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  1. After hearing of the passing of our mutual friend Carl Fielding, C_Carl, or Cadillac Carl, and all the kind things members have to say about him, I thought it would be especially important to have a thread where we can share our positive experiences with other members of this community so they can know our appreciation. This place is chock full of awesome people who go above and beyond to help their fellow enthusiasts. I'll start: EdinMass, for obvious reasons. Thanks for keeping my projects moving forward when I was ready to throw in the towel. alsancle, for picking me up and brushing me off more than a few times when old cars kicked my butt, and convincing me to get back in there and keep fighting. Grimy, for offering technical tidbits that are especially useful and timely, and for introducing me to the awesomeness that is the Pierce-Arrow Society. I'll have one yet! AB-Buff, for sharing a rather remarkable amount of knowledge about these Lincolns we own, up to and including rebuilding my distributor and filling it full of new parts, gratis. You define what makes this hobby awesome. WaltG, for being the conscience and artistic patron saint of this entire community. MCHinson for being a consistent, patient, and calm voice of reason during the frequent storms that are my personality. NeilMorse, you're a friend I've never met with a willingness to tackle projects that intimidate me, thereby shining a light for others to follow. Thank you. GregLaR, for that time you pissed me off royally by calling me out for being less than diplomatic. You forced me to be introspective and examine my beliefs and values, and thereby made me a better person. Gratitude. Bloo, JVPuleo, maok, you guys always show up in the knick of time with just the right technical information to solve my problems. That fills me with more optimism than almost anything else. Thanks to everyone who participates for making this place awesome.
    46 points
  2. So today a newer (as in 2 years) neighbor stopped us today, seems her 14 year old has been scoping out the Model A but was a bit shy... Well, after an invitation, we spent a nice 45 minutes in the freezing shed going over the A. My new pal knows a bit about the era as well, and cited a recent Duesenberg siting in Western MA, how many 14 year olds today even know what an ACD car is... Well, he left with a stack of Hemmings, and in a few weeks I will see if he is interested in taking a ride, maybe helping with some basic maintenance... And so it starts! 👍😊
    36 points
  3. The first iteration of this forum was started in June 1997. There are now 100++ forums, 30+ participating clubs, and 95,000 registered users from all over the world. In our most recent full month, we saw over 15,000 new topic/posts, 500,000 visits, and over 3,000,000 page views. The AACA forums is now arguably the largest forum of its kind, focused exclusively on antique automobiles of all makes and models. I want to thank the AACA Board of Directors and specifically Steve Moskowitz. A few other standouts who have managed and mentored me (ie drove me crazy sometime) including Howard Scottland, Terry Bond, Earl D. Beauchamp, Jr., Janet Ricketts, and in particular - Ron Barnett. They followed (and funded) my vision since day 1 to keep this a free open forum for antique automobile enthusiasts. A few participate in this forum even today. Others have passed, and as I write this, I'm reminded of how much they are missed. I want to thank the Moderators. Without them this forum would have gone the way of many other car forums due to off topic posts and personality clashes. Their time and efforts go unrecognized and unappreciated but make this forum what it is. I especially want to thank the forum users. 99.99% of you follow the forum rules and freely contribute your time, knowledge, and talents to enlighten and educate people about automobile history, and to help keep our antique automobiles on the road and properly restored. I never visioned 24 years ago I'd still be managing this forum. Few in my personal life know (or care) about this forum, but for me it's become my unique mission to help keep our antique automobiles and this hobby alive. Thank you for participating. Peter Gariepy
    34 points
  4. Just wishing everyone a very Merry Christmas. While most of us are having a holiday that is substantially reduced in family members, we still have much to be thankful for. Enjoy time with family and stay safe. I would also like to thank everyone who interacted with me on the 1917 White........I have a bunch of new friends associated with the purchase and service of the car. We join the hobby for the cars......but we stay because of our friends.
    33 points
  5. Houston, we found the problem... No need for any more testing after this. There's obviously not a drop of water being moved by the water pump. The pump and engine are full enough that the pump should be pushing a whole lot of water through it and through the outlet tubes. Temperature skyrocketed again, as it always does because, obviously, the water in the engine isn't going anywhere and just sits there boiling. I'm draining the bucket now--it served its purpose so there's no need for it to sit there leaking all over the shop overnight. Engine was running somewhat poorly because I had to prop the choke open with the little yellow cap so I could walk around and shoot the video. With finer choke adjustment, it runs quite well. Sounds gnarly, but runs well. Oil pressure is all over the place but I figure that's due to poor idle quality. It goes up when it's supposed to, which makes me happy. Water pump comes off tomorrow and I'll get it back to Jim for analysis and repair. Good that I found the problem and it's very solvable.
    30 points
  6. Behold the power of this forum! I was showing some visitors out and turned around to find Jason AKA @K8096 in my shop bearing gifts because he'd been reading about my water pump woes. First, sorry I didn't recognize you right away, Jason, and second, check out the awesome: Jason had a spare water pump that he's allowing me to dissect and measure. It's not viable (check out the big crack down the side of the oil cooler housing) but he's certain that it has never been apart. I can pull the rear cover and take some measurements of the impeller's location on the shaft and in relation to the housing. I've got it soaking in penetrating oil now so hopefully it comes apart without much of a fight tomorrow. I'll go get my pump from Jim's place and do some dissecting. Thanks, Jason!
