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Scotts_DG8

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Everything posted by Scotts_DG8

  1. Specific to the OP V-8 comment does not tie to the picture posted. I did take the engine shot and blow it up some and it does look to be a straight eight. For what it is worth...
  2. John, The JD does looks like it turned out to be a great deal and does look good to boot. I'm thinking that with all your free time, between the bathroom project, working the fields, repairing and prepping cars for the car shows you might consider putting a bit of wax on the JD to match the new hood, then it would be finished. BTW, I think that it's great that you get around and to manage to get so much accomplished. Scott...
  3. I know that when I worked at a Chrysler assemble plant as an inspector (I was only in my teens) they used a liquid ink marker along with the grease pencil. The ink marker could be refilled and came in several colors, it had a round flat tip on it. Just info for what it might be worth. Scott... BTW, Martin your doing one heck of a job and I'm one of those that really like the amount time and detail work that you're putting in to the car, all that work will show in the end.
  4. First I have no first hand knowledge of your hood latch, I have though taken a lot of obscure items apart and put them together again thru the years. Just going by your single picture, which provides a nice clear view when fully opened, I'm seeing the following. The bumper will obviously need to be removed and the rivet holding the latch base on will have to go. The challenge will be to deal with the internal spring, but maybe not. after the bottom latch base is removed I'm thinking the top cap/handle could be seperated from the barrel body and the bottom pin looks like it should fit thru the bottom to slide barrel body off. You will have to come up with new rivets and maybe a body bumper. Those are my first thoughts. Scott...
  5. Spy shots are good too, actually any progress shots that can be taken and shared are great. You have to realize that although we all are a bunch of spectators we are also can be a really good cheer team. I can do the rah, rah with all the rest, just don't ask me to do the splits. Oh, and thanks for the photos. Scott...
  6. John, a friend had a 318 which had both front and rear PTO's. The mower deck looks just like the one he had and after used it to cut his lawn a couple times (2 1/2 acres) and thought it was a pretty nice tractor. He also had the trailer, plow blade and the 2-stage blower for the front. You got a heck of a good deal. And the olded Ariens 2-stage blower you picked up is another good deal. I couldn't quite read the lable on it but it looked like it said 824. I have a 724 and it had a heck of a workout this past winter. My only issue with the 724 is that the auger and the auger housing was ground down a half inch or more by the previous owner who did not change the skids, some day I'll find a replacement from an old broken down blower. Based on the first couple items (tractor/blower) I can't help but wonder if the rototiller just might be a Troy-Built. Scott...
  7. Not a problem on the photos, rather lack ther of. All the photos that you've posted have been great as it shows just how nice your project is coming along and the amount of detail work is being put into it. I've no question, using the photo history so far, that the end product will look great and it will be a Dodge a lot of people will be proud to own and drive. Besides, we're all pretty much a patient bunch of observers here anyway. Scott...
  8. I read somewhere that if there are no pictures then it never happened. Hint, Hint Scott...
  9. This sounds like a perfect task for one of those small videoscopes.
  10. Jeff, I do know that the person or business that does perform media balsting should have the knowledge and means of masking or covering/protecting areas that should not be blasted. The place I used did this does on several areas on my van when it was done. Also, I too have a blast cabinet although it's only 5 foot as that's all the room I could manage to allow for one. The blast cabinet is one of those items/tools that you can't imagine not having when restoring cars and/or parts after having/using one. BTW, I've followed your Metz thread and think you're doing a great job on your project, mabe it's time for another update. I guess our comments on media blasting tie in to the OP original question but I don't want to take this off track. Scott...
  11. A two car garage that I had added on and additional L shaped shop area. I have my 3 old cars and the old van stored in the original two car garage and the shop side has the compressor, blast cabinet, bench,tools, etc. The downside is that to do serious work on any car it is pulled in the driveway and put at the end of the day. The only way the limited situation will change is to elimate one or more of the vehicles which isn't currently in the plans.
  12. Jeff, I can see the problem your describing. A hind site view might be that if you had the knowledge before hand you could have used either a cardboard or luan plywood backer against the inside rib when blasting the ribs. Not sure if it would be worth the extra effort but something to consider if it ever comes up again. Just a general comment on blasting, after you've had your first project blasted I can see where one would be hard pressed to tackle another project by stripping or sanding by hand. Scott...
