Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/14/2015 in all areas

  1. WOW! What an experience THIS has been. Thank you, thank you so very much all of you who have been concerned about Cherrie and me. I always hear about this stuff happening to others and I know for a fact I never thought we could dodge a bullet like this. I always expected it to happen since we live so close to forests. I am practically in tears whilst writing this. We were extremely lucky to have been spared the agony of losing our home and our cars. We got out a few minutes before the fire reached our part of town and ended up at the coast in Brookings, Oregon where Cherrie's brother lives. We have seen a photo from a friend of our sweet little home and block still standing. Mostly everything around our block has been decimated. The little town of Talent, south of us was nearly completely destroyed, too. I have no cell phone or tablet so it took me a while to get on this computer. Then I had to try to remember my password since I left them ll at home along with my computer. YES....the only things I got out were two sentimental watches and my radiator mascot collection. I stood in our living room and looked around and told myself, "what's the use?" No matter what I took with me would NOT be enough. As of now, we are waiting for word on when to go back home. The road we took to get to the coast is now on fire and closed. If HELL exists, this is it. I will try to get back with you folks soon. Thanks again for the caring and loving messages. I am SO glad to be here to answer them.
    52 points
  2. After hearing of the passing of our mutual friend Carl Fielding, C_Carl, or Cadillac Carl, and all the kind things members have to say about him, I thought it would be especially important to have a thread where we can share our positive experiences with other members of this community so they can know our appreciation. This place is chock full of awesome people who go above and beyond to help their fellow enthusiasts. I'll start: EdinMass, for obvious reasons. Thanks for keeping my projects moving forward when I was ready to throw in the towel. alsancle, for picking me up and brushing me off more than a few times when old cars kicked my butt, and convincing me to get back in there and keep fighting. Grimy, for offering technical tidbits that are especially useful and timely, and for introducing me to the awesomeness that is the Pierce-Arrow Society. I'll have one yet! AB-Buff, for sharing a rather remarkable amount of knowledge about these Lincolns we own, up to and including rebuilding my distributor and filling it full of new parts, gratis. You define what makes this hobby awesome. WaltG, for being the conscience and artistic patron saint of this entire community. MCHinson for being a consistent, patient, and calm voice of reason during the frequent storms that are my personality. NeilMorse, you're a friend I've never met with a willingness to tackle projects that intimidate me, thereby shining a light for others to follow. Thank you. GregLaR, for that time you pissed me off royally by calling me out for being less than diplomatic. You forced me to be introspective and examine my beliefs and values, and thereby made me a better person. Gratitude. Bloo, JVPuleo, maok, you guys always show up in the knick of time with just the right technical information to solve my problems. That fills me with more optimism than almost anything else. Thanks to everyone who participates for making this place awesome.
    46 points
  3. So today a newer (as in 2 years) neighbor stopped us today, seems her 14 year old has been scoping out the Model A but was a bit shy... Well, after an invitation, we spent a nice 45 minutes in the freezing shed going over the A. My new pal knows a bit about the era as well, and cited a recent Duesenberg siting in Western MA, how many 14 year olds today even know what an ACD car is... Well, he left with a stack of Hemmings, and in a few weeks I will see if he is interested in taking a ride, maybe helping with some basic maintenance... And so it starts! 👍😊
    36 points
  4. The first iteration of this forum was started in June 1997. There are now 100++ forums, 30+ participating clubs, and 95,000 registered users from all over the world. In our most recent full month, we saw over 15,000 new topic/posts, 500,000 visits, and over 3,000,000 page views. The AACA forums is now arguably the largest forum of its kind, focused exclusively on antique automobiles of all makes and models. I want to thank the AACA Board of Directors and specifically Steve Moskowitz. A few other standouts who have managed and mentored me (ie drove me crazy sometime) including Howard Scottland, Terry Bond, Earl D. Beauchamp, Jr., Janet Ricketts, and in particular - Ron Barnett. They followed (and funded) my vision since day 1 to keep this a free open forum for antique automobile enthusiasts. A few participate in this forum even today. Others have passed, and as I write this, I'm reminded of how much they are missed. I want to thank the Moderators. Without them this forum would have gone the way of many other car forums due to off topic posts and personality clashes. Their time and efforts go unrecognized and unappreciated but make this forum what it is. I especially want to thank the forum users. 99.99% of you follow the forum rules and freely contribute your time, knowledge, and talents to enlighten and educate people about automobile history, and to help keep our antique automobiles on the road and properly restored. I never visioned 24 years ago I'd still be managing this forum. Few in my personal life know (or care) about this forum, but for me it's become my unique mission to help keep our antique automobiles and this hobby alive. Thank you for participating. Peter Gariepy
    34 points
  5. Just wishing everyone a very Merry Christmas. While most of us are having a holiday that is substantially reduced in family members, we still have much to be thankful for. Enjoy time with family and stay safe. I would also like to thank everyone who interacted with me on the 1917 White........I have a bunch of new friends associated with the purchase and service of the car. We join the hobby for the cars......but we stay because of our friends.
    33 points
  6. Seems like decades since my search started and I would never be in the right place at the right time to buy one of the cars at the top of my bucket list. Well thanks to a lead from Ed and him stepping back (a big thank you is due) so I could get it, the day has arrived and it's sitting in my Garage. Unfortunately with winter and the uphill grade to the garage we unloaded it right into the garage so pictures will be forthcoming but not real good like outside photos with natural lighting. Is it time for a name change from Auburnseeker?
    33 points
  7. If you're a white guy older than 50 and still sporting dreadlocks, you have made a very wrong turn in your life somewhere.
    32 points
  8. Houston, we found the problem... No need for any more testing after this. There's obviously not a drop of water being moved by the water pump. The pump and engine are full enough that the pump should be pushing a whole lot of water through it and through the outlet tubes. Temperature skyrocketed again, as it always does because, obviously, the water in the engine isn't going anywhere and just sits there boiling. I'm draining the bucket now--it served its purpose so there's no need for it to sit there leaking all over the shop overnight. Engine was running somewhat poorly because I had to prop the choke open with the little yellow cap so I could walk around and shoot the video. With finer choke adjustment, it runs quite well. Sounds gnarly, but runs well. Oil pressure is all over the place but I figure that's due to poor idle quality. It goes up when it's supposed to, which makes me happy. Water pump comes off tomorrow and I'll get it back to Jim for analysis and repair. Good that I found the problem and it's very solvable.