    29 points
  7. Today is Pearl Harbor Day. Remember what that means. Never Forget.
    29 points
  8. I finally made a trip down a portion Route 66 in my ’64 Skylark. Making a cross-country road trip has been a dream of mine since I was a kid, having inherited the wanderlust from my father who had the same dream but sadly never got the chance to fulfill it. While I was growing up all our vacation travel was done by car. Flying anywhere for vacation wasn’t a thing with my generation or within my family’s income bracket. One of the more memorable trips was the one we took from Paterson, NJ to Miami Beach in 1965, much of it via US 1 before I-95 was completed. Pre-interstate highway travel was at once tedious and full of things to see. While Route 66 has become famous for its roadside attractions and an icon of pre-interstate highway travel with its quirks and small towns, it was not at all unique in that regard. I vividly remember many of the sights along US 1 including kitschy roadside attractions and Burma Shave signs, many of which were still standing in 1965. I decided long ago that if I ever got the chance to travel Route 66 it would be in a car that could have traveled the famous road back in its heyday, or at least before the road was decommissioned as a US highway. My Skylark would do nicely, being old enough to satisfy me and yet new enough to travel easily on modern highways when necessary. I bought the Skylark nearly seven years ago and had been working on it up until last year. It needed only minor repairs and upgrades to make me feel comfortable taking it on a long journey. I replaced the water pump and thermostat, all belts and hoses, motor mounts, had the carburetor rebuilt by a respected specialist, rebuilt the power steering pump, installed new seat and shoulder belts, new alternator and regulator, completely rebuilt the brake system with new steel lines and hoses, master cylinder and brake booster with conversion to a dual-circuit system, wheel cylinders, and brake shoes and drums. About two weeks before I left home, I had a new set of tires installed. Anything that wasn’t broken that I could readily replace on the road was stashed in the trunk like a spare fuel pump, tune-up parts, spark plugs and ignition coil. I was ready as I would ever be. Prior to embarking on the trip, I researched Route 66 to death to identify the alignments I wanted to take and the sights I wanted to see. I bought a copy of Jerry McClanahan’s Route 66: EZ66 GUIDE For Travelers, which is an excellent resource that provides a wealth of information with turn-by-turn directions. Because I would be traveling alone without the help of a navigator to read the directions to me, I needed something that would allow me to keep my eyes and the Skylark on the road. I found the Route 66 Navigation app that works on smart phones, and it worked very well for me. It uses GPS navigation to guide you along the route by giving verbal instructions just like any GPS navigation system. It worked like a charm. I had limited time for my trip, so I planned only to go as far as Tulsa before turning around and heading back up to Auburn for the Buick gathering at the beginning of July. I didn’t feel the need to do every inch of ‘66 so I skipped the eastern terminus in downtown Chicago and started in Joliet. Days One and Two I left home on the morning of June 22nd and traveled I-80 to Austintown, OH where I spent the first night. On Day Two I headed for Joliet, IL where I would spend the second night before getting on ’66 the morning of Day Three. On the way to Joliet, I passed by South Bend where I made a side trip to visit the Studebaker National Museum. Having owned two Studebakers in the past I didn’t want to miss the opportunity to visit the marque’s hometown and tour the museum. It was smaller than I expected but well worth the trip. Day Three: Getting on Route 66 from Joliet to Springfield, IL The first Route 66 landmark I encountered was the Gemini Giant in Wilmington, IL. I stopped to photograph it only because it’s there. The luncheonette where it’s located was closed, otherwise I’d have dropped a little coin there. You’ll note that most of the photos include my car. My wife isn’t retired yet so I was traveling alone, and the car had to substitute for a traveling companion in the photos. My next stop was Ambler’s Service Station in Dwight, which is a preserved vintage gas station that serves as a museum. The attendant was very friendly and informative, and I had a most pleasant time there. My next stop was Pontiac, IL where I hit two museums, the Pontiac-Oakland Auto Museum and the Route 66 Hall of Fame and Museum. Both were fun to walk through, although the auto museum was of more interest to me than the bric-a-brac at the other one. While at the Route 66 Hall of Fame and Museum I had the pleasure of meeting a couple and their young daughter from Hawthorne, NJ, a neighboring town to Paterson where I grew up. They overheard me answer the museum attendant’s question about where I was from, and a nice conversation about NJ ensued (if you can believe there are nice conversations about NJ). The last stop of note for the day was in Atlanta, IL where I visited the Atlanta Museum. I arrived near closing time but one of the attendants offered to stay on and give me a tour. It’s not a Route 66 oriented museum, but instead focuses on local town history. I didn’t think I’d be interested, but as it turns out it was very interesting to learn about the town and share in the enthusiasm the attendant had for her home. I traveled on to Springfield, where I spent the night. Day Four: Springfield, IL to Fairview Heights, IL I spent a fair amount of time in Springfield visiting the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum, his home, and his tomb. All were well worth seeing for those interested in this president. I had lunch at the Cozy Dog Drive-In so I could try a much-celebrated corn dog. It was my first corn dog, and unlike other notable firsts in my life I will not remember this one fondly. I can’t really say if the corn batter tasted good or bad, for it needed to have a taste at all for me to have made that judgment. The best thing I can say is that it stayed down. My next stop of note was Country Classic Cars in Staunton, IL. The welcome I received was colder than a mother-in-law’s kiss, and the asking prices vs the conditions of the vehicles left me with an impression that I’m at a loss to describe in polite terms. It’s well worth visiting, but only if you don't stop. Henry’s Rabbit ranch was a short way down the road, also located in Staunton. The place was an absolute hoot, and Henry was a very pleasant and engaging character whose company I thoroughly enjoyed. I spent about a half hour there talking just about everything except for religion and politics. Another worthwhile stop, but for the conversation more so than the detritus