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  1. My Brother decided to sell his Model A Roadster. A potential buyer showed interest but wanted his "mechanic" to check out the car, which he did. His only negative was that the A was difficult to shift, "probably because the synchronizers were badly worn".
    22 points
  2. Just took delivery of this 1969 Chevrolet C20 truck... it's been three years since I had my other C20 and I missed having one. This one came out of South Dakota, a Bean Farmer had it in his collection - all original truck, really nice! Thanks Bill & Dave with helping me with the transporting. Steve
    18 points
  3. Got a Ford Model TT stake truck yesterday for my birthday! Thanks for all of the birthday wishes. You folks are the best!
    18 points
  4. After many years in this hobby I finally found the proper tow vehicle. the fellow I bought it from assured me it had the factory towing package, although on close examination I question that. I bought it sight unseen and the seller even offered free gas for 6 months. Unfortunately the engine is seized so I'll need to find a good 460 to install.
    17 points
  5. Internet expert.........lots of that today. I belong to about fifteen clubs, one in particular has the “on line expert” who gives advise for everything..........including how to fix the lamp on the dark side of the moon. It’s interesting that his car is always breaking down on tours...........and he carries more tools than a Snap On truck. My other favorite thing.......guys making reproduction parts that have never owned a car........and sell the parts without having ever installed and tested them..........happens all the time.
    15 points
  6. Antique Auto Patina: Rat Rod Patina: To be kind... NOT patina: Old Man Patina:
    13 points
  7. Run don't walk. And I love these cars. This really looks like a parts car to be honest. If you pursue one of these I think you will find a lot of alternatives out there.
    11 points
  8. Hello My Friends, Attached is my latest project. It is about finished and scheduled for the upholstery shop during the coming Winter. It was a fun, low cost project. I wanted to build a car that looked like one of the 1907 Vanderbuilt racers. The frame is 1913 Cadillac, radiator shell 1916 Studebaker, Hood 1924 Hudson , Cowl 1928 Plymouth. All the sheet metal was reformed to fit. It is powered by a 32 VT golf cart axle. It is the ideal small town parade car. RH steering, dual chain drive, hydraulic brakes, won't over heat, no clutch and can creep along. (top speed about 20 MPH). Last 4th of July my 17 yr old grand daughter drove me in our town parade. It confused a lot of on lookers as a teenage girl was driving and it made no noise. Life is Good, Don Feeney in central Ohio.
    11 points
  9. We’ll fall is here. I am back at it. I hope to have a nice new running 237ci in my ‘38 Ply sedan by spring. Tappets and cam are in. I dropped the crank in tonight. Feeling good about it too. Very satisfying. I Mic’d mains and rods. Seem perfect. Ring gap well within spec. Measured bore, taper and out of round. Good. 1 valve guide was too high. 1 valve would not lap-in. Dropped down the one guide. Hand lapped all valves. Oil gallery port parts sealed up. Oil Pressure valve and spring in. Off to grab some plasti-gage now to check main bearing clearances.
    11 points
  10. These are nice cars, but they're wildly expensive to restore and make no mistake, you'll be starting from scratch with that car. I doubt that "rebuilt" engine counts as rebuilt anymore, seeing as it has been stored open outdoors. In fact, none of the previously restored parts are going to be usable if it has been outside for any length of time, so none of that "already done" work will be to your advantage. There's no point in doing a car like that half way, so you may as well plan on a full restoration. Unfortunately, it will probably cost $200,000+ to turn it into a decent $60,000 car. Heck, the interior fittings are gold plated on the '42s, so lord knows what that will cost... I understand that it's tempting, but that car will break you one dollar at a time.
    10 points
  11. I think the only legitimate use of the word relative to a car is one where decades of care and waxing have worn the paint thin on curves and edges, sometimes down to the primer on sharp edges. But never rusty.