    30 points
  9. I'm looking into my all-seeing/all-knowing carbide headlamp right now and it's telling me that if I like old cars, I can continue playing with them. When I'm gone someone else can worry about how much my car is worth. Meantime, having fun is worth spending money on. Terry
    30 points
  10. Behold the power of this forum! I was showing some visitors out and turned around to find Jason AKA @K8096 in my shop bearing gifts because he'd been reading about my water pump woes. First, sorry I didn't recognize you right away, Jason, and second, check out the awesome: Jason had a spare water pump that he's allowing me to dissect and measure. It's not viable (check out the big crack down the side of the oil cooler housing) but he's certain that it has never been apart. I can pull the rear cover and take some measurements of the impeller's location on the shaft and in relation to the housing. I've got it soaking in penetrating oil now so hopefully it comes apart without much of a fight tomorrow. I'll go get my pump from Jim's place and do some dissecting. Thanks, Jason!
    29 points
  11. Today is Pearl Harbor Day. Remember what that means. Never Forget.
    29 points
  12. Received latest issue of Hemmings Motor News yesterday. You know, the bible of the old car hobby, the source for cars and parts that we've used for years. I first started subscribing in 1965, and never missed a year. So, last month they ran an editorial that discussed, among other things, the death of the old car hobby, in regard to pre-war cars. That's pre-World War II, for you young'uns. Oh wait, there are no young people interested in those cars, according to some. From the letters section, two things, both from same letter, and Sir, if you read this forum, no apologies, I think you're wrong: 1-"....all the old folks who owned or enjoyed the hobby of the 1910-1950 era cars are dying off or too old to enjoy them anymore, and want to sell them. Who is going to buy these cars that are out there?" Now, in the same issue, in the auction reports: 1910 Cadillac - sold, $104,500 1904 Premier - sold, $341,000 1909 Thomas - not sold, not meeting reserve, $580,000 1929 Packard 645 phaeton - sold, $319,000 1923 Pierce sedan - sold, $107,800 No one wants them? Really? It's not that NO ONE wants them, it's that SOME PEOPLE don't want them, and they thus assume NO ONE wants them. Their thinking is "I don't like to eat broccoli, so I don't think anyone likes to eat broccoli". This is flawed logic. Sure, there are older guys collecting cars, but there are also younger guys coming along who have money and like the old cars. Maybe not as many as it used to be, but it sure seems to be enough, otherwise prices on good cars would be dropping drastically. I keep hearing gloom and doom, and "I'm going to wait a few years and buy those cars for pennies on the dollar", but it sure doesn't seem to be coming true. The market segment that IS dropping in price/value is the project car area. The cost of restoration these days is so high that projects just won't bring good money. 2: ".....don't like how they [old cars] drive. Try driving a 1930 Model A on a trip. No seat belts, hard to start, drives like a truck, and you better know how to double clutch those old cars....not really fun to drive" Seriously? He states he "sold his Model A", well, sure, I would have sold a worn out, neglected, poor condition Model A too. Instead of fixing the car, he assumes, as many do, that ALL Model A's, oh wait, let's include ALL pre war cars, are horrible driving vehicles. Astounding. The burgers down at my local diner are awful, thus all burgers everywhere must be awful. You guys out there that get it, know how well nicely a maintained or nicely restored car early car drives. You guys who don't get it, that's fine, just don't eat any burgers, cause if you did find and eat a good burger, then you'd have to change your mind. Changing minds is very difficult these days. My rant for the day.....
    29 points
  13. I finally made a trip down a portion Route 66 in my ’64 Skylark. Making a cross-country road trip has been a dream of mine since I was a kid, having inherited the wanderlust from my father who had the same dream but sadly never got the chance to fulfill it. While I was growing up all our vacation travel was done by car. Flying anywhere for vacation wasn’t a thing with my generation or within my family’s income bracket. One of the more memorable trips was the one we took from Paterson, NJ to Miami Beach in 1965, much of it via US 1 before I-95 was completed. Pre-interstate highway travel was at once tedious and full of things to see. While Route 66 has become famous for its roadside attractions and an icon of pre-interstate highway travel with its quirks and small towns, it was not at all unique in that regard. I vividly remember many of the sights along US 1 including kitschy roadside attractions and Burma Shave signs, many of which were still standing in 1965. I decided long ago that if I ever got the chance to travel Route 66 it would be in a car that could have traveled the famous road back in its heyday, or at least before the road was decommissioned as a US highway. My Skylark would do nicely, being old enough to satisfy me and yet new enough to travel easily on modern highways when necessary. I bought the Skylark nearly seven years ago and had been working on it up until last year. It needed only minor repairs and upgrades to make me feel comfortable taking it on a long journey. I replaced the water pump and thermostat, all belts and hoses, motor mounts, had the carburetor rebuilt by a respected specialist, rebuilt the power steering pump, installed new seat and shoulder belts, new alternator and regulator, completely rebuilt the brake system with new steel lines and hoses, master cylinder and brake booster with conversion to a dual-circuit system, wheel cylinders, and brake shoes and drums. About two weeks before I left home, I had a new set of tires installed. Anything that wasn’t broken that I could readily replace on the road was stashed in the trunk like a spare fuel pump, tune-up parts, spark plugs and ignition coil. I was ready as I would ever be. Prior to embarking on the trip, I researched Route 66 to death to identify the alignments I wanted to take and the sights I wanted to see. I bought a copy of Jerry McClanahan’s Route 66: EZ66 GUIDE For Travelers, which is an excellent resource that provides a wealth of information with turn-by-turn directions. Because I would be traveling alone without the help of a navigator to read the directions to me, I needed something that would allow me to keep my eyes and the Skylark on the road. I found the Route 66 Navigation app that works on smart phones, and it worked very well for me. It uses GPS navigation to guide you along the route by giving verbal instructions just like any GPS navigation system. It worked like a charm. I had limited time for my trip, so I planned only to go as far as Tulsa before turning around and heading back up to Auburn for the Buick gathering at the beginning of July. I didn’t feel the need to do every inch of ‘66 so I skipped the eastern terminus in downtown Chicago and started in Joliet. Days One and Two I left home on the morning of June 22nd and traveled I-80 to Austintown, OH where I spent the first night. On Day Two I headed for Joliet, IL where I would spend the second night before getting on ’66 the morning of Day Three. On the way to Joliet, I passed by South Bend where I made a side trip to visit the Studebaker National Museum. Having owned two Studebakers in the past I didn’t want to miss the opportunity to visit the marque’s hometown and tour the museum. It was smaller than I expected but well worth the trip. Day Three: Getting on Route 66 from Joliet to Springfield, IL The first Route 66 landmark I encountered was the Gemini Giant in Wilmington, IL. I stopped to photograph it only because it’s there. The luncheonette where it’s located was closed, otherwise I’d have dropped a little coin there. You’ll note that most of the photos include my car. My wife isn’t retired yet so I was traveling alone, and the car had to substitute for a traveling companion in the photos. My next stop was Ambler’s Service Station in Dwight, which is a preserved vintage gas station that serves as a museum. The attendant was very friendly and informative, and I had a most pleasant time there. My next stop was Pontiac, IL where I hit two museums, the Pontiac-Oakland Auto Museum and the Route 66 Hall of Fame and Museum. Both were fun to walk through, although the auto museum was of more interest to me than the bric-a-brac at the other one. While at the Route 66 Hall of Fame and Museum I had the pleasure of meeting a couple and their young daughter from Hawthorne, NJ, a neighboring town to Paterson where I grew up. They