outside. I stopped at the old Chain of Rocks Bridge in Madison, IL on my way to Fairview Heights where I spent the night. There are several old bridges along Route 66, this being a fine example of one that’s now closed to vehicular traffic. Day Five – Fairview Heights, IL to Lebanon, MO First thing in the morning I crossed the Mississippi into St. Louis and headed to the National Museum of Transportation where I met Jim, who goes by the name Ohjai on the forums here with his beautiful ’62 Skylark convertible. The museum was a worthwhile stop with several rare and unusual cars on display. They also have a selection of rail cars on display. Afterward Jim and I had lunch at Uncle Bill’s in Manchester before I continued down the road. A very nice visit with a pleasant fellow. I happened upon the Jesse James Wax Museum in Stanton, MO and did a self-tour. There were lots of interesting artifacts on display, and there was a video that provided interesting facts about the famous outlaw. Another worthwhile stop for those interested in such things. My next stop was the Wagon Wheel Motel in Cuba, another historic Route 66 landmark. I wanted to overnight there, but it didn’t fit into my schedule because I arrived much too early in the day to stop for the night. There was a local cruise-in going on at the motel, so I found an empty parking space and crashed the event. I continued to the Munger Moss Motel in Lebanon where I spent the night. I spent some time chatting with the elderly owner who had some interesting stories about surviving as a small motel operator during the height of the COVID 19 pandemic. She essentially runs the place by herself with some help from her daughter. The room cost me less than $60 for the night including tax, and it was worth every penny if you get my drift. Even though the motel isn’t likely to be featured among the world’s best in Conde Nast Traveler I’d stay there again, and I would encourage others to do so as well if only to help the place survive. Day Six – Lebanon, MO to Carthage, MO Springfield, MO is home to the Route 66 Car Museum. They had a fairly large selection of cars, both common and unusual. I was surprised to find a Horch on display since they seem to be quite rare, at least here in the US. I had only seen one other that was reported to have belonged to General Rommel, The Desert Fox of WW2 fame. A bit of useless trivia: Horch was part of the Auto Union and is represented by one of the four rings in the Audi logo. The Gay Parita Service Station in Everton was my next stop along Route 66. I spent about an hour and a half on the porch having a cigar and talking with owner George and various other Route 66 travelers. The ghost town of Spencer was a short drive down the road from Everton where I came upon a small gathering of local Corvair owners. We had some fun admiring each other’s cars and swapping stories. My last stop of the day was in Carthage, where I spent the night at the Boots Court Motel. Honestly, from the look of the place as I drove up, I’d have happily gone right past it had I not already made a reservation. Fortunately, the look of the exterior gave no hint as to the wonderful restoration of the rooms. There are two sections to the motel, and the only one that has been restored to date is the rear section. My room was immaculate and was beautifully restored to its mid-1940s décor, complete with refinished wood floors and original furniture. I highly recommend the place. Day Seven – Carthage, MO to Catoosa, OK My first photo op of the day was at the Rainbow Curve Bridge in Baxter Springs, KS. This is one of several historic bridges along Route 66 that remains open to traffic. Further down the road in Baxter Springs is the Kansas Route 66 Information Center in an historic Phillips 66 service station. That’s where I had the pleasure to meet Dean “Crazy Legs” Walker who was the inspiration for the Tow Mater character in the movie Cars. He has the rare (at least I think it’s rare) ability to turn his feet around to face backward. He gave me an unsolicited demonstration that was more uncomfortable for me to watch than it was for him to do. He was the attendant at the information center and was quite helpful and fun to be around. There isn’t much of Kansas along Route 66 and I soon found myself in Oklahoma. Some of the travel guides mention the ghost town of Picher that was vacated in the 1970s due to chemical contamination. I made the side trip to Picher and regretted it. There’s nothing to see there but a group of gutted buildings in the middle of nowhere. There are a couple of still-occupied non-residential buildings, but the place held no interest for me and had a very sketchy vibe. Don’t waste your time going there like I did. Miami, OK has the reported last remaining original 9’ section of original pavement on Route 66. It was built in 1922 and decommissioned 1937. I drove on it for about one mile before the road deteriorated to the point where I’d had my share of fun on it. I couldn’t help but stop at the Blue Whale of Catoosa. The story goes that a local gentleman who apparently had a lot of time on his hands built it as a gift to his wife on their wedding anniversary. I hope he got a better thank you from his wife than I would have received from mine had I gifted something like that to her for our anniversary. Day Eight – Catoosa to Tulsa, Final Day on Route 66 I managed to hit five museums that day. The J.M. Davis Museum in Claremore has a bewildering collection of firearms. A must-see for firearms enthusiasts. The Will Rogers Memorial Museum in Claremore is another must-see for anyone interested in the life, wit, and wisdom of this political commentator and satirist. He was a class act in every sense of the word, and we could surely use someone like him today. The Catoosa Historical Museum is a small museum that focuses on local history. The attendant was pleasant and talkative, and it’s worth a stop to learn a little bit about one of the towns that Route 66 runs through. The D.W. Correll museum was my next stop. It houses an extensive collection of minerals and a relatively small collection of cars. My last museum stop was the Tulsa Air and Space Museum and Planetarium. It wasn’t very large, but it had some interesting examples of aircraft. It was another stop worth making. The final landmark I visited on Route 66 before heading to the hotel was the Meadow Gold sign in downtown Tulsa. This marked the end of my Route 66 trek. The following day I hopped on the Interstate highway System and made my way up to Auburn, IN where I attended the Buick gathering on July 2nd and 3rd. I arrived back home on July 4th after 3,300 miles. The trip was a complete success, and I hope to take the Buick on the road again next year to complete the stretch of Route 66 between Tulsa and Santa Monica. My wife will be retired by then, so I hope to have some company next time.