    9 points
  12. I can agree with all of the responses, either "for" or "against" purchase, because we are all so different as far as age and available wealth. This car would look like a money pit to those who are very well funded. However, to a somewhat younger, very motivated person that feels he will never be able to afford a finished, nice riding big heavy "rich guys car", this car gives that person what seems like "his only chance to ever own one". Lots of fun could be had with the OP's Studebaker, but the sirens call of a big heavyweight open "classic" sure seems tempting when you have the skills, youth and stamina, but can't afford to buy a finished one. At my age now, and being at estate sales for decades, I now see only broken dreams with so many unfinished cars like this flooding the hobby. Even small steps on my unfinished cars seem so much more impossible now even though they are not, when I finally force myself do them. 20 years ago I would have known that this Lincoln is an easy save. Now, it's just another big mountain to climb and my sunsets are very limited. . .
    9 points
  13. This looks a little better. I’ll just keep working on it.
    9 points
  14. Well we went on the last tour for the year with the 1913 Buick on Friday with the Gilmore Museum in Hickory Corners, Mi. It was an 80+ mile tour for the day. Here we are getting ready to go. We had the oldest car on the tour. One of the other persons on the tour could not believe that we would drive a car this old on these tours and in all kinds of weather. I told him that we do and that is part of the adventure through life. We took our oldest grandson Clay on his first tour. He is six. We expect it to be the first of many more to come in the future. We had a great time with him and he really like the day with his grandparents riding in the old car. I can't wait until he can drive on the tours with us. 🙂 Start them young!! Here we are just after lunch. As has happened on other tours it was dry when we went in for lunch and was raining when we came out. The car below in the lower right corner is Joe & Julie Tonietto's Cadillac. They were on the tour with us. It was great to have a lot of other people we know on the tour. It rained all afternoon from a drizzle to a down pour. We have gotten to expect rain on almost every tour. Just part of the driving experience which is kind of replicating the driving "in the day" Below are some of the cars at the Gilmore museum. Our happy grandson getting to see all of the old cars helped to make his day. On this tour we went over 1,800 miles driving this car for the year. Not quite 2021 miles on the mileage challenge, but not bad for a 108 year old car.
    9 points
  15. For Sale on FB Marketplace in Decorah Iowa https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/item/373074634195314/?ref=search&referral_code=marketplace_search&referral_story_type=post&tracking=browse_serp%3A2a78c82f-e5f4-4ba2-bccc-b6f2bd84a678 Seller's Description: 1953 Nash Lemans · Coupe · Driven 49,000 miles. Dual carb jetfire engine. Radio .OD trans. Lemans Pinin Farina. Looks like a really cool car to me…..
    9 points
  16. I don't think you made a mistake by passing on the car--if something turns you off, that's the moment to look for something else. Trust your gut. The title issue on this one would be a hard pass for me, but some states aren't as problematic if there's a title skip. However, I will admit that it is VERY difficult to be someone else's judge on a car. I'm critical whenever I drive a car, but I also let old cars be old. What one person finds acceptable another might find unbearable. Some guys have their own hang-ups; I just talked to a guy who "only buys cars with Posi" and wanted me to tell him how well the Posi worked in a car we have for sale. How, exactly, do I do that? A burnout? Frequently people just don't know any better. Model As run the gamut and many of them are pretty sloppy, so that's how guys assume they all were. As a result, a sloppy one could be evaluated as "drives really well" by a guy who simply doesn't know the difference between what he has and a good one. It can be very frustrating to accurately answer subjective questions, especially if there's a potentially irate guy who didn't get what he expected waiting at the end of the line. What does "drives well" even mean? I have a 1960s convertible that really does drive well, but it's got one hell of a squeak/groan/rattle coming from the front suspension that we just can't find and fix. Starts easily, idles nicely, goes straight, rides well, plenty of power, looks awesome, but every bump--SKRRONNKK! So does that car still count as "drives well?" Is the noise separate from the act of driving? Would you be satisfied if I told you it drove really well but when you got it home it squeaked embarrassingly loudly over every bump despite being mechanically and dynamically excellent? The seller could have been more tactful, I suppose, but he's not someone who does this regularly and you're probably the 40th person he's talked to. The right thing for both parties is always for the buyer to see it in person and make up his mind. That way nobody makes a mistake and nobody gets blamed. Ultimately, I don't think it's fair to ask the seller to make judgement calls, the results of which may not match your own standards. It gets frustrating trying to figure out what people really want and what they really mean when they ask, "How does it drive?"
