ahhh65riv

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About ahhh65riv

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  1. For the trac bar bushing- go to Classicbuicks part #RTBB6370. One of the experts around here will have to vouch for the "improved design" claim. I am curious myself as I need to replace mine as well. Erik
  2. I think I have to agree. I like the green interior myself. In fact I think I like it better than any other interior color other than black. I would keep it the same color, but if you insist on changing it, go with the black. One thing about black is that on those hot summer days and bare skin can be real torture! Don't go cheap when re-doing your insulation and sound deadner and I hope you've got A/C.
  3. Ah yes, of course! The good 'ol search tool! *(note to self: "Remember! The search tool is your friend!") http://forums.aaca.org/f177/body-mount-kit-297346.html This was exactly what I was looking for. Thanks! Erik
  4. Does anybody have advice, experience or preference in body bushing mounts sources for first generation Rivieras? I see both OPGI and Classic Buicks has kits. The one sold by Classic Buicks is a 24 piece kit (BMK330) for $221 and OPGI has 20 pieces (BRO1851) for $189.99. Both sources claim quality reporductions of the originals, and perhaps there are other sources to shop? Erik
  5. ...So get Allstate, and be better protected from mayhem, like me!
  6. Looks fantaaaaastic! Nice work by the way. I ended up buying a new (used in excellent shape) inner fender well. I guess that means I cheated? Erik
  7. This 65 Riv is being sold local to me on a lot here in Eugene Oregon. It is being sold on consignment and the lot owner says he is not a local and I have never seen it around. Does anyone know the owner? Send me a pm if you have any information (or a possible buyer that would like more info). 1965 Buick Rivera at Summers Classic Cars in Eugene, OR Erik
  8. Ted, I used Muratic Acid (buy from pool cleaning supply locations) to clean out my water jackets, but my engine block was bare and on a stand. I also use it for cleaning scale and any other rusty steel parts. I keep 5 gal containers for doing such stuff. There are lots of precautions when working with that stuff though! Use a respirator, rubber gloves, goggles etc. use in a well ventillated space Keep vapors away from anything else in the vicinity you dont want to start to rust after exposure Will deteriorate aluminum copper and other metals, but is ok on rubber. (isolate from radiator, aluminum water pump housings, etc. or anything else NOT steel you want to clean) Rinse thouroughly and dry afterward. Apply paint or coat with corrosion preventer of choice or will flash over with rust rapidly.
  9. Thanks! That is exactly what I needed! I was also considering just using a car dolly if I was moving chasis around (minus engine and tranny) since weight wouldn't be an issue, but it looks like they won't even fit on one. (unless the late model galvenized kind perhaps?) Heres the dolly requirements from U-haul website. Front-wheel or all-wheel drive vehicles must not weigh in excess of 3,450 lbs. Rear-wheel or four-wheel drive vehicles must not weigh in excess of 3,900 lbs and you must disconnect your driveshaft. Must have a maximum outside-to-outside tire width of 72" Must not exceed a body width (at the doors) of 75" Note: body widths over 72" must use late-model U-Haul Tow Dolly (identifiable by silver galvanized color) Thanks again! Erik
  10. Does someone have handy the outside-to-outside tire width and also outside-to-outside body width of a first gen Riv? I'm trying to spec out a trailer size I can get away with. Thanks in advance! Erik
  11. Don't feel sorry for me. Actually, that is the worst spot in the whole car as far as rust is concerned. It's been under cover for most of its life with an old Die Hard battery that leaked out. At some point, I'll attach "after" photos when I'm all done. There is a body mount right below, that's kind of a bugger though. I'll be willing to bet most of these cars has some sort of corrosion in this area. It's just hidden and not seen for the most part. Erik
  12. This is what I started with... so dont feel bad. It could be worse! I agree that is repairable! Take a wire wheel to it and hit it with the rust converter stuff and paint it with the coating of your choice. And yes there are some spot welds that attach the actual tray (removed in the photo). Its attaches to the inner fenderwell. Erik
  13. Slanted driveways (unlevel) scare the CRAP out of me! Even with proper jack stands, I have had close calls! You know your in trouble when you are under the car, when the floor jack (under the back axle) rolls as the jack stands (under the front axle) tip over and the car rolls down and no brakes to hold it! God was smiling at me that day too! Erik
  14. May I ask why-oh-why in the world would you want to put that original tar paper stuff back in? That stuff is heavy, can hold moisture and I'm not surprised they don't sell it anymore as it is probably made out of things that are found to be bad for your health. There are a lot of brands of the modern foil backed insulation that you "cut-and-tape" in. Dynamat isnt the most economical way to go. Fat Mat is about $130 for 100 sq ft You will pay at least that much for 36 sq ft (9 sheets) for the Dynamat Eastwood has their own brand a little cheaper Hushmat has several price and quality/quantity levels between the two. Or my favorite is the spray in "Lizard Skin", but that's definately not the "budget" route. There was a topic on another rodders forum where somone was recommending making their own ceramic "spray-in" sound deadener/insualtion. It is made with something developed by NASA and is inexpensive and is comercialy available called "micro balloons" added to latex paint. My own internet search led be to some interesting reading and claims on the matter. Just my nickles worth, anyway. Erik
  15. I used Duplicolor acrylic enamel semi-gloss for all of my interior plastic, dash, glove box, console etc. I am very pleased with how it turned out. It had the color (black) and sheen I was looking for. They were all done the same, so I'm not sure how that paint would match up with the original (faded) factory paint. I did however, sand it all down and was very meticulous with every coat over several months a few hours spent in the evenings. I masked off the trim and the textured laminate and removed all the instruments, gauges, switches, and vents, etc. It was well worth the time to go through and clean all the contacts and replace lamps, restore the clock, replce the felt in the vent visors, and things like that. This was very satisfying for me, but maybe you aren't looking to getting that involved in a restoration project. Erik