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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/03/2021 in Posts

  1. Never meant to break any record. Just trying to share information and learn as I go. Thanks.
    9 points
  2. Thanks! It has been a learning process but a lot of fun. I'm now working inside with LED lighting above and a 7000 lumen LED work light 3' from the car. This makes it so much easier. Making sure I sand in one direction and then rotate 90 degrees with the next grit is key. With this better lighting I can easily if I haven't gotten the previous grit's scratch marks covered. I finished the rest of the tub and will start on the interior tomorrow!
    5 points
  3. We went out for a 30 mile cruise in the '56 Roadmaster after supper. It was a lovely evening here, and I stopped here for a couple of pics. This grain field has already been harvested. Unlike in other areas we have had quite a lot of rain so far this summer, which some crops quite like, so it has been good the farmers. Keith
    5 points
  4. One of my old car buddies is Ernie Tuff, great guy, not many of us can say they built a car that was on the pole at Daytona. He told me Richard Petty asked him what was in the car, Hilborn injected 482 stroked Hemi Mopar powered the 61 Ford Starliner was clocked 170 mph, 16 mph faster than Petty's (154mph) lap that year in 1964 (Petty won Daytona that year). When Fireball Roberts took out the car for qualifying he said it would go faster because it was spinning the back tires all the way down the straights. Ernie pop riveted on a 4 inch spoiler on the trunk, now Roberts said it would not turn, but WOW did it go! Ernie kept trimming off 1/4" strips off the spoiler till the car would turn. They slowed down the modified-sportsman class after that...
    5 points
  5. Buy a turn key car, they cost the same as projects now. Take your time. There are more options today than there have been for thirty years. Nothing is more expensive than a cheap car that’s a good deal. Welcome to the club........
    5 points
  6. I met Caroline Kulba in 1960 while I was putting a Buick 322 in my 54 Ford and getting it ready for paint. While not as well known as the persons mentioned above, over the years she has had more positive influences on me than all the above combined. She's now known as Caroline Beck..........Bob Beck
    5 points
  7. Many people here ask me why I don't recommend late 20's and early 30's Cadillac's and LaSalle's for first time pre war cars. Here you go. Much of the car is made out of die cast pot metal. Particularly in 29 & 30 they had terrible problems with it. The entire car has hundreds of pieces made from this stuff. From door handles, seat adjusters, distributors, the list is endless........just like the headaches. Had a friend who's car was running great, then for no reason over the winter....poof........runs like dog doo. Here is what happened. Fast failure over only a few months. Parts are available. 900 Bucks and some labor....figure 300.......presto. You have a distributor again. Ain't life grand? Spend over a grand, and the car runs again. Photo below of bad unit and new casting. Best, Ed.
    4 points
  8. Congratulations! 35,000 and counting...........three thumbs up. 👍👍👍
    4 points
  9. This looks like a nicely preserved wagon, though I wish a little more background/info had been provided. The seller states the car has less than 37,000 original miles. I wonder if that is accurate. Would the material on the side of the transmission hump next to the accelerator pedal be worn this much with so few miles? Would the ribbing on the brake pedal be showing signs of wear on the bottom right with such low mileage? I guess it's possible. Sun and heat can go a long way towards causing the material on the hump to dry up and come apart. Regardless of whether it is 36,937 or 136,937 miles, these photos show what appears to be a well maintained, everyday workingman's station wagon from the '50s. It would be interesting to see some closer detail photos of the interior and the underneath. I'm quite taken with the looks of this car.