    9 points
  17. Is anyone other than me getting sick of seeing the word Patina? Seems like every ad where someone is too lazy to clean something up before trying to sell, patina is used to spice up the ad. They either clear coat over the surface rust or hose down the dirt and grime and it's suddenly "valuable Patina". It's a dismal and dreary day. I must be a grump. ☹️
    8 points
  18. Don't bother me none, what bothers me more is a some describing a 1937 Chevy as restored with a 350 with a turbo 400 with A/C
    8 points
  19. A fine copper or bronze piece weathered to a green oxide finish has a patina. A fine fire arm carried for years and showing wear through it's oiled blueing has a patina. A fine old oil painting showing fine checking has a patina. A still beautiful older women could be charitably described as having a fine patina (Only not to her face. Trust me on this one). Most everything else is just........... "Beat up"...............Bob
    8 points
  20. Headlights, marker lights, and front bumper installed. Rear bumper is getting assembled. Needed to take a break from the 57 and do some troubleshooting on a 66 Toronado this PM. Tomorrow, hopefully back to the 57.
    8 points
  21. That’s a picture of an Illinois governor before he wore his prison uniform!
    8 points
  22. Pt 3 That Friday the insulators arrived. The next day Adam returned and reinstalled the new springs and torqued the control arm bolts while the vehicle was supported with jack stands at the outer most point under the lower control arms. Once the springs settle, we will loosen and re-torque them. Adam also pointed out that the one outer tie rod end might need replacing but it wasn’t too far gone just yet. I mentioned that when I got the car Dan had casually said it had a steering issue. I wondered if that could have been it? So, we looked closer at the center link and found that the joint for the Pittman Arm to Center link was loose with quite a bit of play. Thankfully that is a castile nut with a cotter pin. Adam suggested checking the torque setting and re tightening. By this point he had roughly 6 hours into the entire project. I still had a few more to go. But they went quick. First, I tightened up that Pittman arm joint and installed a new cotter pin. Then new brake hoses were attached to the new calipers. The brake pads swapped over, and calipers mounted, then attached the new hoses to the brake lines. The brake hoses have a slight offset at the caliper end which caused a momentary concern in allocating the correct hose to the side I was working on. Then the bleeder was opened, and I moved all the tools to the other side. When I got back there was steady brake fluid flow out the bleeder, so it was tightened and capped. Then repeat on the other side. At this point I rechecked all the bolts and nuts for tightness and reinstalled the tires. After dropping it down and then pumping the brake pedal, the brake fluid level was topped off, and I drove it out of the garage. I was so relieved it was done. But I couldn’t even drive it further than back to the shed to swap it with the GS. It drove like a dream the couple of hundred feet. The next day I took it for a test ride. It will be perfect timing over the winter as the springs settle, and then I will have an alignment done. I did get the second set of lights and finished installing three more units in the garage. I also put three of them up in my attic. What a blessing. These things ARE the next best thing to sliced bread! Next up will be the GS which needs the same treatment.
    8 points
  23. Two of anything round, side by side, will distract a guy enough to sell him a car. Marketing people know that.
    8 points
  24. I liked it better a couple of years ago, when the pump shut off at around 50.00 to fill up my Diesel. I put in 85.00 today. Good thing it wasn't completely empty. Remember though us poor saps won't feel the effects of anything it's just the super rich that are going to feel it. Seems surprising that some people don't understand that even slight bumps on anything people on the low end of the earning scale make will be felt much more ,than by those at the top. I think of all the people you see putting 10.00 in their car. Does anyone really believe they are going to get far enough ahead to really be part of the new electric car crowd. They are driving $500-$1500 cars now With the cost of replacement batteries You won't be able to buy any kind of an electric car for under 5 grand and that's probably on the low end. I guess if the green energy people really want to make a difference they will have to buy a new car fairly often and donate their old one or sell it at a crazy discount so the poor can be as green.
