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Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/15/2021 in Posts

  1. Well, that because you probably don't buy stud finders from Harbor Freight like I do. For some reason I can't stand spending $50 for a tool that works when I can spend $25 for one that doesn't work. 🙄
    14 points
  2. My father has been gone now just over 20 years ( 2-3-31 to 12-25-00 ). He was a huge influence in my life when it came to playing sports and motor vehicles. As a young kid, it was my job to hold the drop light as he went along and did a tune-up on the family sedan, he would explain everything to me as he went along. When my parents went to the local Chevrolet Dealership back in the fall of 1969, they took me along and I remember to this day my Mom picking out the Dover White Impala Sport Sedan ! He probably didn't realized it, but he "planted the seed" into a four year old to where I am today
    13 points
  3. If you're at all worried, spend the money you'd spend on the inspector on a plane ticket instead. It's the only way to be sure. There are two kinds of inspection companies. The first is the kind that hires amateurs and part-timers to look at cars and they don't really know what they're doing, so they just fill out the form that the inspection company gives them. They take a few extreme close-up photos of every flaw in the paint. Maybe they listen to it run and/or take a ride with someone else driving. Not much better than no inspection at all except you get some guy's uninformed op
    13 points
  4. OK, to reel things in a bit. One, yes, of course we have a purchase agreement that says "as-is, where-is" and that there are no guarantees or warranties. Case law concerning used cars is pretty well established. Nevertheless, there's a pretty wide gray area in which we actually do business. I'm not the sort that just points to the contract and tells people, "Too bad." This is a hobby, it's supposed to be fun, not stressful, and I look at it as my job to facilitate that. Two, there's absolutely a limit to my goodwill and you can use it up before you even finish the purch
    13 points
  5. I learned with great dismay that my long-time friend and restorer Dale Adams passed away over the weekend. He was a massive talent who brought us some extraordinary automobiles and whose talents were largely unmatched in the restoration world. His was a brilliant mind that also brought us the "Bone" creeper and delivered cars that were not only gorgeous, but which typically run and drive even better than new. His custom creations were spectacular in their imagination and craftsmanship and his only real flaw was knowing that he was probably better than the guys who did it originally. If you nee
    12 points
  6. I've posted this before but you did ask. My father was a Ford man as was his father. One of my first car related memories was sitting on the fender of my Mom's daily driver '30 Model A watching my Dad change the plugs. He bought a series of new Fords, 52, 55, and 60, all basic 2 door sedans with V-8s and automatic, he was a wholesale sales rep for a food service company and put a lot of miles on. In 1964 the 55 was my Mom's car and needed an engine overhaul so my Dad did it himself. In our gravel driveway. With the car on a bumper jack and some wood blocks. I held the light and passed the tool
    12 points
  7. Hey man, he gets a new car, she does a little shopping. Sounds fair to me. 🤷‍♀️
    11 points
  8. Thanks to you all for the input. I really appreciate it. Thanks to you Matt for taking the time to give such a detailed answer. I do believe that I will take the trip to see it in person. I have been looking a long time to find one of these that wasn't chopped and customized. My wife gave me the green light, and it would not be good to have problems dropped off at my door. A few days out of the PA winter doesn't sound bad at any rate.
    11 points
  9. My Dad also got me interested in prewar cars. That 30 Model A was our driver in the early 50s, left by the side road with the keys in it. We finally sold it to a local farmer who cut the body off and made into a flatbed, it was replaced with a 48 Ford Deluxe coupe. Dad always wanted an old hobby car but could never afford it, he loved Packards. He took me to many Classic car shows, a few at Lake Forest, IL, where I learned about the real Classics. It took me many years to do but I finally owned some of these cars in the last 10 years. Again, thanks Dad!
    11 points
  10. My dad started in the 50s with Auburns and went on to have lots of big Classics. I’ve pretty much followed in lock step except I appreciate more esoteric stuff and he always went flashy.
    11 points
  11. Another interesting day with the “Great White”. I was supposed to get the new tires Friday so I can spend the entire weekend putting all six on the car without overdoing it on any one particular day. Since every delivery service is behind by days or weeks the tires didn't arrive until 11 AM this morning. Feeling ambitious I decided to put all six on. I’m getting too old for this. There are multiple rings, snap rings 27 inch Firestone rims. Tires are 37 x 5. I started at noon and finished at 5 o’clock. And I took two or three 30 minute brakes. I was able to remove the tire off the car, and R&am
    10 points
  12. Still working on the Electra but found a car I had to have. 85,000 mile Southern car in excellent shape. 1980 Coupe De Ville. it’s still a GM just not a Buick.