    4 points
  10. You need a prewar delivery vehicle like this to advertise your gramophone business: Craig
    4 points
  11. Been trying to use the GS a bit more so I can run the A/C a bit. That is a story in itself but not for this thread. At any rate tonite was a good opportunity to get it out for a run after dinner. Along the way I noticed the corn was getting high. Later on I hit this road which is a spur of the local highway system. No houses and wide open! And usually a place to exercise all the horses... The GS (s) really like this stretch...😚
    4 points
  12. ^^^This. The pump is inside the tank, primarily to keep it cool and to reduce noise. I've done three of these on my 1999 Chevy truck over the last 300,000 miles. Depending on where you're located, rust on the tank strap bolts can cause problems and collateral damage. The connectors from the flex hose to the tank are the GM snap-on connectors that are easy to install on the assembly line but impossible to disassemble without a special tool (and even then, I regularly have problems). Of course if the tank is full (which it ALWAYS is when the pump goes out), you'll need to siphon the fuel out. You also didn't say what your skills are or how you're fixed for tools. A new filter is always a good idea. I have no idea why the pump requires a new harness (I've never replaced mine), but perhaps he means hose assembly, which is possible. The pump assembly looks like this. Note that apparently everyone (even Delphi, which is an OE replacement) has changed the harness connector, requiring you to splice a new connector onto the wires in the truck (perhaps this is the "harness" he's talking about - it comes with the new pump). Prices for this assembly range from just over $100 for Carter brand to just under $200 for Delphi. Bosch is right in the middle. You'll also need to remove the lock ring that holds this assembly in the tank. The filter looks like this and you'll note that it has one threaded flare nut fitting and one push-lock fitting. Price is under $10 for any of the brand name filters. You'll need flare nut wrenches for the flare nut fitting. If the line is rusted, it may become damaged when you try to unscrew it. The bottom line is that this is really a straightforward remove-and-replace task, but for a novice there can be a lot of potential potholes that can trip you up, require longer than you think to finish the job, and potentially still require you to tow it to a shop when you get in over your head. I'm not trying to scare you off, but give you the information to make an informed decision here. In addition to labor, the $1000 quote obviously includes profit, markup on the supplied parts, and contingency in case those bad things happen.
    4 points
  13. The wheels detract to me. Nothing wrong with the original hubcaps.
    4 points
  14. Hello to the ladies & gents of the A.A.C.A. I'm new here & was just checking in. I'm trying to purchase my first classic car, which will be my 2nd car. Pretty well made up my mind that I'm looking for something vintage, not sure why but I do sure like them. I work on windup phonographs from the 1900s to about 1930, manual typewriters, the occasional vacuum-tube radio and reed organ, and other miscellaneous fun things from about 1840 to 1950. Antique crank phonographs have been my favorite hobby for the last 6 years--I've rebuilt some complete garbage & made them into great pieces. Started with a 1914 Victrola upright but have done repairs and restorations on Edisons, Brunswicks, Columbias, and a couple other brands. I like to keep them sounding the way they did when they were first built, so performance is a must. Antiques are fun to buy cheap & fix up. I'm a Southerner but I rode to my current home in Connecticut on my first fix-up automobile project--that was my first car, a handmedown as my parents used it for years & years. In fact it was the first automobile I ever saw, and they drove home from the hospital after I was born with me in the back seat. When I got it, it was around 2018 and the car had not been run very much since Mom & Dad found a newer car in 2016. So I had a mess on my hands, but now I have a fun little car that runs quite well and still gets around 35 miles to the gallon even with a quarter million miles. Some of my favorite classic cars are the Model T and Model A Fords, the Overland touring cars of the 1910s and early '20s, and the postwar Plymouth Deluxes. I also love the look of Packards and old Buicks, but not the price tags. Grew up reading Floyd Clymer's Those Wonderful Old Automobiles. I don't have a prewar car yet but am negotiating a chance to go look at a 1940 Chevrolet four-door this weekend. It's not in great shape, been off the road 30 years. It has the old stovebolt six engine in there, (complete with the hole in the front for a crank handle, LOL) but if it's only kinda trash instead of really trash, I guess I can end up with a neat car. Failing that, I'll stick to saving up & finding a nice old car eventually. Also, I'd like to be able to hang out with other car enthusiasts, learn more about the historical times when these things were built, figure out how they work and how to drive them, and eventually purchase my own classic and save a little more history. Might take me years but that is OK by me. So anyway that is that. I'm glad to be here & hope all of you are well. Charles
    3 points
  15. The day after this walk, I went for a day for a little road trip in Narbonne preperation and it's gone ! little stop and we hit the road And arrived in Narbonne Then we left at 11 p.m. and we arrived at the house at 1:30 in the night In all in all days (the old car ride and Narbonne), the Dodge did more than 500 km ( 320 mile ) , and without any problem
    3 points
  16. For sale on Craigslist: 1954 Plymouth Plaza 2-door Station Wagon in Seattle, WA - $10,000 - Call John: 360 424 407six Calls only Link: https://seattle.craigslist.org/see/cto/d/mount-vernon-1954-plymouth-plaza/7359817119.html Seller's Description: 1954 Plymouth Plaza 2-door Station Wagon odometer: 36,967 transmission: manual title status: clean Less than 37,000 original miles. No Rust! Price is firm. Diamond in the rough. Been stored inside it's entire life. Call John: 360 424 407six No E-Mails Calls only.