    8 points
  25. Mark, I am shocked and saddened by the loss of your father. He was a great guy and always had a positive attitude. It is a great loss to our guys here on the forum. I was fortunate enough to meet and hang out with your dad a number of times over our Buick's over the years. We shared a wonderful roadtrip to Lance in Indiana a couple of years ago for parts. It was always a great time with your father. It is great that you are continuing the family tradition of working and restoring the cars in his collection. He always spoke highly of you and your going into automotive engineering. It's awesome that you are going to also continue the tradition of this forum that he started years ago. It was always great to hear his stories on cars, life, cruises and general everyday things we all encounter. My prayers go out to you and your family on Doug's passing. Jim
    8 points
  26. I guess I'm in the minority. I don't go to Hershey for the food.
    8 points
  27. Right coast, left coast now we hear from the middle coast. Spent 31 years trying to keep a plant in operation. To me and I think fellow employees, refurbish means to return a piece of equipment to operating condition and acceptable appearance. To restore would be to bring it back to original specs and appearances. Repair can lay anywhere between broken and refurbished with appearance being of little importance.
    7 points
  28. Age related patina is important on antique bronze statues, certain brass objects and other art forms to indicate they have survived over the ages. To some degree it’s also fitting on HPOF vehicles where keeping original paint and trim looking nice but still original. Using the word patina in place of rust is just plain wrong. As I age I really don’t need all the patina my body seems it wants to acquire and display.
    7 points
  29. As someone who does custom paint & restorations, when I read an ad selling a car & I see "great patina" I just read that as "needs paint" & figure that into the amount I am willing to offer for the car. God Bless Bill https://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/threads/nationwide-single-car-transport-hauling-open-or-enclosed.614419/
    7 points
  30. After studying the car for half an hour, I detect one major flaw.........It’s not mine. 😎
    7 points
  31. For us old timers with gastrointestinal issues, DO NOT, I repeat DO NOT use the 2 grunt method. Your pants may not be very happy with you if you do.😁
    7 points
  32. That sounds a lot like my world lately. You just try to do one simple task and it just goes down hill, and fast sometimes. I guess as you get older the things you use to be able to do with style and grace just takes more thinking and taking more time to get the same results as them younger years. Don't be hard on yourself. You will get it.
    7 points
  33. Finally screwed myself together well enough to go back to work on this thing. I'm just taking it apart enough for Frank Seme to do a valve job and replace the valves, but we'll see what he decides needs to be done--I'm not going to dictate to him. If he says it needs a full rebuild, I guess we'll start the tab a-runnin'. Hopefully not and maybe just new valves will make it healthy. At this point, I just don't know and don't want to allow myself to hope, so I'm going to expect the worst. Here's the post-mortem: Removed the air silencer, carburetor, and upper intake manifold first. None of the gaskets survived the heat, not the copper ones and not the Remflex. This isn't really a surprise. On the plus side, my crossover plugs seemed to keep the carburetor cool. High-temperature paint on the manifolds turned to dust. I don't know what I'm going to use to coat them now. I'm not too keen on shipping them somewhere given how delicate they are. Maybe that paint will survive if the manifolds aren't glowing red hot? One of the mounting ears on the end of the passenger-side manifold broke off, presumably due to flexing from the heat. Should I try to find a replacement manifold (sorry, no photo)? Heads came off without a fight and I'm grateful that every single head stud came out easily. Obviously they weren't in there very long, they were ARP studs, and I used proper lubricant and sealant, but man, it was nerve-wracking as hell loosening those acorn nuts. Yep, them's some bent valves.