overheard me answer the museum attendant’s question about where I was from, and a nice conversation about NJ ensued (if you can believe there are nice conversations about NJ). The last stop of note for the day was in Atlanta, IL where I visited the Atlanta Museum. I arrived near closing time but one of the attendants offered to stay on and give me a tour. It’s not a Route 66 oriented museum, but instead focuses on local town history. I didn’t think I’d be interested, but as it turns out it was very interesting to learn about the town and share in the enthusiasm the attendant had for her home. I traveled on to Springfield, where I spent the night. Day Four: Springfield, IL to Fairview Heights, IL I spent a fair amount of time in Springfield visiting the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum, his home, and his tomb. All were well worth seeing for those interested in this president. I had lunch at the Cozy Dog Drive-In so I could try a much-celebrated corn dog. It was my first corn dog, and unlike other notable firsts in my life I will not remember this one fondly. I can’t really say if the corn batter tasted good or bad, for it needed to have a taste at all for me to have made that judgment. The best thing I can say is that it stayed down. My next stop of note was Country Classic Cars in Staunton, IL. The welcome I received was colder than a mother-in-law’s kiss, and the asking prices vs the conditions of the vehicles left me with an impression that I’m at a loss to describe in polite terms. It’s well worth visiting, but only if you don't stop. Henry’s Rabbit ranch was a short way down the road, also located in Staunton. The place was an absolute hoot, and Henry was a very pleasant and engaging character whose company I thoroughly enjoyed. I spent about a half hour there talking just about everything except for religion and politics. Another worthwhile stop, but for the conversation more so than the detritus outside. I stopped at the old Chain of Rocks Bridge in Madison, IL on my way to Fairview Heights where I spent the night. There are several old bridges along Route 66, this being a fine example of one that’s now closed to vehicular traffic. Day Five – Fairview Heights, IL to Lebanon, MO First thing in the morning I crossed the Mississippi into St. Louis and headed to the National Museum of Transportation where I met Jim, who goes by the name Ohjai on the forums here with his beautiful ’62 Skylark convertible. The museum was a worthwhile stop with several rare and unusual cars on display. They also have a selection of rail cars on display. Afterward Jim and I had lunch at Uncle Bill’s in Manchester before I continued down the road. A very nice visit with a pleasant fellow. I happened upon the Jesse James Wax Museum in Stanton, MO and did a self-tour. There were lots of interesting artifacts on display, and there was a video that provided interesting facts about the famous outlaw. Another worthwhile stop for those interested in such things. My next stop was the Wagon Wheel Motel in Cuba, another historic Route 66 landmark. I wanted to overnight there, but it didn’t fit into my schedule because I arrived much too early in the day to stop for the night. There was a local cruise-in going on at the motel, so I found an empty parking space and crashed the event. I continued to the Munger Moss Motel in Lebanon where I spent the night. I spent some time chatting with the elderly owner who had some interesting stories about surviving as a small motel operator during the height of the COVID 19 pandemic. She essentially runs the place by herself with some help from her daughter. The room cost me less than $60 for the night including tax, and it was worth every penny if you get my drift. Even though the motel isn’t likely to be featured among the world’s best in Conde Nast Traveler I’d stay there again, and I would encourage others to do so as well if only to help the place survive. Day Six – Lebanon, MO to Carthage, MO Springfield, MO is home to the Route 66 Car Museum. They had a fairly large selection of cars, both common and unusual. I was surprised to find a Horch on display since they seem to be quite rare, at least here in the US. I had only seen one other that was reported to have belonged to General Rommel, The Desert Fox of WW2 fame. A bit of useless trivia: Horch was part of the Auto Union and is represented by one of the four rings in the Audi logo. The Gay Parita Service Station in Everton was my next stop along Route 66. I spent about an hour and a half on the porch having a cigar and talking with owner George and various other Route 66 travelers. The ghost town of Spencer was a short drive down the road from Everton where I came upon a small gathering of local Corvair owners. We had some fun admiring each other’s cars and swapping stories. My last stop of the day was in Carthage, where I spent the night at the Boots Court Motel. Honestly, from the look of the place as I drove up, I’d have happily gone right past it had I not already made a reservation. Fortunately, the look of the exterior gave no hint as to the wonderful restoration of the rooms. There are two sections to the motel, and the only one that has been restored to date is the rear section. My room was immaculate and was beautifully restored to its mid-1940s décor, complete with refinished wood floors and original furniture. I highly recommend the place. Day Seven – Carthage, MO to Catoosa, OK My first photo op of the day was at the Rainbow Curve Bridge in Baxter Springs, KS. This is one of several historic bridges along Route 66 that remains open to traffic. Further down the road in Baxter Springs is the Kansas Route 66 Information Center in an historic Phillips 66 service station. That’s where I had the pleasure to meet Dean “Crazy Legs” Walker who was the inspiration for the Tow Mater character in the movie Cars. He has the rare (at least I think it’s rare) ability to turn his feet around to face backward. He gave me an unsolicited demonstration that was more uncomfortable for me to watch than it was for him to do. He was the attendant at the information center and was quite helpful and fun to be around. There isn’t much of Kansas along Route 66 and I soon found myself in Oklahoma. Some of the travel guides mention the ghost town of Picher that was vacated in the 1970s due to chemical contamination. I made the side trip to Picher and regretted it. There’s nothing to see there but a group of gutted buildings in the middle of nowhere. There are a couple of still-occupied non-residential buildings, but the place held no interest for me and had a very sketchy vibe. Don’t waste your time going there like I did. Miami, OK has the reported last remaining original 9’ section of original pavement on Route 66. It was built in 1922 and decommissioned 1937. I drove on it for about one mile before the road deteriorated to the point where I’d had my share of fun on it. I couldn’t help but stop at the Blue Whale of Catoosa. The story goes that a local gentleman who apparently had a lot of time on his hands built it as a gift to his wife on their wedding anniversary. I hope he got a better thank you from his wife than I would have received from mine had I gifted something like that to her for our anniversary. Day Eight – Catoosa to Tulsa, Final Day on Route 66 I managed to hit five museums that day. The J.M. Davis Museum in Claremore has a bewildering collection of firearms. A must-see for firearms enthusiasts. The Will Rogers Memorial Museum in Claremore is another must-see for anyone interested in the life, wit, and wisdom of this political commentator and satirist. He was a class act in every sense of the word, and we could surely use someone like him today. The Catoosa Historical Museum is a small museum that focuses on local history. The attendant was pleasant and talkative, and it’s worth a stop to learn a little bit about one of the towns that Route 66 runs through. The D.W. Correll museum was my next stop. It houses an extensive collection of minerals and a relatively small collection of cars. My last museum stop was the Tulsa Air and Space Museum and Planetarium. It wasn’t very large, but it had some interesting examples of aircraft. It was another stop worth making. The final landmark I visited on Route 66 before heading to the hotel was the Meadow Gold sign in downtown Tulsa. This marked the end of my Route 66 trek. The following day I hopped on the Interstate highway System and made my way up to Auburn, IN where I attended the Buick gathering on July 2nd and 3rd. I arrived back home on July 4th after 3,300 miles. The trip was a complete success, and I hope to take the Buick on the road again next year to complete the stretch of Route 66 between Tulsa and Santa Monica. My wife will be retired by then, so I hope to have some company next time.
