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Scotts_DG8

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Everything posted by Scotts_DG8

  1. Pat, That looks like it turned out great. So am I understanding it correctly that the blending paper for the most part helps match the grains and provide a starting and ending point for the woodgraining pattern? If I recall corrently the roller has the wood pattern, does the blending paper also have a wood pattern? At least one currious mind would sure like to know. Scott...
  2. A question comes to mind regarding the up coming Dodge Brothers Centennial Tour 2014 event this June. What access/activities will be open to the public? I'd seen the comments on another post here regarding the tour and just assumed (right or wrong) that it would be structured something like what the Fall AACA Hershey show was but after talking with a friend today I'm leaning it isn't like that. I personally had never attended a Dodge Brothers Club tour/meet but thought, as this meet/tour was going to be basically right in my backyard, I would get a chance to check out all the old Dodges. What my interests are would be to attend the car show and swap meet at a minimum. Scott...
  3. As we've set a few winter records here in Michigan this year it might be prudent to bring along a warm jacket just in case. But yah never know how things are going to go weather wise, everyone might be wearing shorts and complaining about the heat too. I presonally am hoping for no rain for all those that show up though. Scott...
  4. Roger, I know there is so much more work to be done but this to me is a bit of a milestone image. I really admire your skills and ability to visualize and then build something from scratch like this. Great job so far and looking forward to the many future mini milestones until this project is completed. Scott...
  5. Although not specific to the '60 Corvair mentioned in the original post, I have nothing but good memories of the '64 Monza Convertible I owned. If I had the extra room and money I'd like to own another someday. Really liked the exhaust sound shifting thru the gears with the top down. Scott...
  6. John, I always like all the different turns your activities takes you. Gregs updates on the Matheson have popped up off and on now for a long time and I find them totally interesting but I keep wondering, will it ever get done so I can hear it run? By the way your bathroom side project was a nice diversion and looks nice, real nice, you and your son did one heck of a job on that. Scott...
  7. This is the sequence/steps that I'd been advised to follow and the one also recommended from the PPG paint store where I've been getting my supplies. I can say too that this approach takes a lot of work as you'll feel like you're doing a lot of repetive work. I also think that either approach would work for you it just depend on the quality and life of the end product that you're trying to achive. Scott...
  8. I think your being more than modest there. I and maybe many others that follow your thread/progress and are restoring their own project(s) hope that they can turn out something as nice. It looks great. Scott...
  9. Not being someone that offers an opinion everytime a question of this nature is posted, I do have an opinion on this. I owned and drove numerous cars back in the day before disc brakes became common place. The longest trip was from San Diego back to Michigan and then there was to/from Hershey along with several to/from Ohio, to/from northern Michigan and on top of the trips was the normal daily driving. All the cars had drum brakes all the way around and performed just fine if not great. My opinion is; Unless someone is building a car for performance beyond that of what a normal daily driver would every had been used for, the origianl drums should be more than enough if properly maintained. As far as Staying with the Stock Drum setup being the only opinion you would find posted here I would disagree. If I were asked it would in most cases always be a starting point suggestion with trying to stay true to the technology of the vintage of the vehicle in question but sometimes parts availability can be an issue. Another issue might be the engineering of a given manufacture/model as not all cars were made the same, but I have to say at least for braking, and having owned Chevy, Pontiac, Ford, and lots of Mopars (Plymouth/Dodge/Chrysler), I've never had any issues. Again it is just my opinion but I'd driven these type of cars for years and years before getting a car with disc brakes and never had any type of braking issues. My two 60's vehicles, the '68 Dart GTS (383 w/4 Speed) and the '69 Dodge A100 Sportsman van (318) came with drum brakes and I have no plans to modify them to disc although there are kits available for both.Scott...
  10. Just trying to load a picture never loaded, if it works it is a '31 DG 8 Temp Gauge. I will say that it does show up in my reply after attaching it, but I still haven't posted it yet. It also showed up in my preview so I'm thinking that it's going to post fine. Scott...
  11. John, That's great news, I had a feeling it was going to be arriving soon. You know if I were there we'd have that installed in no time. Just lay it all out and confirm what harness go where, obviously take your time and you should have no problem getting it all done. I am curious though as there is probably a wire that goes to your dome light and am trying to think how you're going to install that behind the trim, that could be a challenge. Great news though. Scott...
  12. I've been following your project along since the start and think you are doing just an amazing job, it's looking just great. There is one thing though, I don't recall the factory using blue tape during assembly. Scott...
  13. First I had no issues using the Manage Attachments and then browsed my computer and selected a photo that I had never loaded earlier to the site here and it appears that it does post and work without issues for me. I am running Windows 7 Home Premium and Internet Explorer 9. Scott
  14. Roger, I would agree with the trunk lid as it really is the most logical progression and it for the most part finishes the main body panels in the rear of the car. It's was looking good before but with the temporary top placement it gives a lot to the body lines, looks great. Scott...
  15. John, Oh, one more point on why I was saying you thread has very much a book feel to it. It has to do with the author, your writting and story telling has grown since the start of this thread, and you can't leave out the great adventures that both you and Greg have taken us all on. As for posting photos and additonal info on my cars, photos of two of the cars have been in my gallery for almost three years and can be viewed by clicking on the images listed under my user name shown at the right of my posts. The van obviously I have the thread I've been posting to in this forum. The TR3A I only have a single picture of as it is in garage jail, that is I have it stored in the back corner of the garage and have a temporary platform built above it for parts storage. Now as far as getting into the background info on each and their status I've not had a venue to actually discuss them. Scott...