    7 points
  34. I have one of these lights in the glove box of my '56. Never used yet.
    7 points
  35. Some shots before loading up for Saratoga Nationals in June
    7 points
  36. The Electra went for its annual inspection during which the mechanic investigated a bushing squeak at my request. He found one upper control arm front bushing was deteriorated and separating from the metal sleeve. Thus began the quest to refurbish the suspension. To begin, it was time to take stock of what was needed and how far I wanted to take the project. Part 1: With the advent of Fall and the prospect of cold weather I did not want the car to be down long. Also, I did not want to restore a small percentage of parts without any prospect for finishing the rest around them, so I decided to make this a repair instead of a restoration. In addition, this car has had a forward leaning “rake” since installing the heavy-duty rear springs and new shocks several years ago, which I did not like, so I thought it was a good time to install new springs. With that project would come new shocks and stabilizer links because, well, they had to come out to replace the springs. With all this it only made sense to install new lower control arm bushings as well. Then I read the Factory Service Manual (FSM) since I have watched, but never actually performed, this work. I ordered all the parts from the Advance Auto Parts store my son Doug manages. Control arm bushings are generally not that expensive, but as you can imagine, the labor to repair them adds up quickly. The shop I would normally use charges $119 per hour, and I estimated this was at least an 8—10 hour job. I checked around and the job was turned down at one place and I was told I would receive a call when the 2nd place could get me in. I am still wondering when or if I will ever get that call. I re read the manual and thought; this really doesn’t seem that difficult as much as time consuming. So, I asked my friend Adam (who is a professional mechanic) if he would consider doing the job on his off time? I figured we could do this in my garage thus leaving his one bay garage at home free for other’s work. That would help free his place just in case something went off schedule in this task. He already knows the Electra is extra clean, being an Oregon desert car, but told me that he did not have the one tool needed to press out the upper bushings. I said I would buy the tool and then give it to him when we were done. He agreed and I went home to contemplate how to stuff that car into my garage so the task could be done. This led to tackling a clean up project that I have avoided for more years than I care to admit. Re organizing my collection of good stuff, tossing years of crapola. The clean up went well. I also ordered the bushing press tool. The one bay, where the GS usually lives, would be the site for this job, and I started a major clean out. I moved a bunch of stuff to the shed and got a set of shelves to coordinate the things I had to keep inside. I also took the opportunity to toss out the old cardboard I had under the GS and put some new disposable cardboard down for the task at hand. Some things had to be moved to the other bay where the Super lives, so that lead to a general clean up in that side too. In the process I finally found room on my work bench for the substantial vise Adam had salvaged for me several years ago. I had so much success sorting, boxing, and labeling the stuff that I just kept going. I thought, if the Electra didn’t get done, I was already satisfied that this job was a success. And then the Electra was squeezed into the bay. The Electra has been in there before when I did the timing chain job a few years ago, but it is a tight fit. The passenger’s side rear view mirror just clears the 8 ft door opening. It cannot go to the wall in the back because that’s where the down pipe is for the bathroom upstairs, so I got it as close as I could. I saw that moving the one toolbox gave us clearance to do the driver’s side and, if needed we could open the side door of the garage to do the passenger’s side. There was just enough room to stand between the front bumper and closed garage door. I jacked it up and secured the lift with some jack stands. Adam came over to scout the set up and declaring it adequate, we proceeded to check the ball joints. They are in good shape and to be retained. Then he told me to begin loosening the bolts. I could also remove the old shocks and stabilizer links as well as the brake calipers. He also asked me to get new coil spring insulators. Working under the car in the light of my halogen floor standing work lamp, I decided it was so dingy with just the two overhead light bulbs that I wanted to update my lighting. There was an 8 pack of 4’ LED shop lights online for a very reasonable price, so we ordered them. The insulators become a whole different story. While I finally did get some, that situation is still not fully resolved as of this writing. At this point the new lights arrived and I set about installation. What a difference. And oh my God, what a mess I still had to clean! With a few days to kill before Adam could get back, I took the clean out more seriously since I could now see better. Another two bags of trash and some vacuuming later I am satisfied that this was the cleanest my garage has been in the 22 years since we moved in. And while I used 5 lights on the Super’s Bay, and I only had 3 left for this bay, that wasn’t a major concern as everything was so much brighter and the Electra was in the way of installing any further lights anyhow. But I did vow to buy another set of these lights. I took out the stabilizer links and shocks. Then I cleaned the area around the upper and lower ball joint nuts, and, after removing the cotter pins, I loosened but did not remove those nuts. Then I loosened the control arm bushing bolts and nuts. Finally loosening the upper control arms, the shim packs were removed, bagged, and tagged. All the bolts came off and I also noticed several more dry rotted bushings. This job was well overdue! Upon removing the driver’s side rear shim pack I though I heard something fall but could not find anything loose while poking around. The calipers were removed and set on a set of jack stands. At this point I figured that upon reinstallation it would be a good time to replace the flexible hoses which appeared to be the originals. To get to the line nuts the Electra had an inner shield that also had to be removed. At this point I loosened and then re tightened the line nut at the brake hose connection. I was happy that in each step all the fasteners cooperated, and nothing was damaged, especially the metal brake lines. to be continued.