    3 points
  17. My initial reaction was yes that's a nice looking wagon, however if it had perfect all one color paint, nice rugs or floormat and in fact it is driveable and mostly show-worthy, the seller would be asking a lot more (like maybe 20K) for it like most sellers do today. I've had some personal experiences with about five 53-54 Plymouths and here in the salt belt they DO GET RUSTY. I think anyone interested should check it out but don't be surprised if the seller's not telling the whole story in the ad.
    3 points
  18. Electronic version: Let me pose this question: Why would a hacker (even an unsophisticated hacker) bother to steal the electronic version of Antique Automobile? I see two reasons: Hackers don't want to pay dues and want the magazine free. Few, if any membership are petty enough to feel a need to steal the electronic magazine to save $45 a year. Even less are technically savvy enough to steal the magazine. It simply doesn't happen. Hackers "steal" the magazine to give it away or sell it. Search for "downloadable antique automobile magazine" on Google. The results are the AACA website, AACA forums, and placing you can buy back issues online. (Amazon and Ebay). Even if people did want to steal AA, or buy it cheap, they can't find it to do so. It simply doesn't happen. Many of you could care less about "electronic" magazines. I enjoy bathroom reading material as much as the next guy. In the case of the VCCA 10% of all members buy the electronic version. Approx 20% of new members buy the electronic version. Electronic magazine's save clubs a boatload of money because they don't have to print and mail the magazine. Bonus for everyone involved. Club makes more money, member gets their electronic magazine immediately. Oh, and another bonus, International members love it. The trend is clear. Postal version: Patience folks. Your day is not ruined it you don't get your magazine on a specific date.
    3 points
  19. Yes of course LED globes light better Yes they use much less power Yes of course this is soooo much worse than phillips head screws. 😱 😂😂😂
    3 points
  20. Wow, that's a lot of people. Hey y'all! Thanks for all the advice! You are right. Here is a pair from my collection--a 1917 Victrola IV & a 1909 Victor III horn talking-machine. The tiny Victrola was squashed in shipping and I had to graft new wood into the top. I restored & refinished it in shellac. The big one is all original except some mechanical repairs and a vintage horn that I painted black (the original color.) Both are fully functional and with the reproducers rebuilt, they have a nice clear sound with the old 1900s-1920s records. Lots of the older records are quite good actually, and the phonographs are reliable. I have a floor model Victrola that's been used six years and has given very little trouble. There's a declining interest in old phonographs so it's actually quite simple to get started in the hobby, and most phonograph collectors are very nice. I think you are right. I looked at parts for the 1940 Special Deluxe and--well, it needs a lot, not to mention busting loose the stuck engine. I think the cost of doing the floors & the appropriate cloth interiors would be the biggest dealbreaker. Thanks for sharing that great video-- Yes, there are lots of parts for the old Fords too. I had originally been planning to buy a Model T. They're my favorite vintage car and Model T's aren't holding tons of monetary value here lately. The performance doesn't matter too much to me, and maintenance is fine. Slow can be a good thing, I think. Sometimes when I am driving home at night I will take a backroad and go slow, let the car lope along at 35 or 40 per hour, put the windows down and just listen to the motor and the birds and all that. Slow is peaceful. My bad! Thank you! I get that mixed up and did not even know there WAS the difference there! Thanks for the clarification. I really enjoy looking at those cars but do not think I could justify spending Locomobile money on a jalopy budget. I cannot afford a luxurious car but would love to buy a Packard one day. As John S in Penna. rightly assumed, I really do not have "classic" money and would probably rather have a more "average Joe" kind of car. That'd be closer to what most people years