    28 points
  9. Effective Immediately: Non-hobby related political posts, responses, private messages, comments, or emails and social media originating from the forum* will be deleted without comment. Those that make them will be banned for 90 days. Second offenses will get them banned for life. * Moderators and other forum users have reported harassment from other forum participants in personal emails and on their social media accts. Forum Rules
    28 points
  10. Thanks for the kind words and support, everyone. It is always appreciated. Rumors of my demise (or the engine's) are greatly exaggerated and today we fired it up again after doing some testing and making some changes. First, there's a new oil pump. There was nothing obviously wrong with the old one, but it's one variable to check off the list. Although I really didn't want to do it, I broke down and pulled a main bearing cap and used some Plasti-Gauge to check clearances. The book says .002-.003 and my mains measured .002" with no signs of oil starvation, so that was a relief. Obviously oil was circulating and there was no damage due to the low pressure. Main bearings were in good shape with no signs of oil starvation. Clearances measured out at .002". The main bearings on this engine are insanely complicated, using insert bearings (good) and a locating ring that was a real pain to deal with. The mains are fed by individual pipes from the main oil manifold and getting that lined up with the hole in the bearing was a bit of a challenge, as well as the locating rings that hold everything in alignment. I guess I'm glad I took it apart to look, but it was even more of a PITA than I imagined it would be. Just measuring one main bearing was about five hours of work given my trial-and-error assembly/disassembly process. That done, I bolted the oil pickup tube and pan back in place with new gaskets, then had the guy next door use his forklift to pull the engine off the lift and put it back on the ground. I pulled the oil cooler tube with my adapters bolted to it and reconfigured everything to just feed the new oil pressure gauge--I didn't bother with the pressure pot this time since I figured everything was well-oiled from all the other times I used it. Looking at the manual and the diagrams others have posted in this thread, I realized that the thing I thought was the regulator is actually the bypass for the oil cooler and the thing I thought was the bypass is actually the regulator. This is good, because the regulator is the one that is accessible from the outside of the engine and the bypass was the thing I couldn't get a wrench on. If pressure gets too high, oil pushes the little piston out of the way and dumps oil back into the pan through the block. Since I removed the regulator piston and spring to connect my gauge, I effectively eliminated any pressure regulation--it should have whatever the max output of the pump actually is. I have not decided whether I will reinstall the spring and plunger or if I'll just leave my bypass in place--more oil pressure is better than less, up to a certain point anyway, and I'm not sure this pump is capable of making more than about 60 PSI anyway. So all that done, I filled the crankcase and the radiator, connected the battery and [very reluctantly] pressed the button. It bellowed to life and sure enough, there's plenty of oil pressure. The book says it should be 45 PSI at start up, and that's what it was showing, going up to 50-55 PSI at about 1500 RPM and down to 5-10 at idle (which the book also says is OK). It's worth noting that the cheap oil pressure gauge on which I was previously relying read about 5 PSI less than the main gauge, suggesting that the gauge wasn't the problem. It was definitely the oil pump, and I'm relieved that it appears to be healthy now. However, it still has a major heat issue. We ran it for five or six minutes and it eventually overheated and boiled over at 220 degrees again, with MASSIVE heat coming off the manifolds. Something is still amiss with the cooling system and/or timing/ignition systems to make it cook itself, but oil pressure is no longer an issue. What a relief. Next step will be to install the engine-driven fan, as suggested by Matt Hinson, and see if it moves enough air to keep things cool. I'm not convinced that the electric fan I'm using is really moving enough air, despite being able to feel a pretty good breeze through the core. I may try the bucket experiment, replacing the radiator with a 50-gallon barrel full of water, and seeing what the water pump's flow looks like in real time. I'm also going to remove the oil cooler in the water pump and reinstall the bypass pipe, since that obviously wasn't the issue. I'm curious to see how it affects oil pressure, if at all. It took everything I had to screw myself together enough to push the button and fire it again. I really wasn't equipped for another failure, despite steeling myself for it for more than a week. Expecting failure is my default state, although I somehow also remain eternally optimistic that things will turn out OK. I'm hugely relieved that things did, indeed, turn out OK this time--even Melanie breathed a big sigh of relief (I'm sure I've been pretty miserable to be around for the past 10 days or so). The cooling issues are probably solvable and the rest is tuning and sorting. Still a long way to go, but one major hurdle has been cleared and I don't believe the engine is hurt. Thanks for all the support, guys, it really means a lot.