  13. So, it is the selection of media and the persons training/skills that determine the outcome? I would think that someone would have done some research and shop around to include viewing before/after results when making the decision to proceed with having this type of work performed. It's obvious that just because someone has the equipment and can clean parts does not imply that they can handle large panel items without issue and should be part of the discussion before turning something over to be worked on.
  14. I've read here several times on different threads/posts that warping will occur, no matter the media. I had my '69 Sportman completely blasted, top/bottom, inside and out, the media they used was plastic pellets, and it had no warping at all and we're talking large flat areas. I had posted a number of pictures (before/after) in my thread under the Our Cars & Restoration Projects section if anyone might be interested in seeing the results. Bottom line is that I'm confused by the statement, I guess it could be the person performing the task and the media used. Scott...
  15. This is late Sunday evening, April 6th, 2014. The snow is for the most part just about gone here and the temps are just starting to get into the mid to upper 50's, at least for now, so I'm getting antsy and want to get back at this project. It makes it harder looking at the projects that are starting to come to life here too. I've still got the yard to prep for the spring and other odd jobs to take care of before starting back on the van but with the weather starting to look like it actually might be warming up I should be able to get going on those shortly. Last year I didn't get started until mid May and I'm hoping to get started sooner this year, we'll just have to see, anyway I thought I'd be optomistic and raise this back up toward the top so I don't have to search for it. Sorry this isn't a proper update with photos and all but with some luck it won't be long. Scott...
  16. I see that you found your way to the Our Cars and Restoration Project section. I think that you'll find a good number of people that visit here will find interest in your project. Besides there's a lot of knowledge that passes thru here as well. I saw your comment on the other thread about maybe you should be doing a better job on your project. The fact that your tackling your project is a pretty good start and we all know that time and experience goes a long way and of course a bit money now and then doesn't hurt either. Do what you can when you can and tackle those things that you feel comfortable in doing. Asking questions is also not a bad thing. With all that said I'll close this long winded post, but at least I'm now subscribed for updates. Good luck with your project. Scott...
  17. Personally I think this would be a good thread for the Our Cars & Restoration Projects section.
  18. Flop, who ever the customer is on this project is going to be an amazed and I imagine a pretty happy camper when he picks it up. Looks great. Scott...
  19. Flop, your work does stand apart from most that I've seen and do admire the skills that you've acquired and demonstrated here. It's always a bonus when you have the project and time to post some more examples of your work. Besides, posting your projects are a great bit of free advertisement. Scott...
  20. Flop, you've really developed into one excellent old school metal craftsman, you might actually build a decent paying career with your talents. Scott...
  21. Well it's obvious that your lack of experience has been rectified and I'm sure that it is turned out to be a lot of fun. I'm thinking that you've done a great job there on the body work and the frame sure is not bad either. Scott...
  22. Martin, Great project, I've been following along since your first post and really like the work that you've done. Using what's been done so far as the example of what is still to be done you're going to have a great looking car there. I do though have a question, with the amount of detail work that you've done so far has the rod for the gas pedal not bee cleaned up yet? It does look out of place against the clean floor and I'm thinking it will still be visible after the carpet and pedal are put in. Just asking. Scott...
  23. Pat, Looks to me like it turned out great. Is the pattern that you went with just the straight grain that they offer? I spent some time watching the videos on their site and pretty much fully understand the process of getting the grain to transfer now and the use of different size rollers. I also looked thru their photos and saw a Chrysler Airflow dash that was done in the car as it would have been welded in like my Dodge. There weren't but a couple pictures of the Airflow but I got the feeling that it was done by a pro. As far as doing it myself I thinking I could do all the window trim without any problems, it's the dash that will take some effort. I'm happy that you took the time to post/document your efforts and experience while doing this. Scott...
  24. Roger, I hate to admit it but was trying to be tackful in my comment as I too didn't quite fully follow along to a complete understanding. Pat, I'd already had gone out to the site and poked around a bit again this morning. And don't get me wrong, I was not expecting you to be the professional teacher and attempting to answer all wood graining questions after tackling the task yourself for the first time (to some pretty great success in my opinion). My biggest challenge is that my dash is welded in place hence it can not be removed for this process which introduces more challenges. Scott...
  25. Pat, Thanks for the additional explanation, I'm thinking I followed along. I guess that to really understand it's something that one would just have to try it firsthand and learn thru practice. What I probably really need to do is check out the wood graining site some more and decide what my own approach will be. Scott...
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