ago would have driven, and that in itself is just kinda cool. That's a great idea. I lurk the MTFCA a lot--those folks are cool too. A guy gave me a lift in a stock 1936 Ford Deluxe a few years ago & I was taken by the sound, the smell of the thing--it was original down to the upholstery, and riding along in that was absolutely magical. It smelled like my 1930s overcoat and spilled gasoline. I like to work on stuff and all that, but why do I even want an old car? I don't actually know. I got interested around age five, thought they were cool--then got the craving for a Model T when I was eight, and then just kept getting interested in them. I like prewar cars the best as they are simple and I think they are beautiful. I quite agree with you sir. With what I would spend putting running boards, floors, and a bumper on the theoretical 1940, I could have my little white Toyota entirely repainted, redo the undercoating on the fenders, and put new tires on--maybe having money leftover for brakes! That I did do! I spoke over the telephone with a clubman here--A top-shelf gentleman. He had something quite cool up in the for-sale section that really caught my fancy, definitely pre-war with a great engine and a very cool body design. Eminently more suitable for what I'm looking for than the 1940 sedan and a lot smaller too, so that's pretty cool. We shall see. And this is me with a few of my other restoration projects. The typewriter exemplified what you guys were saying about junk cars. I started with a free 1929 Underwood No. 5 typewriter, put $300 worth of restoration into it and two months' labor, and ended up with a $80 machine. The lamp is vintage from the '50s I think, the inkwell is a 1930s Esterbrook fountain well commonly used in post-offices, and the telephone is a manual Kellogg that I plan to use but haven't got wired up yet. Oh, and that's my 1937 Hartmann Tourobe in the corner; those are the easiest way to haul clothes without wrinkling them, bar none. The desk itself is a 1920s-1940s one that I got cheaply. Never mind the cardboard; that's my OTHER luggage! I tend to use my antiques instead of put them on shelves & look at them. Anyway it's nice to hear from you all; thank you all so much for the advice (which I certainly will take!) and I'll definitely be around. Charles
    3 points
  21. I forgot about Paul Neuman. At the time he owned the same kind of business jet I was flying for my company. We both happened to be at Charlotte, NC. I was standing on the ramp by my plane when his pilot approached me, introduced himself and asked if I would give "Mr. Neuman" a few minutes of my time. I agreed and Paul walked up, offered his hand, and we had a pleasant 20 minute conversation about our air planes. The nice thing was he asked for permission to speak with me as an equal..........Which of course I was............Bob
    3 points
  22. Not really automotive, but he did paint schemes for the Detroit buses and other vehicles. I met Peter Max the artist when I was a kid. It was at a psychedelic boutique store in Michigan. He blew up this pillow and gave it to me. It still has his breath in it....
    3 points
  23. In 2007 on the way home from the Gettysburg Glidden Tour, we stopped in Marion NC for some brake work on our motor home. WE stayed in the Motor home while we waited for parts and took our 34 Ford off the trailer to explore that part of NC. On returning to the Tom Johnson's RVing Center & Campground, we were flagged down by a guy who wanted to talk about his racing days in his younger days in his old 34 Ford. We talked for awhile and he finally introduced himself as Marvin Panch. Then he asked me if I saw his car in the RV Center Showroom, the 1960 Pontiac that he won the 1961 Daytona 500 with. I went to see the Pontiac, a stock car with all the factory glass, interior, bumpers and trim except the back of the front passenger seat was gone with the entire rear seat. Even to door panels were still intact in the then 47 year old car. The signage was painted right over the side moldings. Marvin was a regular guy and knew a lot about 34 Fords too. He had 216 NASCAR starts, 17 wins, 96 Top 5's, 126 top 10's and 21 Poles in a 12 year career. Voted one of NASCAR's top 50 Driver's in 1998. Got started in a 34 Ford, just like I did.
