strictlyballroom

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About strictlyballroom

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  • Birthday 12/12/1963

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  1. I can now advise what the cause of the problem. In brief, the cylinder head gasket was leaking and coolant was getting into cylinder one preventing the plug from firing. The engine had been rebuilt, but from what I can tell, the head had not been torqued properly. Thanks to all those for your helpful suggestions. Mike
  2. I really appreciate your comprehensive reply, and I will certainly let everyone know the outcome. Mike
  3. Yep, I think you’re absolutely right. Once I’ve taken the head off I’ll post with my findings. Thanks for your help. Mike
  4. The engine is original to the car, and it has been recently overhauled prior to my purchase. I too thought it was probably a valve, but the good compression threw me. Mike
  5. The dizzy does turn ACW so the firing order was a red-herring. The engine is original, but recently rebuilt. The plug and lead is good - all checked three times. The mystery continues.
  6. The same web site that gave me the firing order also stated the direction of the dizzy was CW, but I should have checked, which I will do tomorrow. I really don’t think the leads are a problem given I am getting a really strong spark. i don’t remember a vacuum port, but I will look tomorrow also. it would appear based on the replies so far there is nothing obvious for the cylinder not to be firing. mike
  7. My new 1950 Nash Rambler is only firing on 5 cylinders. Confirmed by when you remove the lead to cylinder 1 it makes no difference. By contrast, remove any of the others and there is a noticeable difference. There is a good spark at cylinder one - tested with inline tester and the more traditional way of holding plug to earth (really strong Blue spark). Looking into the spark plug hole, the valves seem to be opening when the engine is running. The real mystery, the internet tells me the firing order should be 153624. However, it's set-up as 142635. I did try and put the leads as they should be, but the car would not even start. The fact is the car runs quite sweetly with the incorrect firing order, save for missing on one cylinder. The engine is the correct 1950 Nash Rambler straight 6. I performed a Compression test (I only tested 3 cylinders) 1. 105 (the offending cylinder) 2. 90 6. 90 More mystery, the offending cylinder has good compression. I have tried to test the timing, but I could not get my hands on a timing gun that would work with 6 volts, but seeing as she runs pretty well apart from a slight misfire I don't think the timing has anything to do with it. When you remove the plug after running the car for a short-while, the plug is wet so there is fuel getting to the cylinder and you can see it down the plug hole. Yes, I know I should take the head off and see what's happening, but I have just bought this car and I am not near my workshop and hoping I have missed something really obvious. All suggestions welcome. Mike
  8. My new 1950 Nash Rambler is only firing on 5 cylinders. Confirmed by when you remove the lead to cylinder 1 it makes no difference. By contrast, remove any of the others and there is a noticeable difference. There is a good spark at cylinder one - tested with inline tester and the more traditional way of holding plug to earth (really strong Blue spark). Looking into the spark plug hole, the valves seem to be opening when the engine is running. The real mystery, the internet tells me the firing order should be 153624. However, it's set-up as 142635. I did try and put the leads as they should be, but the car would not even start. The fact is the car runs quite sweetly with the incorrect firing order, save for missing on one cylinder. The engine is the correct 1950 Nash Rambler straight 6. I performed a Compression test (I only tested 3 cylinders) 1. 105 (the offending cylinder) 2. 90 6. 90 More mystery, the offending cylinder has good compression. I have tried to test the timing, but I could not get my hands on a timing gun that would work with 6 volts, but seeing as she runs pretty well apart from a slight misfire I don't think the timing has anything to do with it. When you remove the plug after running the car for a short-while, the plug is wet so there is fuel getting to the cylinder and you can see it down the plug hole. Yes, I know I should take the head off and see what's happening, but I have just bought this car and I am not near my workshop and hoping I have missed something really obvious. All suggestions welcome. Mike
  9. Hi I have just bought this 1950 Rambler, and I need to touch-up some of the paint - does anyone what this color is (if indeed it's an original color). Ideally a paint code, but I can work off a name. Thanks Mike.
  10. Many thanks for your replies and despite being told by the seller that it's an overdrive thank heavens I never pulled the cable out when driving, because as I have rightly been told this is not an overdrive, but moreover an emergency option when needing to tow or push start the car. I really appreciate your replies and special thanks to Spinneyhill for copies of the manual.
  11. Hi I have recently bought a 42 Chrysler Windsor Coupe with fluid drive. Nobody seems to be able to tell me what the large chrome knob that sits beside the steering column. It's connected to a cable that runs to the transmission. However, I have been told that Fluid drives do not have overdrive, but I can't think what else it could be - I don't fancy engaging it when doing 50mph down the freeway. Any insight would be helpful. Mike
  12. Hi David - I thought it might help if I included a photo of my shoes. I attached white markers so you can see where the linings start and stop. Mike