    28 points
  14. Effective Immediately: Non-hobby related political posts, responses, private messages, comments, or emails and social media originating from the forum* will be deleted without comment. Those that make them will be banned for 90 days. Second offenses will get them banned for life. * Moderators and other forum users have reported harassment from other forum participants in personal emails and on their social media accts. Forum Rules
    28 points
  15. Well....it has been about 5 years since the planets were aligned enough for me to get my 1931 DB 2 person coupe back on it's feet and running. Thank you so very much to my friends, Pete Bedia and his friend Sarge for all that they did for me. They brought an extra 1931 DB engine up to me from Los Angeles. While they were here, they helped my replace the master and wheel cylinders, bought me a new battery and got most of the new wire loom hooked up. I still have some wiring to figure out, but they must have done something correct because it actually started up! As soon as I get the rest of the wiring figured out and get the little beast registered, I will be driving it daily again. Yay!
    27 points
  16. Here she is. Unfortunately with the cold gray day, I have to post a photo the seller sent me. I'll try to get it out over the weekend for a few better shots. Winter has been knocking on our door today. Lets hope it passes us by. I would love to drive it once or twice this fall, if for nothing else, than to find the gremlins most old cars have so I can sort them over the winter. She doesn't look like she's had much use in the last 20 years with about 3000 on the odometer according to the owner restorer. I have seen a few and remember seeing one for sale when I was around 16 or 17 in much worse shape for ironically not alot less money and that was 30 years ago. She runs very well. Most chrome is new, Nice top and decent interior. Very good straight body with good paint and since it's been on there a long time I should be good to go. Needs alot of detailing. Looks about as dirty in person, but that's some of the fun. I haven't had a chance to test everything out so I can't give a full report. Should be a fun driver by next summer. Now the question. The Bedford Classic tires are probably 20 years old so they need to go. Correct white walls or Blackwalls? I probably won't go the expense of Radial whites so they would be probably a Bias Firestone white. Had them on my 48 Plymouth conv't and it drove very well without even balancing the wheels. No I'm not going Chrysler Wires Though I do have a full painted set that came off a 54 Dodge sedan in a junkyard back in the 60's.
    27 points
  17. I believe @edinmass said something like "Sometimes the cars just find you when you are staying quiet and not even looking' in another thread. Well, I had the same happen to me. There was a 1920 Cole Aero 8 7 person Tourster powered by a 346.4 cubic inch V8 that I had known about as it was featured in an old Automobile Quarterly and some other places out there. Two months ago, I received a message that it was time for the owner to part ways with it and they wanted it to go to the right home. It had been sitting for 8-10 years since last driven and probably not seen in the public since the 1990's as the owner maybe used it for 300 miles of local drives around his town. I was able to strike the right deal for it, went and picked it up, and then my son and I started working to get it running again. Yesterday we finally woke the big V8 up and we are getting close to getting it back on the road after the some more sorting out. The car is a big impressive machine and the pictures don't really do it justice, but as a bonus I included a link to a short video of the engine running so you can hear the Cole V8. The original cost for the Cole Aero 8 Tourster was $3350 in 1920 and today all Coles 1916 and up are considered CCCA Full Classics.
    27 points
  18. I have long said, only partly in jest, that the three basic food groups are beer, pizza, and ice cream. (My wife says chocolate is a fourth.) Today, having replaced the spark plug on my 1907 one-lung Cadillac and lubricated everything I could reach, I sallied forth in search of a pizza. My favorite pizza joint made me one – to go, of course. But while waiting for it, I noticed they were serving ice cream cones. I hadn’t had one for months, since the lockdown. I took my pizza home, had three slices with a good craft beer, froze the other slices, and drove the Cadillac back to the restaurant. I was served two scoops in a waffle cone, which I ate sitting behind the wheel of the Cadillac on a brilliantly sunny spring day. Trifecta! Then I drove the Cadillac about 15 more miles, including a gravel road through a federal wildlife preserve. The toilets were closed, but the trees weren’t. The hikers and dog-walkers loved the car. And, since the ice cream was mint chocolate chip, my wife’s food group was included, too! Gil Fitzhugh the Elder, Morristown, NJ
    27 points
  19. Thanks for the kind words and support, everyone. It is always appreciated. Rumors of my demise (or the engine's) are greatly exaggerated and today we fired it up again after doing some testing and making some changes. First, there's a new oil pump. There was nothing obviously wrong with the old one, but it's one variable to check off the list. Although I really didn't want to do it, I broke down and pulled a main bearing cap and used some Plasti-Gauge to check clearances. The book says .002-.003 and my mains measured .002" with no signs of oil starvation, so that was a relief. Obviously oil was circulating and there was no damage due to the low pressure. Main bearings were in good shape with no signs of oil starvation. Clearances measured out at .002". The main bearings on this engine are insanely complicated, using insert bearings (good) and a locating ring that was a real pain to deal with. The mains are fed by individual pipes from the main oil manifold and getting that lined up with the hole in the bearing was a bit of a challenge, as well as the locating rings that hold everything in alignment. I guess I'm glad I took it apart to look, but it was even more of a PITA than I imagined it would be. Just measuring one main bearing was about five hours of work given my trial-and-error assembly/disassembly process. That done, I bolted the oil pickup tube and pan back in place with new gaskets, then had the guy next door use his forklift to pull the engine off the lift and put it back on the ground. I pulled the oil cooler tube with my adapters bolted to it and reconfigured everything to just feed the new oil pressure gauge--I didn't bother with the pressure pot this time since I figured everything was well-oiled from all the other times I used it. Looking at the manual and the diagrams others have posted in this thread, I realized that the thing I thought was the regulator is actually the bypass for the oil cooler and the thing I thought was the bypass is actually the regulator. This is good, because the regulator is the one that is accessible from the outside of the engine and the bypass was the thing I couldn't get a wrench on. If pressure gets too high, oil pushes the little piston out of the way and dumps oil back into the pan through the block. Since I removed the regulator piston and spring to connect my gauge, I effectively eliminated any pressure regulation--it should have whatever the max output of the pump actually is. I have not decided whether I will reinstall the spring and plunger or if I'll just leave my bypass in place--more oil pressure is better than less, up to a certain point anyway, and I'm not sure this pump is capable of making more than about 60 PSI anyway. So all that done, I filled the crankcase and the radiator, connected the battery and [very reluctantly] pressed the button. It bellowed to life and sure enough, there's plenty of oil pressure. The book says it should be 45 PSI at start up, and that's what it was showing, going up to 50-55 PSI at about 1500 RPM and down to 5-10 at idle (which the book also says is OK). It's worth noting that the cheap oil pressure gauge on which I was previously relying read about 5 PSI less than the main gauge, suggesting that the gauge wasn't the problem. It was definitely the oil pump, and I'm relieved that it appears to be healthy now. However, it still has a major heat issue. We ran it for five or six minutes and it eventually overheated and boiled over at 220 degrees again, with MASSIVE heat coming off the manifolds. Something is still amiss with the cooling system