    10 points
  13. I find the 18 volt cordless hammer my go-to tool and it was 20% off with the Harbor Freight ‘cupin’ ... !!
    10 points
  14. 9 points
  15. I could go on and on about my old man. I didn't know he could swear until I was about 25 and playing hockey with him. Sitting in the lockerroom I went in to shock. I think I was 35 before I did the opposite of something he told me to do. Before that I was too scared to. He is 95 now, and played hockey until he was 89 and his knees went. This is a picture from about 10 years ago, going to hockey in his 1984 wagon (He loved those things). Parked in the handicapped spot.
    9 points
  16. We have been in the hobby for around 40 years, some of the cars are his, some are mine and some are ours. He is 83 and always has a project on the go, it keeps him young.
    9 points
  17. 9 points
  18. Wow, i can really see the luminescence in the green here.
    8 points
  19. Next was installing the posts, running the 2x6 rail and baseboard and running the roofing felt then the framing for the wainscoting tin. Installed a 1" steel bar between two 2x6 wall studs then attached a cable for use in attaching a winch for pulling inop vehicles in. Finally time for the rest of the roofing felt and corrugated tin Starting to come together and look like something now...
    8 points
  20. I just got the silicon bronze castings for the new water pump impeller. Ed wanted one and a spare, plus two for other Whites in museums. The "lost wax" investment casting using the 3D printed patterns in PLA plastic worked well. All the details got preserved, even sharp edges. One casting has a flaw in the base that might be mostly removed during machining, but the others are great. There is a little plaster coating here and there from the investment, but it washes off with hot water and stiff brush. Of course, in bronze, the finished impellers will weight three times what the original a
    8 points
  21. UPDATE: Well, it’s been two weeks since we had a meaningful posting. We continue to work on the car. It keeps offering up unexpected challenges, and we keep hitting them out of the park. I put about forty miles on it today. Never misses a beat. Incredibly this car has never stalled, stopped, or failed to proceed since we first fired it up. Testament to Phil’s hard work, and the great construction of the White Motor Car Company. I consider it more reliable than my Ford Focus. Tires will be here Tuesday. Went with the correct factory size of 37 X 5 Goodrich black walls. They were the
    8 points
  22. My Dad and Mom tolerated their son's interest in "old" cars . My Dad told me of the 1930,1931, and 1937 Lincolns my grandfather bought new before the great depression wiped out his finances . When I was 10 , I saw a movie and fell in love with cars in the 1920-30 era. Then the tv show The Untouchables was on too - so the cars on there were of great interest. I told my folks I wanted an old car , their reply was save up for one - so my weekly allowance , all birthday and holiday money I saved for one. At age 13 I saw a Ford model A sedan for sale in my uncles newspaper he got at work. It was fo
    8 points
  23. There's the first two teeth... I'm not a relaxed person under any circumstances and to me, this is very intense work...they look good. I'm worried that they may now be a few thousandths too deep but I tend to find things to worry about. The fact is, the worst that could cause is a tiny amount of additional backlash which won't effect their operation at all...but I may be exaggerating that...there is just as good a chance they are spot on.
    8 points
  24. In about 1956 when I was 2 or 3 years old, I fell and cut my hand badly, severing tendons. Doctors told my parents that I needed home therapy with grasping round things, like a trapeze bar, etc. So they hung a trapeze bar for me, but I quickly got bored, and didn't stay with it without being forced. So my dad had an idea, and got together with family friends to build me a little gas engine-powered car out of lawnmower pieces, so I would WANT to ride it, grasping that steering wheel. Eventually I was invited to drive it in a St Patrick's Day antique car parade in Middletown, Ohio in 1957.
    8 points
  25. I celebrated a birthday today! It’s nice when you and your cars are the same model year!
    8 points
  26. The one I have works just fine as well. My only problem with it is if I get too close to it, it will just beep like crazy so I have to use it at arm's length.
    8 points
  27. What an expensive way to ruin the look of your car.
    8 points
  28. From the Harold Coker collection. Was a Christmas present to Harold's wife, Lillian Coker. Come back in time, it was built in the Columbus Buggy factory, Columbus Ohio. It cost $1500 when the average family income was about $500 a year. It was built in June 1903, six months before the Wright Brothers flew (December 1903). It was powered by 42 2volt batteries producing 84v. It was terrifyingly fast in an age where usual transportation was about 5 miles and hour, it could easily hit TWENTY miles per hour and cover 75 miles before an overnight charge. It was for wealthy women. It was s
    7 points
  29. Hot on the left, cold on the right and you know what flows down hill, what's hard about that. But electrical... I can't even remember, is DC from a battery or is that AC. Now carpentry, I love, period ! Thanks for that kind thought Willie. Actually though Willie, I think that the work of washing and moving all the lumber multiple times after the white crystal powder started appearing was somewhat what started my back problems. I was pissed and tense all the time I was doing it. Dealing with the Nisus company had been no joy, they would not admit it was a problem with
    7 points
  30. How about a Field and Hedgerow Find. My 1925 White model 15 truck. Runs and drives, Original solid rubber tires. Dandy Dave.