    26 points
  11. After being married for 40 years, I took a careful look at my life. I told my wife that forty years ago we lived in a cheap apartment, drove a junk car, slept on a sofa bed, and watched a 16-inch black and white TV. But hey, every night I got to sleep with the hottest 23 year-old girl I knew. Now we live in a $750,000 house, have a collection of antique and classic cars, sleep on a huge bed, and watch a 60-inch wide-screen flat screen TV. But every night I crawl into bed with a 65 year-old woman. I told her that it seems like she's not holding up her end of things. My wife's a very reasonable woman. She replied that I should go out and find a hot 23 year-old girl to sleep with, and once again I will be living in a cheap apartment, driving a junk car, sleeping on a sofa bed, and watching no TV at all. Aren't older women great? They really know how to solve problems! But then she contracted cancer, and the Lord took her away. Suddenly I realized I'd give up the $750,000 house, collection of antique and classic cars, huge bed, and wide screen TV just to have that 65 year-old woman back. Now I realize what had been best for me all along.
    26 points
  12. Obviously time to put the top up!
    26 points
  13. Just picked up this 1930 Pierce Model B Touring about a week ago. I am new to PA’s (and a car as old as this) but I have been contacted by several PAS members (which I have already joined) who are ready,willing and able to offer me any assistance/advice that I may need. I wish to thank you all in advance (Ed M.) When it hit the internet about a week or so ago it certainly stirred up a lot of interest. I look forward to owning this car
    25 points
  14. What an expensive way to ruin the look of your car.
    25 points
  15. she can outrun ol Papa 🎶The wheels on the bus go round and round🎶 “This, this is the one I want”
    25 points
  16. Recently, an entire thread on the American Underslung was deleted. It was an accident and I just learned it was my fault. No one else's. I banned a member for just cause but was not aware that by doing so it would take down the entire thread. I simply did not realize he started the thread. I am horrified that not only I did this that others were blamed for my mistake. I have discussed this with Peter and will make sure that nothing like this happens again. We got a very lengthy apology from the person I banned. it was heartfelt and based upon the stress in his life at the time it is more understandable. Still no excuse but a reason. We will be reinstating him. To all those who were affected by my actions I can only apologize. I certainly had no intention whatsoever of deleting a great thread.
    24 points
  17. My Curved Dash Olds, on a day I did NOT go touring; my 1912 Buick on a tour in Delaware a few years ago; my 1911 Stanley, steaming up at daybreak on last year's HCCA one-and two-cylinder tour.
    24 points
  18. 23 points
  19. After searching for 5 years and many post in the Want Section here on the forum, the missing passenger side door molding for my '69 Impala SS project has been located ! A friend of mine in South Jersey was able to locate the NOS molding from a acquisition this week of vintage parts ~ Thanks Donny ! Steve
    23 points
  20. My Brother decided to sell his Model A Roadster. A potential buyer showed interest but wanted his "mechanic" to check out the car, which he did. His only negative was that the A was difficult to shift, "probably because the synchronizers were badly worn".
    22 points
  21. I won't be restoring this one....Just maintaining and enjoying it. I brought it home this week. It was restored 25 years ago. It came with an appraisal from 1998, 50,000 miles. When I got it this week, 57,000 miles. She's a gem. An emerald one. 1938 Chrysler C16 Royal coupe.
    22 points
  22. Perfect timing ... we had already planned to do these photos when the family was over yesterday. Our 1927 Auburn 6-66 "Wanderer" Sedan: Top Photo: 1962 I am the middle son (left of picture), age 6 Bottom Photo: 2021 I am the grandfather seated on the running board. Same car, same coats, even found the same sign & newspaper clipping that were taped to the windows. (Dad didn't throw out much.)
    22 points
  23. FINAL REGULAR POST UPDATE: Everything in life must come to an end, and it’s time to put this thread to its logical conclusion. While the car still needs a bit of sorting and finishing...........today I will align the front end.......it’s time to end the regular updates. I will install a new set of tires in a few weeks, and do countless other small items. I spent the last four days driving the White as my “everyday car”. It’s been staying outside overnight in my driveway at my house.....the rain and heat finally stopped in Southern Florida. I used the car for going to work, out to eat, the grocery store as well as the hardware store. Took the wife and dogs for a three hour ride in it along the water on Thanksgiving day. Since the first time I started it, it has never failed to proceed or break down. Every single time I set out in it from day one, it’s made it back to the garage without complaint. Rather amazing if you ask me. It’s entirely reliable, starts instantly hot or cold...........the strangest sensation even for me.........a car this early and new to the road is simply a 100 percent reliable car. The car has been a pure joy to learn about, recommission, and drive. I don’t think I have ever worked on a project that was as much fun as this one. I have made fifty new friends during this adventure.........which is even better than owning the car. I will come back and post occasional updates........but the best update will be looking for the car in the publications as I intend to drive it that much in the next few years. The car will now make its way north as soon as it’s finished. The White was one of the few bright spots in my life during the pandemic..........so much sadness and heartbreak on a daily basis.....it was fantastic therapy for me........and from the comments I have received, for many others as well. I would like to thank everyone who has helped, commented, shared information, and contacted me during this “Great White Adventure” the car has become something much different than I anticipated..........and every single part of the journey has been fun. My best to all...........and I hope to see you at a show or on a tour.....with a bit of luck, I will be driving the White or displaying it at the event. We still have another six months of challenging times ahead of us before we get back to “normal”...........if anyone dares to think any of us ever fit the definition of the word!