    7 points
  37. This is in the glove box of my 54 Chevy, obviously a dealer add on
    7 points
  38. I could not attend Hershey, but was still able to see some old cars at my local cars & coffee in Great Falls, VA. Here are some pics. Enjoy!
    7 points
  39. OK, this thread just went from fire extinguishers and Auburns to eye candy..................... I am not complaining.
    7 points
  40. Well I'll have to switch to wood heat then and don't tell me I won't be able to use that. I have 16 acres of it and hopefully 28 by that time. If they try to outlaw that I'll just have more fuel for the boiler though it might be a little heavy being saturated with lead before I throw it in the boiler. It's always amusing to sit around and listen to people talk about carbon foot print then do nothing to prevent the forest fires which have a huge carbon footprint since there is not much emissions control when one torches a town, including the roofs and everything right down to the plastic garbage cans, No matter what we try to this is many times what we can possibly curb by going to even zero emission cars. Oh I forgot is Mexico going to have the same level of emissions control because if not, well the wind blows north and all their pollution is going to blow right over us. Only rational people with common sense seem to be able to see the easy solutions to the problems, but seems policy is being created by feelings and not brains nowadays.
    7 points
  41. If you are going to pay up, you need to know details about the vehicle. If the guy doesn't want to share what he knows about it, pass. On the other hand, 4 1/2 hours away does not seem to be too far to go to verify the details you are interested in knowing.
    7 points
  42. Pried high for sure. This 66 Ford Country Squire brought around $11,000. Less than 30,000 miles in excellent condition, original paint
    6 points
  43. 6 points
  44. A pad or two of period matches and don't forget a flashlight of the proper age for the car. Finding one of those without corrosion might be a problem. Also maybe sunglasses.
    6 points
  45. You share your observations I share mine. That's all we can do. Smart , rational people can draw their own conclusions from that. We should be using less as more older less fuel efficient cars are replaced with new ones. Atleast that was the plan of the whole cash for clunkers. Mother nature requires we replace our cars in the rust belt every 10 years or less as she eats them alive. Of course fuel demand could be up from all the people that have entered the country this year. If we end up adding 2 million people we know of in a year that's a whole lot more demand just to bus them around and provide service for them.
    6 points
  46. This is what happens to you after 250 days of lockdown. You make stupid shit like this in your garage. I’ll have no excuse for having dirty cars now. I was getting a bit sick of mixing up my cleaning rags. I have accepted that I have car cleaning issues don’t worry. I’m seeing someone about my problems 😬😂
    6 points
  47. It was a great Hershey all the way around! A broad panorama of automotive history displayed and offered for sale. Folks seemed to be glad to again attend a public event we all used to take for granted, but wont any more. The best part is the conversations with old friends and those struck up by chance with people of common interest. Only regret is not connecting with some fellows who I had hoped to, but that's unavoidable. The variety and quality of those in the show was sublime. Although there were noticeable empty spaces, when 'normalcy' completely returns that may improve. Some folks simply haven't much left worth carrying in to sell, only retain their space as a matter of convenience. Setting an area aside for them to repair to may be worth considering. Enforcement of the no current political messages will be appreciated. Society is already awash in such divisive, contentious messages. Such violates a basic tenet of Business Practice 101: by displaying one's political outlook at one's business affectively dismisses half one's potential customers. Personally, I've bypassed vendors who engaged in such displays regardless of what they had on offer.
    6 points
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