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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/25/2021 in all areas

  1. I think that most people are just trying to connect about us and our old cars. Sometimes I get playful, like my in my original post, then I laugh and so do they. My grandfather (father, uncle, aunt,...) had one like this. Respond in kind. Could they imagine the value of a brass car? Squint a little bit and don't think, in some way, that our cars do look like giant Model Ts to the uninitiated? If they mention that it looks like "Chitty....." I just agree. Could be! I liked the movie and wouldn't it to be fun to have a car like that? Then I offer them to sit in my "Chitty.. " and take
    6 points
  2. Lapped the valves which was pretty easy since the engine had less than 10 hours on it. Getting the valves back in went smoothly as well. Sat the head on the engine and will button things up next week. Time is still limited but I did make some progress at least.
    5 points
  3. It's a lot easier to fool someone than to convince them they've been fooled. Look at the world around us--you really think it's at all difficult to pull the wool over people's eyes with just words?
    4 points
  4. If you do not have the time to do it right the first time, where are you going to find the time to fix it a second time?
    4 points
  5. 4 points
  6. I typically dislike all of the tech weenies, but you have to give Musk credit. Regardless of how he did (con or otherwise) he created the most valuable car company in the world from scratch in 15 years. If asked the question 15 years ago we all would have said that was impossible. Also, if you look back at the history of his companies, he basically risked all his wealth more than once (around 200-300 million he earned from paypal). I elevate Musk over Gates, Zuckerberg, etc who are mostly one trick ponies. He really has had some innovative ideas and managed to execute o
    4 points
  7. I am the one who bought the car on Friday. It seems like a decent car. It has sat for the past several years after the previous owner's dad passed away. For the most part, everything I have tried on the car seems to work. The car has every option available in 1956 except for air conditioning. However, there is an A/C system in the trunk. It has power windows, power seat, power steering, power brakes, Wonderbar radio, etc. It also has the Packard torsion bar suspension. The car is self-leveling. When weight is applied to the rear or front of the car, the car suspension will compensate itself ba
    3 points
  8. I fondly recall the years that the now defunct auction house brought the traveling circus to the Giant Center during the Fall Meet. After a long day of selling in the South Chocolate field we would wander over the bridge to watch the auction. Every car was described as the “best example in the world”, by auctioneers that knew very little about the cars they were selling. We we’re not alone. Some of the heavy hitters in the collector car world were enjoying the entertainment. After a few hours we would wander back to our trucks, crawl in, and be asleep by 9pm. Wow, we were living
    3 points
  9. Anybody that utters "You should call Jay Leno to buy that" instantly becomes a non-person to me, and not because I don't appreciate Jay. Also, the answer to the question "What is it worth?" is "Not as much as I have in it.".
    3 points
  10. The general public has no idea - which is why WE are supposed to inform THEM. If your attitude is to deride them or make fun of them when they make a wrong assertion or ask a dumb question - you are no ambassador for the hobby. Take your car home so you don't cause more problems for the rest of us. Only by being polite and respectful to the public will we have a chance to grow this hobby.
    2 points
  11. I agree CB. I've attended and entered many car shows and find that many people who come to browse are not really "car people". Old and young alike, they are just the curious public and usually pretty friendly. I've never been offended by any question that the uninitiated may ask, including "How much is it worth?" I think it's a commonly asked question because people are truly interested and/or curious if their future could include one of these cars. I will always tell people who ask the approximate value of whichever car I'm displaying. I enjoy this interaction, even if I have to a
    2 points
  12. I accounted for all 787 1936 Pierces built during one round trip to San Diego in 1995, from bystanders who swore that their relative/neighbor/boss had one "just like this." If I do any correcting at all, it's very gentle in how it's phrased. Almost three years ago, we were displaying the 1918 at a car show in Danville, CA, when a man born in 1918, accompanied by his adult grandchildren, came up. We asked him if he'd like to sit in the car and be photographed. The look on his face absolutely made my entire month!
    2 points
  13. First Cobalt Corp is a North American venture with stakes in Idaho and Cobalt, Ontario that may become a more local, as it were, producer. For the history buffs in the crowd, Cobalt, Ont was the sight of a massive silver rush in the early 1900's that produced more in dollar value, than the more famous gold rushes. Interesting little town in northern Ontario. Don
    2 points
  14. The last transmission that I replaced I used a power washer at the end of the lines by the transmission. When I first started to try to flush with soap, nothing would come out. I then turned the soap off and still nothing. I kept alternating between the two lines and eventually the big slug of junk came out of the cooler/line. After alternating back and forth I eventually got a clear stream. I then ran air through the cooler system for a while to dry it out. Never had another transmission problem after that. You must flush the transmission cooler during any transmission repair.