    22 points
  24. 22 points
  25. I had to swing by one of the shops in my local industrial complex today and found this 100 year old girl sitting in the parking lot.
    21 points
  26. A very long day. Reassembled the everything, including the front cover three times--first I forgot the safety wire on the camshaft bolts and then, after putting it together AGAIN, I realized I forgot the cotter pin on the tensioner pulley. Good thing I bought a new gasket because after several on/off/on/off cycles the original was toast. Whatever, I should have been paying attention a little better. Then I installed the generator and fought for a few hours with the water pump drive and oil cooler lines, but eventually prevailed. Then I rebuilt my engine stand and reinstalled the radiator, which was also easier said than done--getting everything lined up where it was before was challenging. I filled it with roughly 7 gallons, bled the water pump using my schrader valve (worked perfectly!), and hooked up the battery. Turned the key and hit the starter button and... nothing. Nada. Dead. Is the battery good? Check. Connections? Good. Oh, crap, the starter button has probably failed. Meh, there's one on the starter solenoid so I used that. Not as easy to manipulate the choke and throttle while reaching down to the starter to crank it, but after some cranking to fill the carburetor, it FIRED and it was a completely different engine. Check it out: As you can see, it idles cleanly at about 600 RPM. The sound is completely different. Plenty of oil pressure. And, perhaps most importantly, temperatures are reasonable and mostly under control. After about 10 minutes it eventually worked its way up to 200 degrees and I shut it off, but it cooled off quickly and fired instantly without any throttle or choke when I hit the button a second time. It is a completely different animal. Some tuning is in order to help it stay cool and to dial out the off-idle stumble, but it is 80% better than it was. Now I can run it long enough to do the tuning without worrying about it going super nova. It still gets hot and it doesn't recover, but there still things to be done, including reinstalling the restrictors. And you will note that it appears to be flowing plenty of water (staying cool) at idle. The water pump is healthy. But, of course, this is my car and it's THIS car, so it wasn't all smiles. There was a peculiar rattle/grumble/growl from the back of the engine, almost like the teeth on the flywheel are just barely touching something. Of course, this is also where the oil pump lives and I couldn't stop thinking about that oil pump mounting bolt that wouldn't tighten and I replaced it with a stud--was it too long? Did it come loose? Were the threads stripped and it worked its way out? Or was it the starter? I pulled the cover off the flywheel and looked around and didn't see anything amiss, although it appears that the starter drive stays permanently meshed with the flywheel gears, even when it's running--is this right? Starter drive is always meshed with the flywheel. Can this be right? Could it be the source of the noise? I started it back up and the sound was still there until there was a sudden and somewhat loud ping and then the noise stopped. So something broke off and stopped rubbing? You can hear it happen in the first few seconds of this video: Was this sound new or was it simply audible now that the engine was running better? And should I be worried about the sound even though it seems to be gone now? I don't know. I can't celebrate without knowing. You'll also note all that oil on the flywheel and in the bellhousing. It appears to be coming out of the center of the pilot bearing, which has a felt seal--am I wrong to assume it will stop once there's a transmission shaft in there? Anyway, two steps forward, maybe one step back. Tomorrow I'll do a compression test to make sure it's all good inside and investigate the sound and see if it's truly gone. If I feel up to it, maybe even do some tuning.
    21 points
  27. FROM MARTY: Got home yesterday. Only moderate damage to house. Limited electricity from natural gas generator. Still hoping to make Glidden and Hershey, Expects it to be weeks without electricity, potable water, internet or cable TV. He asks you to keep the Houma/Thibodaux region in your thoughts and prayers. They were in the eye of the storm for hours. God Bless!!!
    21 points
  28. Some beautiful cars.... My 1933 Graham taken in 1935 with my Aunts and Uncles, my Mom was not born yet, the young lady on the left is now 92. My Mom in the Graham when she was about 10, 1953? Must have been a last ride, it was sold around that time. Found and bought the Graham back in 1999, the Out for a drive last fall
    21 points
  29. We finally got it ready to test it for a drive ability.. This old 1920 had been idle since 1933.. We went through a lot of stuff before we could even think about driving it.. Well did it.. two laps around the building..
    21 points
  30. Reminds me of the senior gentleman who was pulling up to parallel park his Bently when, quick as a wink, a 20 year old fellow in a small sports car wheels in behind him and grabs the spot. He jumps out of his car, smirking and as he passes the old boy he says "See old timer, if you were young and quick like me, you could've done that." Without flinching, the old boy puts the Bently in reverse and, to the chagrin of the younger man, proceeds to crush the little sports car between his rear bumper and the car behind. He steps from the car and says to the young man "And if you were old and rich like me, you could've done that".
    21 points
  31. Sorry to mislead any Forward Look Mopar fans but this is about my latest new car - a 1960 Buick LeSabre Bubbletop! I actually bought this car in the middle of April but it has taken me until last night to get it shipped to Texas. This is another of my "all-time favorite list" cars and I was powerless to resist its fins, two-tone paint and wide whites. I was very pleased that it looked even better coming off the truck than I expected. Once I have a chance to give it a good checkout and drive I will start threads in My Cars and the Buick Forums.
