  14. Please post a picture of the machine in question. Once I positively know the application I might be able to help.
  15. Thanks for sharing! Great photos! The piano, however, is a Bosendorfer, a legendary piano built in Vienna, Austria.
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