and/or timing/ignition systems to make it cook itself, but oil pressure is no longer an issue. What a relief. Next step will be to install the engine-driven fan, as suggested by Matt Hinson, and see if it moves enough air to keep things cool. I'm not convinced that the electric fan I'm using is really moving enough air, despite being able to feel a pretty good breeze through the core. I may try the bucket experiment, replacing the radiator with a 50-gallon barrel full of water, and seeing what the water pump's flow looks like in real time. I'm also going to remove the oil cooler in the water pump and reinstall the bypass pipe, since that obviously wasn't the issue. I'm curious to see how it affects oil pressure, if at all. It took everything I had to screw myself together enough to push the button and fire it again. I really wasn't equipped for another failure, despite steeling myself for it for more than a week. Expecting failure is my default state, although I somehow also remain eternally optimistic that things will turn out OK. I'm hugely relieved that things did, indeed, turn out OK this time--even Melanie breathed a big sigh of relief (I'm sure I've been pretty miserable to be around for the past 10 days or so). The cooling issues are probably solvable and the rest is tuning and sorting. Still a long way to go, but one major hurdle has been cleared and I don't believe the engine is hurt. Thanks for all the support, guys, it really means a lot.
    26 points
  20. After being married for 40 years, I took a careful look at my life. I told my wife that forty years ago we lived in a cheap apartment, drove a junk car, slept on a sofa bed, and watched a 16-inch black and white TV. But hey, every night I got to sleep with the hottest 23 year-old girl I knew. Now we live in a $750,000 house, have a collection of antique and classic cars, sleep on a huge bed, and watch a 60-inch wide-screen flat screen TV. But every night I crawl into bed with a 65 year-old woman. I told her that it seems like she's not holding up her end of things. My wife's a very reasonable woman. She replied that I should go out and find a hot 23 year-old girl to sleep with, and once again I will be living in a cheap apartment, driving a junk car, sleeping on a sofa bed, and watching no TV at all. Aren't older women great? They really know how to solve problems! But then she contracted cancer, and the Lord took her away. Suddenly I realized I'd give up the $750,000 house, collection of antique and classic cars, huge bed, and wide screen TV just to have that 65 year-old woman back. Now I realize what had been best for me all along.
    26 points
  21. Obviously time to put the top up!
    26 points
  22. Just picked up this 1930 Pierce Model B Touring about a week ago. I am new to PA’s (and a car as old as this) but I have been contacted by several PAS members (which I have already joined) who are ready,willing and able to offer me any assistance/advice that I may need. I wish to thank you all in advance (Ed M.) When it hit the internet about a week or so ago it certainly stirred up a lot of interest. I look forward to owning this car
    25 points
  23. With all the current stress going on in the USA and the world concerning health issues, I thought perhaps it would possibly be good to share some period photos of vehicles that we all love. The old cars and trucks make us happy. So for a few moments viewing what I have posted here may relieve you from some of the stress now upon all of us. I hope the images, even briefly, take away that cloud of worry and concern. We are not only thinking about ourselves, and family but dear friends across the world who are like family because of our common interest in older cars. If you can add to this with your images, please do. I sincerely wish all of you well , and hope in some way this makes all of you feel a little bit better. Walt on Long Island.
    25 points
  24. What an expensive way to ruin the look of your car.
    25 points
  25. she can outrun ol Papa 🎶The wheels on the bus go round and round🎶 “This, this is the one I want”
    25 points
  26. A well known restoration shop has rebuilt this corner service station in their town, very nice. If you're ever through White Post Virginia take a look!
    25 points
  27. "deep sigh....." How come, on every forum, when a member decides the rules need to be altered to suit his private needs (when they are usually clearly defined at registration) the Moderators are painted as some type of Draconian jack-booted tyrants for enforcing those agreed upon regulations? Then they sign off with a final insult post and an "I'm going home and taking my ball with me!" attitude. I have been a car forum Moderator. I recognize the time involved, the balance needed to juggle varied personalities and it's all volunteer work. I have seen forums cave in to others needs for slacker rules and some of those forums have degenerated to pretty unfriendly places where belittling and swearing at one another take precedence over actual car sharing information. When I choose not visit that type of forum any longer, I just leave. Quietly. Without a public decree. Maybe all of us remaining members can take a breath and realize just how informative and friendly this board is. I do. And it's exactly what keeps me coming back. Greg
    25 points
  28. Dear friends, Yesterday I submitted my request to Steve Moskowitz and Peter Gariepy to remove my status of BCA Forum Moderator and thanked them for the privilege of doing it for the last ten or so years. I have not received a reply, but feel it important to go ahead and announce it so that a new moderator can be selected/appointed. For a couple of years now I have not spent much time with my cars and tried to make up for that by starting the My Buick Sales and Service garage thread but now I'm not even able to spend time with that. I think it is important that a moderator be more into the subject for which they moderate than I currently am. Additionally my wife and I plan to start traveling a good bit in our newly acquired Airstream and will at times be boondocking off grid where there might not be internet service for several days at a time, therefore creating days of dead space in regards to effectively moderating the forum. Sadly there are other circumstances going on behind the scenes here that also helped with my decision but I will spare you those explanations here. Do know though that it has nothing to do with the current club political controversy, I never back down from a fight. I want to thank every one of you for your support over the last 10 or so years. I have worked to try and build the forum with interesting thread subjects, subforums etc in an effort to maintain interest and keep the forum alive and dynamic. I have tried my damnedest to be as honest, upfront and fair with any editing or removing of posts that I thought improper or hurtful to persons or the forum as a whole. No doubt I got some wrong and I am sorry if so. But God, hasn't it been fun!!!! Watching the builds of cars from rusty shells and of garages from cut up power poles and scrap steel. Following road warriors on their annual trips cross country to Buick meets and the fun and camaraderie they had when there. Hearing happy stories of new Buick purchases and sad ones of when they were lost in a wreck. Believe me when you peruse these accounts and posts thoroughly EVERYDAY, they and the people behind them become a part of your life. And a part I would never want to forget. Not sure how the process of bringing in a new moderator will go but I know there are some good prospects out there, very qualified folks who will be up to the challenge. So anyhow, tha's it my friends. Love ya all, every effin one a ya. Buickly, MrEarl cc @Steve Moskowitz @Peter Gariepy
    25 points