    2 points
  15. Electric cars...Meh. They’re still all part of eating up this planet. We’ve had a good run. Those alive to actively participate in this forum have had it pretty darn great on this planet. I’m not a big fan of the electric car. I’m not convinced its the answer. Look up Cobalt Mining in Africa. Its needed for battery production. Where does plastic come from? I believe refined oil. Copper wire for all those Tesla drive motors? Mining. Electricity. Where’s it coming from? Nuclear and Hydro seem to be the majority producers. Damming and flooding valleys for more hydro power? Boy that’s a t
    2 points
  16. You start out saying your "tow vehicle is overheating"... When was the last time the cooling system was serviced? New radiators are relatively inexpensive. I would get a aluminum radiator and add a row of cooling (if it is two row go to three row) and flush the system. Most tow vehicles offer a towing package from factory, I would start with that radiator and trans cooler.
    2 points
  17. What maybe the first Chandler car in 1913. President Chandler driving with other from Lozier men in the car.
    2 points
  18. 1913 Chandler "Grandpa" (4th one built) with Col. King Stanley and his wife. I just noticed that this photo is probably from the early 1920's looking at the license plate. Given that the car had traveled over 269,000 miles at this point the top has been replaced at least once. Chandler introduced their "bowtie" rear window in 1923 I think. The Stanley's probably picked up on this when they had their new top made.
    2 points
  19. Studebaker dealership in Monrovia CA along Route 66. Building has been many things since then (1924) and thankfully still survives.
    2 points
  20. I'm no fanboy of the man. Lots of warts on the the man and his products to be found. Kind of like old car guys and their restorations! His timelines are always optimistic ( so are mine) but the difference between him and most of us is that he eventually delivers . Like Henry Ford and his assembly line, Musk doesn't always invent the technology but he is either the first to apply it or apply it effectively.That he does without appearing to be anti-Semitic ( like some of the historical icons) is a plus; although admittedly, that could be tweet away like his misguided COVID opinions.
    2 points
  21. It won’t be long before a talented young guy can set up a small machine shop in a two car garage for very little initial investment, and make a great living from home without insane overhead. Using a five axis machine to do 99 percent of what the antique car hobby needs is beyond any economic or time efficient use. Never mind the cost of the machine, or programming time. When I get the White water pump finished, I will post a story about an interesting issue that has come to light recently.
    2 points
  22. Joe, You need to come up sometime when we have an event. We can put you to work in our machine shop.
    2 points
  23. So true Joe! Nothing replaces hands-on. The University of Maine has worked hard to address this with their Engineering Technology programs which do just that. For instance the Mechanical Engineering Technology students actually spend a lot of time in the machine shop during their first year working with manual machines. They also required to complete capstone projects their senior year. These have ranged from designing and fabricating a pill crusher for a hospital to rebuilding a compound air compressor for a steam locomotive to completing the restoration of a 19 ton Steam Lombard
    2 points
  24. Bernie heard about my Riviera. He wanted to check it out and get his picture taken with it. Who am I to say no?
    2 points
  25. Finally got some time in the shop! I got the carbs taken apart, cleaned and re-assembled. I ended up using a complete rebuild kit so all the gaskets, washers, jets, needles, etc are new. I might have gotten away with just cleaning everything but the rebuild kit was about $120 and I didn't think it was worth risking. For the cylinder head I decided to take out the intake valves. I'm glad I did because it wasn't good. I don't have a picture to show it, but there was some strange stuff in there. It was more like mold than corrosion but it certainly wasn
    2 points
  26. Add me to the C4 bandwagon...this '96 Lt4 car was my daily for a couple of years. 28mpg , cold A/c, hot heat, and overall comfortable, although it had been modified by a previous owner for Autocross and sat a bit low and rode a bit rougher than stock. That Lt4 sounded like angels singing, when it was wrapped up close to redline and shifted properly. Of course if I didn't have the benefit of knowing and training many of the local boys in blue already, I probably would have gotten to know them real quick... on ramps and roundabouts were major fun. This was my fourth C4, having previously ow
    1 point
  27. Looks to me like a 1936 Dodge.
    1 point
  28. 1955 Dodge. Here they are on the '55 I used to own....
    1 point
  29. Agree with that. Here is an actual conversation with a 70-ish year old “car guy” from when I took my ‘14 Maxwell to a local cruise-in: CG: Is that a Model T? me: It is a 1914 Maxwell. CG: Maxwell? What’s that? me: It was made by Maxwell Motors 1904 to 1924. CG: I never heard of that kind of Model T. Of course, when I visit my father-in-law (97 yrs old), the term is “T-Model”; not “Model T.”
    1 point
  30. Talk to an experienced honest transmission repair shop. The heat exchanger in your radiator cools the transmission fluid in the summer and warms it in the winter. It is the best way to cool the transmission fluid as it leaves the pan and cycles through to return. Auxiliary coolers are not as efficient and are not a substitute. They are a supplemental cooling add on. I just learned this on my last transmission rebuild. The owner of the truck before me did not have the factory heat exchanger on the radiator thorou
    1 point
  31. some parts have arrived for the new engine. things have begun to get out of hand a bit. (dont tell my wife) drilled and tapped holes for the oil baffle in lifter galley, it eliminates the need to use the bath tub style intake gasket. wanted this done before the block goes to the machine shop so i'm not creating metal filings after final cleaning. notice how much lighter the new piston and rod are compared to the original parts. 136 grams is a decent reduction and the new pistons are forged and larger.