    21 points
  32. I am speechless - it is an honor to be mentioned. I just do what I do, don't really think about it , just feel it needs to be done/shared as many friends early on 45+ years ago did with me . It is totally useless to have period information and not share it but make sure people know you have it so you can gloat that you are better then everyone else. HUH? History has always been a great passion for me, my whole life , what "happened then" can inspire "now" and the people and places that did that need to be respected and admired. It is my way to say "thank you" to them . So many people that are gone I can't thank in person, many who were there when the history we love was being created by them without them knowing it. So many new friends here and long time ones too. Support your car clubs, they support you, especially AACA for hosting these forums.
    21 points
  33. Sunday, May 2, 2021: "With This Ring........" A Wedding Story Today I had the honor of participating in a beautiful wedding ceremony with my Buick. It turned out to be a beautiful day, and the Buick performed flawlessly. Oh, the newlyweds looked really nice too! I won't take a lot of time, but I do want to share a few photos. It was so nice to get back into a public space, with people, laughing, dancing..... starting to regain a little normalcy to our lives. Here's the backstory: I purchased the Buick from the estate of Mr. Harry Yeager. Harry and I were friends through our local Vintage Automobile Club of Ocean County. Harry's daughter, Jen, is a hygienist in my office and has been working with me for 24 years. 30 years ago, Jen was married in the Buick. Her dad, Harry, drove her to the venue. TODAY, Jen's daughter was married in the Buick. She was so looking forward to being driven in her grandfather's car, and so I was honored to make that happen! Here are a few photos: The Buick just turned 2000 miles on Sunday, April 25, 2021. I followed the "2,000 mile maintenance" schedule and topped off the master cylinder, changed the oil, changed the transmission oil, drained and filled the radiator, filled the tank and generally went through the chassis and gave the bolts little "snug". Here I am on Wednesday, April 28, 2021 beginning what would turn out to be about 30 hours detailing the car to get it all shined up! I cleaned everything out from under the fenders, under the running boards, the engine and flywheel pans. Then started on the white walls, the chrome, .... The windows, all the grille bars, and then that black paint, starting from the roof and working down. When all the detailing was done inside and out, I applied this sticker-decal to the glass. Sunday, May 2, 2021: Wedding Day! The day started with a downpour! By 10:00 it stopped raining and the streets began to dry. I was dreading getting caught in a storm, but the weather angels smiled, and it was good the rest of the day! Here I am at noon, ready to play my role as the chauffeur. I live in Wall Township, NJ. The wedding was held in Hamilton, NJ. I basically mapped out a route using all back roads and county roads that paralleled 195. So, for those of you not from Jersey, I had to traverse the entire state from east to west. Hamilton is about 4 miles from Pennsylvania. It was just about 42 miles each way. This photo is one of the many back roads I travelled. Most of the trip looked like this. Not what you think of when you think of Jersey, but we really do have some beautiful areas. Honestly, I was stressed on the way out. It was so important to the bride to be there, and I was just praying for a safe, trouble free trip. The Buick delivered. Arrived at the Hamilton Manor right on time, and they took hundreds of photos with the car. Here, the Bride is in the front seat, getting ready for the "first look"..... the first time the groom sees her all dolled up. I think that is something kinda new at these weddings now. When I got married, my "first look" was when she was walking up the aisle. She was a stunning bride, and they've dated since High School. All in all, a very fun and exciting day! I was so happy to be able to come through for her. Last one! They finished all their photos and I was back on the road, crossing the state, with a lot less anxiety. I actually enjoyed the ride very much! Then, back to the wedding to attend as a guest! Very busy day, but all-in-all, very satisfying. I hope you all are staying safe and healthy out there! Have a great night. Gary
    21 points
  34. They're waving at the dog.
    21 points
  35. I just purchased this 54 Chevy from my close friends estate. My friend's story mirrors Steve's editorial in the last issue of Antique Automobile. He did not have any relatives, and nothing on paper. Sadly the State of New Jersey got everything, whom I purchased the car from. This car is a looker!
    21 points
  36. I spent the last 6 months going thru this '52 Nash Healey, yesterday I drove it out of the shop and around the block for the first time in over 20 years. This morning I started it up to pull it out of the shop and the cold air etc all felt so good I just drove away, shop doors wide open and furnace running. I putted about town and it would bring people right to a stop. It still isn't fully together and has shop dirt on it, here it is: She is a sweetie to drive, thats a fact!
    21 points
  37. First you need to know the legal disposition of the estate. If there's no will, then probate court will probably decide the widow gets everything. Or maybe one of the kids contests it. That makes things sticky. Until things are finalized legally, there's nothing you can or should do. If the widow tells you to sell the cars but one of the kids decides he or she wants it, that makes all kinds of headaches. Let them finalize the estate and put everything into place legally before you do anything. However, there's something important you can do to help right away. We deal with a lot of widows and next-of-kin and someone needs to get the cars out of sight and tied up so that all the vultures don't start pestering the widow. You know, the guys who knew about the cars and will inevitably show up and start saying, "Well, you know Bob and I were close and he really wanted me to have these cars. He said at one time I could buy them for $XXXX." They're like mosquitos and will hound her relentlessly and make her miserable. If you're The Guy who is helping with the cars, you need to make it well-known that the cars are tied up and not available so don't ask. I can't tell you how many widows show up in our shop and eventually end up in tears talking about how awful her late husband's "friends" treated her trying to get their hands on the cars. If the cars exist, you should at least try to go see them and assess their condition, determine their specifics, and maybe start working up some comparable values so that you can speak with some authority when someone asks you what they're worth. You could also start making sure the titles are in order, or at least that they match the cars and can be reliably transferred. They will probably have to go through the estate, but if they're from 1968 with a dead guy's signature on them, well, you can run into some problems settling the estate and selling the cars. Paperwork can take a long time to sort out; start now so you know what will need to be done. There's a lot to do if you're the go-to guy the family wants to handle the disposition of the cars. Start your homework now, help the widow by putting out the word that the cars are not currently available, and be there for her as a reliable friend, not an opportunist (not that you would do that). Let her work through this at her own pace and be there to support her and offer advice when asked. Don't push her, just let her know that when she's ready, you're her partner to solve this problem. Most likely she will just want them gone ASAP without worrying about squeezing every penny out of them, so you should respect that even if you think you can get more. She probably just wants to put it all away, so respect that. Selling them fast for 85% of their value is better than holding out for years to get 100%. Respect the widow first and foremost. Make her life easier during this difficult time. That really matters.