    3 points
  24. This requires machining away part of the head to set the seats into. These heads already have a very small space between the valves and are susceptible to cracking. Doing this makes it worse, and creates a near certainty for premature failure.
    3 points
  25. You wouldn't happen to be the fellow who used to call himself PADGETT would you???
    3 points
  26. Lots of YouTube videos on the subject, I would start there to see if it’s something you would want to do.
    3 points
  27. What Ed said. Take your time and get a lay of the land. There are subtleties is what things are called. “Classic” is reserved for high end cars of the 20s, 30s and 40s as defined by the Classic car club. If you want a Classic that’s great but take even more time looking and learning.
    3 points
  28. Fully 25 years ago (I'm sure I'm not recalling everything accurately), I had babbitt let go on one of the rod bearings on my 1936 Pierce 8, the others were marginal at best, but the mains (9) were fine. I had all rods redone, thankfully the journals were perfect. When I first started the engine, the oil pressure was very low. I disassembled the oil pump (clean) but found the relief spring questionably strong, as did a far more knowledgeable friend (sadly, no longer with us). Presumably, some previous owner had changed to a stiffer spring to compensate for low oil pressure due to failing rod bearings. On my friend's advice, I visited three hardware stores and bought examples of 3/8" diameter springs of varying rates/tensions. I cooked them all on a pie sheet at 450* to heat treat them. Then it was time for trial-and-error testing. I installed only 8 of the maybe-30 pan bolts and added only 6 rather than 9 quarts of oil. The first spring gave far too little pressure. Dropped the pan and tried spring #2. In the garage oil pressure with that spring seemed very good, but the spec was at 35 psi hot at 40 mph as I recall. So I added another 12 bolts (still not all) and another quart of oil and went for a 30-minute drive including some highway time. Oil pressure was on spec after 30 minutes on a warm summer day, so I replaced the remaining pan bolts, topped off the oil, and had a celebratory beer.
    3 points
  29. In this photo from left to right: SGV, Stearns, Buick, Overland, Simplex 50, Simplex 50, and a Simplex 38. Quite a collection of horseless carriages!
    3 points
  30. Looks Ok, but what suspension is it using? It looks like it still is operating with the 6 cylinder brakes, rear axle etc. Is it still on 4 bolt wheels? (those 5 bolt things are wheel covers not actual wheels) Did they change the front springs to V-8 specs? What 3 speed trans is it using? (the 6 or the V-8?) Changing a Mustang from a 6 to an 8 is an easy bolt in swap, BUT it should be made 100% 8 cylinder specifications.
    2 points
  31. Yellow metal? I read about that a few years ago and after finding swirls of metallic color I assumed was bronze in drained oil. I started using GL4/ 140 at that time. That said I started reading feedback about the Redline and how well it worked in worn prewar transmissions and differentials. Redline is recommending its use in vintage cars and with that I thought it was worth trying. I plan to drain a sample out after a couple of hundred miles and check for any evidence of bronze. As I have been a fan of their products since the 1970s I trust they are aware of any issues with syncro material in vintage manual transmissions. I think the GL 5 warning was quite broad and might have more to do with a particular brand of oil. The Redline filled tranny now engages with less effort then anything I have used so I assume that means less friction and wear but this is hardly my area of expertise. I do know that many of the suggestions I have read here are just anecdotal BS passed around forever and accepted as gospel usually starting with My buddy's father was a mechanic and he said..etc. As a longtime mechanic of cars and bikes myself I have learned to do my own research. I will post an update after I sample the oil and hopefully keep on using it.