    1 point
  32. Hot rodders may not be purists but according to your above definition, many are perfectionists.
    1 point
  33. Interesting that what I am reading indicates that cobalt is being phased out of EV batteries. For example, if what I read is true, the new Tesla vehicles being built in China are using iron phosphate electrodes. Last I checked neither iron nor phosphate is in very short supply. EV battery prices have dropped nearly 90% in the last 10 years. While the trend is flattening, it is still going down and will shortly be at or under a price that will make a EV cheaper than an internal combustion engine vehicle soon. Probably in the next 2 to 5 years. And that is cost competitive without go
    1 point
  34. Thought I'd close the loop on my door jamb switches. Ended up sending them off to Gordon Wolfgang to be rebuilt and they now work perfectly. Mr Wolfgang was also very patient and flexible when it came to payment, somehow taking weeks for a check to get from CA to him. Thanks for the recommendation and thanks to Mr Wolfgang.
    1 point
  35. Every Cadillac must have been a gangster's, every Mercedes was Hitler's, etc. Sometimes it is better if people don't talk.
    1 point
  36. YOM plate on my '64 Grand Prix...
    1 point
  37. On the field at Pebble Beach, perfection is just the ticket that gets you into the running. It’s common to have six or more 100 point fresh restorations in a class. That’s why we see the cars on tour.........trying to get a step up above the 100 point mark. They even check the clock to see it’s making correct time. One of my favorite things to do with competitors in our class is to complement them on a great car and the “head to head” competition they are involved in. I once said to a close friend and a same in class competitor..........any eight of the cars in the class would be an automatic
    1 point
  38. Kaizen principle. Good enough never exists. You can always make improvements.
    1 point
  39. Pay attention to the details not only in old cars but in everything you do and you will eliminate many problems. Perfection is a goal never reached but well worth striving too accomplish. dave s
    1 point
  40. Perfectionists make sure things are done right. They do things how they are supposed to be done. They do research. They do not take the easy path. Yes it takes more time. Yes it is harder. Yes it costs more. Without perfectionists in this hobby you might as well start building hot rods.
    1 point
  41. It blew up when it hit the ground in a massive explosion. Although, in the world we live in now that could be considered successful. Not too many years ago, Tesla was dead on the vine and the Feds stepped in and flopped open the checkbook. There is no way to total the amount of money Tesla has received from the US taxpayers, it's many Billions, 5 Billion in one chunk, many more in buyer subsidies, carbon credits etc. Hey, I'm all for someone bringing a new product to market and making a fortune, good for them, it's what makes this country what it is or was. How about doing it fairl
    1 point
  42. Automotive machining is rather interesting, it’s not done to very tight or critical tolerances compared to many things. That said, today the sloppiness of what most automotive machine shops are producing is stunning. Also lack of cleanliness is astounding. Most shops can’t even keep things square. The good news is the 40’s to the 70’s machine shop equipment is selling for scrap prices......along with the tooling. It’s justifiable to buy a good piece of equipment for only occasional use if you have the room. We have bought several machines over the years just for the tooling that came with it..
    1 point
  43. Why not just buy the real car?
    1 point
  44. Similar construction to the Grand Hotel on Mackinac Island, but seems reversed. This is an old photo of the Mt. Washington Hotel: And the Grand Hotel:
    1 point
  45. According to an article in Skinned Knuckles, your headlight lenses are Depress Beam number H100-95. The same lens is used 1929-1930 52,70,72,75,77,90. Zeke
    1 point
  46. The Dodge Brothers had never aspired to build an “Upper Class” car as you put it. In the words of the Dodge Brothers, “Dependable” was used the most. The Dodge Brothers were focussed very much on mass production and their dealership network was the envy of all, in 1920 Dodge was second in the USA in production numbers. The untimely early demise of both Brothers in 1920 caused a decline and in 1928 Dodge Brothers was sold to Chrysler, another company focussed on numbers rather than “Class” The 1933 Dodge was a car in the Chrysler range which included Plymouth and Desoto as wel
    1 point
  47. I am not convinced putting the sending unit on the side is a terrible design. Ford got away with it for decades (Chrysler too IIRC) using a locking ring and a square cut o ring. They still leak when the sender is up on top. The gas sloshes all over when you drive, comes out the bad seal on top, and the whole car stinks like gas. It's just a lot harder to see where it is coming from. By the time you get the tank down, the gas will have evaporated. Hopefully there's a tell-tale stain or something. It is also hard to tell whether your repair really worked. I hope
    1 point
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