  29. Discussions of BCA Club Business/Politics Folks, we have come to a 3 pronged fork in the ol’ Buick Highway in relation to the discussion of BCA Club Business and Politics. One would have had to have been hiding under a rock if they are not aware of the disruption and disturbance that a recent thread brought to our generally peaceful and friendly forum. I have always tried to allow discussions to ebb and flow unchallenged and unimpeded but feel that I may have been negligent in intervening in a few in the past. I would first like to say that contrary to some of yall’s perceptions that I have been biased and one-sided in my efforts to moderate some threads, I ask that you please believe me when I say I have tried my best not to be and to please put aside those perceptions and allow me the opportunity to try and move us out of the ugly quagmire that we are in. Back to the forks in the Buick Highway. The fork on the left is the fork we seem to be headed toward. It is full of potholes and dead man curves filled with more fomenting, stir the pot posts, back and forth bickering, hurt feelings, lost friendships and lost members. The center fork is one of a positive environment, civility, continued old friendships, helping one another with their cars and the making of new friends and very importantly, new members. It is a multi-lane road that all drivers, pre-war, post-war, modifieds, performance, Riviera’s, Reatta’s, and Opels can drive down at their own speed. It looks to be nicely paved with beautiful scenery, rolling hills and gentle curves. The fork on the right is one that I don’t think anyone would want to be forced down. It is filled with total censorship of any Club Business/Politics discussion and would involve potential loss of communication and informative discussions that are vital to our Clubs health and growth, and ends with us falling into a giant sink hole. SO folks, I have chosen to take the center fork and I hope you will all join me as we head down it. But take notice, I see quite a few regulatory signs down that peaceful roadway we will have to abide by if we are going to enjoy the ride. Those signs include No Nonfactual or Knowingly False or Inaccurate Comments, No Speculative or Conjectural Discussions aimed at stirring the pot, No Tempestuous Arguments, No Political Grandstanding (save it for the Bugle BOD candidate issue), No Personal Attacks, No Defamatory or Slanderous Assertions, No Provoking/Abusive Language, No Threatening, Harassing or Hateful comments. And be aware, enforcement will be stricter and those unwilling to comply with those posted signs or those who post discussions that a moderator considers as to having disturbed the order, dignity and harmony of this forum may find those posts removed and themselves left behind and standing on the side of the road. Nothing really new here, just some clarification of what you agreed to when you signed up here that I hope will make more clear the guidelines I will be using to keep the Buick Highway a more friendlier and peaceful highway. Drive safely my friends.
    25 points
  30. I have been very reluctant to share anything about this accursed car given how badly it has gone in the past. Some of you surely remember those threads and may also be thinking, "Oh, God, not this nonsense again," and that's totally fair. My ownership of this car has been nothing if not tumultuous and this will be the third thread in which I've attempted to share some of the work I'm doing on it. Is it a mistake? Maybe. People seemed to like to take pleasure in taking pot-shots at my misery and given that my skin was worn pretty thin by the whole thing, I did not react with kindness. Jerks beget jerks, and all that. Nevertheless, my motivations remain sincere: One, I won't forget my friend AJ saying that even threads full of failure are useful because they show others that even people with significant resources can experience setbacks and frustrations (or perhaps showing that the purpose of my life is only to serve as a warning to others). Two, as I mentioned to someone just today, project threads like these are an excellent source of real, hands-on information and problem-solving that isn't always available in other areas unless someone specifically asks about that very thing. And three, I really do enjoy writing about working on cars and find it therapeutic--the promise of sharing what I've done often gets me out in the shop to do things that I can share, and I suppose that's good for my sanity. So, to bring everyone up to speed, I bought this 1935 Lincoln K almost two years ago and it has been a never-ending source of misery ever since. Some of it was related to the fact that expectations were not properly managed (I did not set out to buy a project car, I set out to buy a new tour car that just needed some tires), and some of it was related to the fact that the "project" part turned out to be a far more significant job than anyone expected. In short, every time I fixed something on the car, the thing next to it broke, up to and including a hole in the side of the block that was a total surprise to everyone except perhaps the guy who smeared JB Weld over it to hide it. It totally broke me. I gave up. Ultimately, I pushed it into a corner of the shop, covered it up, and walked away planning never to look at it again. Whomever moved into our building at some distant point in the future after we're gone would get a 4800-pound bonus. That was my plan. When I told Melanie I was going to crush it instead, she was OK with that idea. But I should also mention that she wisely pointed out that the money is still gone and the car is still here. Crushing it might bring a perverse kind of satisfaction, but it would be momentary. It wouldn't fix my crippled enjoyment of the hobby and the opportunity that the car represents would be lost. She didn't care, do whatever you want, but it started to sink in that maybe I could turn my hate and resentment into something positive. I decided that I would beat the car by fixing it. Or at least that's what I'm currently telling myself. To sum up: bought this car expecting it to be "just a set of tires away from being ready to tour," car crapped itself with a hole in the block, eventually got the hole fixed but since that involved removing the engine and disassembling most of it, the car is now in pieces. My constant disappointment and frustration with the car has caused me a great deal of pain and stress. Nevertheless, I have decided to fix it, if only to prove that I'm crazy but not stupid. Tasks that have been done so far: All-new fuel system, including fresh gas tank, lines, electric and mechanical fuel pumps, and rebuilt carburetor All-new starting system, including batteries, cables, and starter motor Repairing and repainting the headlight buckets, which had been damaged multiple times in the past and were about 30% bondo at this point New plugs, wires, coils, and install factory wire conduits Clean out cooling system, install new hoses with restrictors to fight overflowing radiator cap, install aftermarket temperature gauge in glove box Re-pack water pump New fluids throughout Rehab power brake booster system Tuning. Lots and lots of tuning. Eventually got it to start instantly just by reaching in the window and touching the button. Hope I can duplicate it. Install fog lamps And after all that, we still had a hole in the block so next steps: Remove front-end sheetmetal, sidemounts, and lights Remove radiator, steering column, steering box Re-core radiator Rebuild all accessories (water pump, generator, starter, clutch, etc.) Remove engine, which was a pretty big job, seeing as it was installed at the factory before the body was in place Build crate and stand for engine to be delivered to New England where the block would be stitched Remove 58 rusty head studs. Successfully remove a few of them. Break the rest. Spend seven months slowly drilling them out. Build a custom engine stand to hold the giant V12 Most of the car sits in a corner of our shop under a cover. Parts of it are scattered throughout the building and with various subcontractors. The engine is on a stand being rehabilitated--since we did not need to fully disassemble it to repair the hole in the block, I'm hoping that the rotating assembly is OK. It has .030 oversize pistons in it already, so it has been rebuilt at some point in the past. Engine builders Frank Seme and Dale Adams both told me that rebuilding a Lincoln K V12 is a $30,000 job, so we've worked hard to keep the bottom end intact. I am still optimistic that it can be rehabilitated and will run and drive properly when I'm finished. If not, that will be a very, very bad day. Hope is indeed a dangerous thing. Anyway, I'll document my work from here. If you have questions about things I've done already, send me a private message and I'll fill you in. There's a lot of information related to this project that I've accumulated, so I'm happy to help in that regard. And if you're one of the guys who likes to gloat when a dealer gets burned, well, do that in a PM, too. That more or less brings us up to date. A lot of the work I listed up above is going to have to be re-done, so I'll do it again. And as long as the engine is out and it's all in pieces, I may as well restore it to show standards. So that's what I plan to do. Let's get started...