    7 points
  31. My new Florida car buddies all buy this modern plastic, carbon fiber, sports cars. They ride like manure, are loud, uncomfortable to ride in, and difficult to get in and out of. Just like pre war cars! They also get poor mileage and are more expensive than they should be. So things really haven’t changed that much in the car hobby. They are just a bit faster than what I usually drive. We had both of them up to the speed limit.......😇 and I can say, the AMG was my preferred drive. The Lambo is a 2020 special edition, as was the 2019 AMG. Next Saturday we will road test the new BMW I8 and a McLa
    7 points
  32. 7 points
  33. Very beautifully styled coupe...but in today's climate you'd best be careful when telling people you admire dictators from the 1930's. 😉
    7 points
  34. My father was a big fan of many American made cars. Having grown up in Dearborn Heights, His first car was a ‘50 Ford when he was 14. He had hundreds of cars in his lifetime. Often buying rust free, mint cars in the south and hauling them back to NE on his empty flatbed. He’d then sell them when the right buyer came along. The biggest influence he had on me for cars was to buy American and a very fond love of his ‘58 Corvette, as well as classic cars in general. I do own a Tundra now and chuckle a little that it hauled so many of his American cars to Oregon. Although, it was assemble
    7 points
  35. So after looking at pics of a lot of other cars with kits, I’m thinking mine doesn’t look nearly as bad. 👍
    7 points
  36. In 1973 when I was not quite seven years old, my father taught me how to turn things on a South Bend lathe. We made a new set of mower deck wheel axles out of a couple of bolts. It took me ten tries to get the first one done. Three more for the other side. My reward??? Since I fixed the sit down lawn mower, I was now allowed to drive the tractor and cut the grass. He was a sharp guy for an eighth grade education...........I learned to use machine tools, and he no longer had to cut grass. I fell for it hook, line, and sinker.
    7 points
  37. 7 points
  38. If I posted who complained to me, you would be stunned.(Well known here.) It rolled off my back and I didn’t let it bother me. There was one loud complaint and there or four other comments. Some people have no joy in their life.......others just like to pull people down. Doesn’t matter. In the end, I like the car.........and still enjoy it. Interestingly, I have as much fun servicing it as driving it. After forty years of fixing things........there are very few automobiles that I still enjoy working on all the time.The White has been nothing but a joy. To be honest, I can live without spinning
    7 points
  39. 4/5s of the family in 1968.
    7 points
  40. TOOLS AND HOW TO USE THEM SKILLSAW: A portable cutting tool used to make boards too short. BELT SANDER: An electric sanding tool commonly used to convert minor touch-up jobs into major refinishing jobs. WIRE WHEEL: Cleans paint off bolts and then throws them somewhere under the workbench with the speed of light. Also removes fingerpr
    7 points
  41. Electric can openers aren't totally useless if you have cats. Just start the can opener and the sound will have every cat in the house right at your feet meowing like crazy in seconds.
    7 points
  42. When they built our Harbor Freight store they put eight handicap parking spaces right across from the door. I guess they were expecting return customers.
    7 points
  43. It's a scam. If they asked for Western Union or some other marginal money-moving service, it's always a scam. Pretending to not know how to internet or take pictures = scam. Refund guarantee = scam. He doesn't have what you need. Don't let your desire for the parts overrule your better judgement. Tell him to send the parts UPS COD and see what happens.
    7 points
  44. My dad was not a car guy. While he always had a newer car, and many station wagons, he did not like working on them. When I was 17, I brought home a Model A Ford that I was excited to start restoring. That day, when he came home from work and found the car, he walked over to me and gently said "Get it the hell out of the yard'! It was just a piece of junk, and he was afraid that I'd waste a lot of time and money and end up with nothing. He did change his tune when 10 years later, he slid behind the wheel for his first drive. It brought back memories of his childhood when his father had a '28
    7 points
  45. Bob , I was looking at the photo you shared and particularly the headlamps ( wow oh wow) on the car and wondering why you were thanking me! then read the page 270. Heck, we aren't even a year old with this thread yet! It proves to me, as I have stated before, that viewers really like pre WW II era vehicles. All total , perhaps I have contributed , maybe 30 photographs, it is all of you - from the USA, Canada, and Europe and Australia and everywhere else that have made this thread what it is. My thanks to all of you as well as the patient volunteers who keep this all together. It's
    7 points
  46. Besides the neighbors kid?
    7 points
  47. I agree. And time for somebody to start companies that will compete with a long list of internet and social media platforms (and us to start patronizing them in a big way.)
    6 points
  48. I bought it. Seller sent me a second chance offer for less than my high bid. Talked extensively with him this evening, and he has a fairly substantial hoard of cars...and this one is in the way eating storage space.
    6 points
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