    21 points
  38. 1954 Cadillac Series 62 - Used by Cadillac Dealer's wife for first 25 years, and in a private Colorado collection for next 30 years, now AACA DPC, shown, and driven on multiple tours, and driven 10,000 miles in a 3-month period from New Orleans to judge at Palm Springs, then on to the Los Angeles Museums and our family, up the Pacific Coast Highway to an AACA Divisional Tour at Yosemite, and on to Portland, Vancouver, back to judge at Auburn, tour at Gettysburg, drive to Minneapolis, and the Grand National at Independence, Missouri. 1941 Cadillac cabriolet, delivered originally to the Biltmore in Asheville, NC as a divorce gift from "Miss" Cornelia Vanderbilt to her husband John. Classic Car Club of America National 1st Place - Touring at Ohio mini-CARavan Driven 2,000 miles to, on, and from Glidden Tour in Twin Falls, Idaho, as well as dozens of other AACA CCCA and VMCCA Tours. 1930 Packard 733 7-Passenger Dual Windshield Touring - AACA Senior & First Preservation - delivered via Paris to Monaco, as suggested to the royal family, eventually acquired by the Abba Kogan collection, and repatriated by the Dragones in 2002 - We have driven and shown at AACA Meets and Tours 1937 Buick Roadmaster Phaeton 80C - Delivered to New York City as Parade Car for Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia, Unrestored - now 13,xxx miles, AACA HPOF & HPOF ORIGINAL, driven on many AACA and Glidden Tours 1915 Hudson SIX-40 7-Passenger Phaeton, AACA Senior, First Preservation during Fred Long ownership, Driven on recent AACA Reliability Tours 1965 Corvair Monza convertible, 4-speed, 23,xxx miles, AACA DPC 1912 Oakland Model 30 Touring - regrettably no longer ours, but was our first Brass-era tourer 1988 Corvette convertible, still One-Family since new, AACA Senior & Repeat Preservation, Unrestored and tour-driven - 145,xxx miles, Bought new by my cousin, and never spent a night out of doors except when on tour, or driven to Jay Leno's garage in Burbank, CA 1963 Impala Convertible on AACA Founders Tour - Valley Forge, PA, passed to new owner- with grandson who is now in Grad School and a Graduate Teaching Assistant 1927 Chevy Capitol AA Roadster - now belongs to local friends - driven on many AACA, VCCA, and VMCCA tours Chicago Bulls mascot with our 1941 Cadillac in New Orleans Chicago Bulls Mascot took this photo at Jackson Square, New Orleans 1914 Buick B-37 Touring - now in collection of another friend in Texas, Shown and driven on many AACA Tours Corvair Monza heading out for a local CORSA meeting, Jambalaya, Burgers, Brats, and Corvair fellowship AACA personalized antique license plate on “former Fred Long” 1915 Hudson
    21 points
  39. I'll play too. Nice thread! First photo was taken in 1966, just as I was starting 7th grade. Notice the sweater which my Mom had skillfully knitted for me, featuring our Hupmobile touring. I was proud of that sweater, and other members of our car club were amazed at the correct details matching our actual car. My parents had bought the 23 Hupp about 4 years before. With me is my little brother Ralph, who was 2-1/2 years old. On the running board was my best friend at the time..."Silver" the roughhouse poodle. 2nd photo was taken about 2018, and features my 2nd youngest grandson "Logan." Note that he is proudly wearing the same sweater. However in my old photo, you'll note the sleeves were getting too short for me by then, as I was nearly 11 years old. In the 2nd photo, you'll see that the sleeves are plenty long enough for Logan. But you'll also see the inevitable holes and wear which have befallen the ancient garment. 3rd photo is Logan showing the backside view of the same sweater.
    20 points
  40. Never meant to break any record. Just trying to share information and learn as I go. Thanks.
    20 points
  41. Took a break from Lincoln work for a few days. This was our place today for our annual open house. About 300 cars and more than 1000 people showed up and we raised more than $1500 for charity. Tomorrow I'll get back to work. Step one will be to cut off the muffler and see if it runs any cooler. Step two is taking the water pump apart and seeing what's going on in there. If nothing is obviously amiss, then I'll drill a hole in the top of the water pump to vent the air. I also have a new oil pump on its way so I'll eventually have to tear it down and get inside. Tomorrow will be interesting...
    20 points
  42. To me, "manual" brakes means no power assist. Is that the general consensus?
    20 points
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