    24 points
  31. Recently, an entire thread on the American Underslung was deleted. It was an accident and I just learned it was my fault. No one else's. I banned a member for just cause but was not aware that by doing so it would take down the entire thread. I simply did not realize he started the thread. I am horrified that not only I did this that others were blamed for my mistake. I have discussed this with Peter and will make sure that nothing like this happens again. We got a very lengthy apology from the person I banned. it was heartfelt and based upon the stress in his life at the time it is more understandable. Still no excuse but a reason. We will be reinstating him. To all those who were affected by my actions I can only apologize. I certainly had no intention whatsoever of deleting a great thread.
    24 points
  32. My Curved Dash Olds, on a day I did NOT go touring; my 1912 Buick on a tour in Delaware a few years ago; my 1911 Stanley, steaming up at daybreak on last year's HCCA one-and two-cylinder tour.
    24 points
  33. Wife and I can relate to this. Yesterday was my 6 week check up to see if last bladder cancer treatment was successful and we wouldn't have been out at all if not for this important test. Just 2 miles into trip at 10 AM we stopped at a traffic light and were rear ended by some "high" idiot who was taken away in cuffs for DUI all the while screaming obscenities at wife and I as well as the police officers! Very proud of how well our 2018 Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV endured the full speed crash as witness's claimed he never even touched the brakes. Rough start to our day but cancer free declaration later at Doctor's helped us endure it. Howard Dennis
    24 points
  34. Well, after 21 years with the same company helping to recruit and hire healthcare professionals, I've officially RETIRED! Of course I've done it before when I retired after 23 years in the U.S. Navy, but this time I'm not wondering what my second career will be- it's already happened, and it certainly was enjoyable and so satisfying. To think the people we hired made such a difference in peoples lives is awesome. Proud also of the projects I initiated to hire our veterans. Those talented hospital corpsmen and medics can do so much more than what is normally allowed in the civilian world, and now we're successfully breaking down barriers for them and putting their experience and skills to work in the right place. Friday was officially my last day at work, although I'll go back later this week for my retirement luncheon and to pick up a few things still in the office. I woke up this morning without an alarm clock, didn't have to fight traffic, and spent the day leisurely sorting and packing for Hershey. Best part of this is I won't need to work by axx off so I can go, ain't worried about what's going on while I'm gone, and won't have to unscramble some crisis when I get back. Sweeeeeeettttttt! So-if I walk by at Hershey with a kinda frozen smile on my face just figure I'm having a really great time! Terry
    24 points
  35. 23 points
  36. After searching for 5 years and many post in the Want Section here on the forum, the missing passenger side door molding for my '69 Impala SS project has been located ! A friend of mine in South Jersey was able to locate the NOS molding from a acquisition this week of vintage parts ~ Thanks Donny ! Steve
    23 points
  37. Tonight I feel compelled to tell any new person, thinking about getting into old cars is...The hobby can be so unbelievably satisfying. If you are lucky, you might find an old clunker that is in need of care and attention. If you want a great hobby, if you can do all the work yourself, it can be so incredibly rewarding. It does not have to be expensive. You don't have to know how to do all the work yourself. You might just have the desire to want to do all the work yourself. Where there is a will, there is a way. I did this very thing. I picked up an old 4-door sedan with great curves. It ran, but barely. Drivable? Not more than 25 feet. I brought it home and nursed it back to life. I read, and read some more. I researched for countless hours. The new knowledge stimulated me. I joined forums like this one. I got grease well past my elbows all winter long. I pushed myself to do things I had never attempted before. Like rebuild a tranny. Pull out a diff. Rewire an old car. Rebuild the carb. And so much more. It was't hard to convince myself to try these new tasks, as every step along the way was so rewarding. Addicting. Tonight, a summer evening cruise had me grinning from ear to ear in the old Plymouth. People were going out of their way to wave at me. Kids and adults on 4th floor apartment balconies gesturing at me to honk my horn. They jumped up and down with glee as I gave them a good couple of aah-ooh-gaahs. It's just so very rewarding. There is no car like my '38 on the roads around here. I built a driver. And drive it I do. At any chance I get. To quote someone on this forum who said, It's a little, old, "cartoonish, mutt-of-a-car" that has become endeared to me. If you are as fortunate as I am, you too will feel giddy, as when you were a kid while out cruising in a car that you saved. A car you gave a renewed life to. The joy that it brings to other people is a real bonus. My brain must be foggy from all the fun I've had, for I have little desire for a newer car. I'm far from done with my '38, it just keeps getting better and better after every little job I complete. I will continue improving my car. This car went from down-right scary, to a very satisfying summer cruiser. She's no prize winner, but she sure won me over. If you can...Do it! Dive in.
    23 points
  38. I have been considering this for some time; the cost of the hobby from an investment perspective. In my old, pre knee replacement, life I was a marathon runner. I did most of the big ones including Boston twice (the Pebble Beach of the running world). While running in its purest form is very inexpensive, basically you need shorts, socks, a T-shirt and a pair of running shoes, when you get into marathons the costs pile up fast. This is particularly true if you decide to be a 50 stater (running a marathon in all 50 states) or even more so, if you want all 6 of the majors (New York, Boston, Chicago, London, Berlin and Tokyo) or the 7 continents. So what's my point? Never in 40 years and 50,000 miles of running did I ever hear of a runner complaining about cost. Never. Nor did I ever hear of a runner holding any expectation of getting a return on their investment. Instead they simply enjoyed their experience. That is what I hope to impart to our hobby for the upcoming year. Lets enjoy the cars, the drive, the shows, the publications, this website and most importantly, the people of the hobby. The cost? In my humble opinion, it's worth it. Happy New Year 2020 website friends. Eric Macleod
    23 points
  39. I'd like to just take a moment, and thank the AACA (and the moderators!) for providing this great forum, and to all the Forum members who share their thoughts and knowledge. It's a lot of fun, both entertaining and educational, and we should all be very thankful it exists. I've really enjoyed it, as it helps me stay in touch with people now that I'm retired. You read a lot of articles about having enough money for retirement, but rarely is mentioned the fact that when you leave a business or profession, you also leave behind a lot of contacts and "business friends". So why this sudden outpouring of thanks? Why, it's my 7000th post on the forum, and I wanted it to be a little bit special! Thanks to all .............David Coco Winchester Va.