  16. No doubt that this post/thread went way off track and that was a shame. I have no problems taking a little heat as I probably could have worded my interest in the vehicle off in the distance (as mentioned and pointed out) a bit differently by not referring to anothers earlier observation and stating that although I had no knowledge of the Panhard specifically although I was/would be interested in additional info on the vehicle off in the distance. The topic of this thread "You never know what you'll come across" piqued my interest as numerous other posts/threads on the many unique/obscure vehicles that get posted here and have followed many and learn a lot, this is not the first time that someone had stated an interest in another vehicle appearing in a posted photo. In my case my personal interest and affection for the vehicle in the distance got the better of me this time. Scott...
  17. John, It's been a bit of time since I commented on your thread even though I check it out every time you post an update. The trailer looks real nice BTW and I'm sure you'll get a lot of use out of it. I also had a thought though while reading this update what it was that I truely enjoyed following along your thread. I guess it boils down to it's the simple nature of the thread and content, not 100 percent car related but more like a reading a good book. Every time you pick it up (see what the current post is about) it's like a new chapter and following along with the many characters. Sometimes it's a mystery and at times a thriller, there is drama, humor, and the rocket science/MacGyver guy (Greg) shows up now and then to show/tell all of us how it's done or should/could be done. In gerneral it's a great thread. How I got off on that line of thought tonight I've no idea and although it not always good to say what you think, this time I guess I just had to share. Scott...
  18. Dang Keiser that was the first question that came to mind when I looked at the picture.
  19. Roger, having a drivable vintage automobile at the end of a restoration without question has many positive points. The beauty of the model though is the gas, insurance, storage and maintenance doen't exist and in most cases can be admired by any/all visitors without a trip to a garage or show. I would also believe that the total costs of the model are a fraction of the cost of a total restoration of an actual vehicle. After following along with you and your creation I've pretty much thought that at some point in my life I sure would like to attempt a scale model along the lines of the ones you have done. I'm pretty sure it would apease my need to craft/build things. I've also learned much too just following along and will continue to do so until the project completion which I am looking forward to along with many others here. Scott...
  20. Me too Roger, it's amazing to look at. And even though there is much much more to come the combined shot of (frame/floor/fenders) puts all your efforts into a totally different perspective. It's hard to imagine how much work and patience goes into your model, it's got to be a lot harder then a total real restoration. Scott...
  21. Pat, It's just got to be a great feeling when you sit behind the wheel but it's got to be almost as good to see all your efforts captured and published for all to see. Many happy miles and smiles to come. Scott...
  22. I'm don't recall seeing the name of the color shown in the pictures but it looks great. If you don't mind me asking a couple questions; Is this a single stage paint? Could you mention who the paint is from? Thank's Scott...
  23. Gary, it's good to hear from one and all that have taken the time to follow my efforts on this project. I'm glad that you, and everyone else reading this (or just looking at the pictures is ok too) found an interest in what I've choose to tackle. There are still many challenges ahead and the progress does slow down a bit (well maybe a lot) during the cold/wet months around winter but I'm driven to bring this to completion, hopefully a lot sooner than later. Again, thanks for checking in. Stay tuned. Scott...
  24. Thanks John and Pat for the nice comments, they mean a lot really. John, there are a few small parts/pieces that I will be working on this winter for sure, but it will be in my basement as opposed to my easy chair although I do pull the service manual out now and then while sitting here. Pat, I had thought about attempting to make one (Dog Bone floor patch) but ended up putting a request out for a clean floor piece and with some luck someone came up with it. As far as the amount of detailed work I'm putting into this, it's really become a rock and a hard place. This is not the Custom Sportsman model it's the basic Sportsman so there are no interior panels, that leaves the inside exposed as delivered from the factory. If I had all the panels I sure would be spending a lot less time but the panels of a Custom (window/wall and trim) are really hard to come by. The good news is that I'm down to doing the underside of the roof which is pretty clean (no dents to speak of just a lot of sanding) and the remaining floor section (still a number of small dents, welded up screw holes and surface rust pits to be glazed). Again, thanks for the comments. Scott...
  25. Still Sunday evening but this post contains the money shots (sure). I finished spraying the epoxy primer last night at about 7 PM and then spent just over another hour cleaning the gun and putting things away. Bottom line, it was dark last night so no night shots were to be had. I pulled it out today to check it out and this is what I saw. It look like it turned out pretty good in the pictures as you can see, but it looks better in real life:D. One of the things that I observed when spraying this side was that there are areas where my HVLP gun has a heck of a time getting into. I was hitting things left and right when I was spraying the wall section with the spare tire carrier and the brace at the bottom of the wheel well and door post, not to mention the back side of the rear door post behind the spare tire carrier. I'm not sure how I'm going to proceed when I get to spraying the color coat, I'll have to talk to the paint guy and see what my options are. So, after a big gap in updates this should give you an idea of what I've managed to accomplish. I'm not sure what will still get done this year as the forecast for the up coming week shows the temps dropping down into highs that are only in the mid 50's. There is a strong potential that this may be the last bodywork update until spring next year. I do have to admit that I am a bit disappointed that the entire inside is not in primer, let alone painted. The one thing that I had learned to this point is doing the van is a heck of a lot of work. Hope you all that have followed along enjoy the update and we'll see what comes next. Until then, thanks. Scott...
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