    23 points
  40. Early this morning, I received a text from a forum member and twenty five year friend from the CCCA and Pierce Arrow Society. It was a quick note of a obscure car he has known of for years, coming up for sale. I texted him back for more details........although I wasn’t too intrested. I have learned over the years, cars find me when I am not looking, and usually not intrested in them. Suffering car withdrawal from shows and tours, and I haven’t been on a “car adventure road trip” for well over a year for myself, I decided to sniff out the car just a bit. I did ten minutes research, and inquired about the car with him on a follow up phone call. My interest was peaked a bit more..........not too much. A few hours go by, and a few old poorly done photos show up on my phone via text message. A little more research, and I realized this car was really interesting, and a “sleeper” for what era it is. So, I made an offer through the friend for the car sight unseen...............and waited for an answer. It took a few hours, and the call came back. “You just bought yourself a car”.............so, the point of this thread will be the adventure of going to get a car I have never seen, on a platform that I have never seen at any show.............and the is how this “new old car” journey starts. I will “blog” the entire process here just for fun, and to share it with the members. As far as I can determine, there are only three of these chassis/platforms that survive. NO GUESSING or asking what it is.......please don’t ask. I will say, it’s pre World War One, and was 4700-5300 dollars new from the factory. All of this happened today between 8am and 3pm. More to come..........
    22 points
  41. FINAL REGULAR POST UPDATE: Everything in life must come to an end, and it’s time to put this thread to its logical conclusion. While the car still needs a bit of sorting and finishing...........today I will align the front end.......it’s time to end the regular updates. I will install a new set of tires in a few weeks, and do countless other small items. I spent the last four days driving the White as my “everyday car”. It’s been staying outside overnight in my driveway at my house.....the rain and heat finally stopped in Southern Florida. I used the car for going to work, out to eat, the grocery store as well as the hardware store. Took the wife and dogs for a three hour ride in it along the water on Thanksgiving day. Since the first time I started it, it has never failed to proceed or break down. Every single time I set out in it from day one, it’s made it back to the garage without complaint. Rather amazing if you ask me. It’s entirely reliable, starts instantly hot or cold...........the strangest sensation even for me.........a car this early and new to the road is simply a 100 percent reliable car. The car has been a pure joy to learn about, recommission, and drive. I don’t think I have ever worked on a project that was as much fun as this one. I have made fifty new friends during this adventure.........which is even better than owning the car. I will come back and post occasional updates........but the best update will be looking for the car in the publications as I intend to drive it that much in the next few years. The car will now make its way north as soon as it’s finished. The White was one of the few bright spots in my life during the pandemic..........so much sadness and heartbreak on a daily basis.....it was fantastic therapy for me........and from the comments I have received, for many others as well. I would like to thank everyone who has helped, commented, shared information, and contacted me during this “Great White Adventure” the car has become something much different than I anticipated..........and every single part of the journey has been fun. My best to all...........and I hope to see you at a show or on a tour.....with a bit of luck, I will be driving the White or displaying it at the event. We still have another six months of challenging times ahead of us before we get back to “normal”...........if anyone dares to think any of us ever fit the definition of the word!
    22 points
  42. 22 points
  43. Our Tidewater Region has long been blessed with strong leadership, often bred thorough a military background. Congratulations are in order to another one of our members currently immersed in their military careers. I'm proud to let everyone know that our AACA Region newsletter co-editor (The Mudflap) Ken Packard was recently selected to a Submarine Command position. He is following in the footsteps of another of our Tidewater Region leaders (and past president) Ivan Joslin (Captain, USN, Retired) who commanded one of the last Diesel powered submarines on active service. We're proud of our military veterans and active duty members in all branches of the service represented in this area who have made our club strong and thriving. Terry
    22 points
  44. Sadly, this is simply another manifestation of Americans' obsession with cheapness, always confusing a low price with a good value. It is probably the single biggest problem facing us as a society, and it is sending us down a spiral from which we may not recover. When I tell a guy it'll cost him $1800 to move the car from my shop to his home in California, he loses his mind, calls me a crook, finds a broker on the internet who will do it for $600 on an open transporter in the middle of February, and then calls me to say, "Do you always send your cars out looking like this? It's going to cost me $1500 just to get it clean again!" Americans, sadly, just aren't able to understand that you get what you pay for. They just want to pay less... for everything. Clothes, cars, taxes, transportation, whatever. And then they wonder why everything around them is shit.
    22 points
  45. Having spent the last several years disassembling my father’s shop, and remembering him working in his as a child, I can’t tell you how many times I wish I could still walk into his on a daily basis. I long to see him working on a car, old school country music in the background, the smell of grease, a friend helping him, and all the tools in an orderly fashion, around the shop. (Ok, maybe a few swear words, or loud yelling, here and there, as he wrestled with an uncooperative part also). When I went to his garage five years ago, it was a mess. Evidence of his struggles for the last many years, as he was always meticulous in his care for all his possessions, but most especially his tools and his shop. The chaos I found was beyond my comprehension. It saddened me that I hadn’t known what he was going through for so many years, and he lived so far away. I saw his struggles in everything in his shop. I can’t explain it, but that’s when everything he was dealing with really hit me. It was so obvious to me. I guess I'm posting this here because I think you would understand. Don’t get me wrong, I’m very happy that my father is no longer suffering, but a huge part of me is lost without him. I will never see him again. I will never see him working on a car or lovingly detailing one. So many years passed between the time I moved away and when I went to help him, but suddenly, when I went to Texas, I was his little girl again. My father and his cars were one in the same. I’m sure many of you are like that also. Don’t ever underestimate what that means to the children you raised. It’s an indelible memory to picture your father in his shop. If you have children, grown or otherwise, please spend time in your shop with them. It is very likely that they will cling to those memories when you are gone.
    22 points
  46. Please allow an old man to brag a bit. After 37 years of restoring professionally the business was turned over to my 35 year old Son Devon two years ago. I still come in every day and do a bit of upholstery and woodwork but for the most part I just get in the way. At last week's Hershey we showed a 1960 Eldorado Biarritz which was the first full restoration run completely by my Son from start to finish. Happily it was well received and garnered a First Junior Award. I can now rest easy knowing the business is in good hands
    22 points
×
×
  • Create New...