    2 points
  32. I had a perfect record at Ridgefield 1961-1995, when it moved and later died that was a the beginning of the end of other long established meets. I went to the Dragone meet a few months ago, fantastic! That was a total time warp, just like a swap meet from 50 years ago, they will need more space for vendors and cars. Bob
    2 points
  33. Anyone else wonder why when there is plenty of room to space the cars out so they can be viewed and photographed from all angles that they always end up parked in rows? I suppose we're all trained by our parking lot experiences.
    2 points
  34. Seriously though, todays traffic requires us to make things as safe as possible. I say, “see and be seen” Not all will agree What is the saying? You can please all of the people some of the time You can please some of the people all of the time You cannot please all of the people all of the time However, you can please yourself and put up with the critics. Whoever has an original car “As Factory Built” please step forward.
    2 points
  35. I raised this question back about a day ago , about authentic restorations, hoping that some one here would take the bait, and mention a few of the many items incorrect on this Riviera, so thank you Seafoam 65 i was not sure if i would get blasted if i did this. It actually helps us all ,as finding and learning the correct items, parts used, colours, where positioned, etc. We as members of this great club , act as history and museum and time piece in keeping---BUICK--- as they were built, the day they left the factory. Now about the popsicle stick, when i received my 64 Electra convertible 3 months ago, from US look at the front top radiator condition,---yes true story i have always had a couple of these in my tool.--one of the first things i did using those 2 sticks. Wood is still a wonderful product for many uses.
    2 points
  36. The heavy flywheel was to save shifting gears. You can slow to idle speed in 3rd and accelerate away smoothly. This was considered an asset.
    2 points
  37. A very early date by the looks of the vehicles. Photo from facebook The vehicle closest is a "1900 Orient Auto-Go with the optional Forecar kit" - according to a comment.
    2 points
  38. Lost count of the number of fuel pumps that I have replaced in the S-10 trucks & Blazers over the years. Also Astro vans. If the tank is empty it can be a job under $200. If full, then more difficult. If the truck has rusty hardware from living up north in the salt higher probability of problems like twisted off bolts, broken straps, etc.. If a southern truck you're in luck. I have always considered the fuel pumps on those vehicles a 135,000 mile maintenance item +- a few thousand miles. With help you should be able to do the job in a couple of hours. Be sure to follow the recommendation above and look at a few u-tubes prior to starting the job and it will make it easier. Also, if you live in a rust free area, it might be easier to remove the pick up box. There are if I remember only 6 bolts holding it on. Undo the six bolts, the fuel fill neck and a few wires and with friends can be off easier than dropping the tank. I have done both ways to replace the pump depending on the vehicle condition.
    2 points
  39. Well, got most of all the big problems solved except still not getting the clicking sound from the starter/gen for it to line up.. We took the back cover off next to the distributor and just sprayed some electrical cleaner on the comentator while turning over the engine with the crank. Checked all wire connectins. Still not getting the clicking .. I guess I'll just live with it for now.. We have got the motor running smooth and quiet.. Remember this was the motor that was rebuilt in 1933 and was never started until now.. Adjusted the clutch and adjusted the brakes. We are going to get it off of the jack stands in a few days or so and drive it out of the building..
    2 points
  40. Of course, getting to visit with Jay Leno by invitation to his Burbank collection was amazing, but we had met many years earlier when he was a guest Stand-up Comic and I was subbing for another trumpet player in Doc Severinsen's Tonight Show Band.
    2 points
  41. Thank you John: Joan and I were a little bruised and shaken up but we are fine. I can't say the same for Lucy.
    2 points
  42. Genevieve. Great Britain 1953, a rom com with some racing. Presently can be seen on Youtube.com. " Is this the weekend" asks one man to another. " Yes, I'm taking Genevieve to Brighton." replies the hero. Opening line. Regards, Gary
    2 points
  43. 2 points
  44. Meanwhile back at the Dinky Toys bus project….. The bad paint job has been removed using paint stripper and now the bus is once again going through the prep for paint routine. I’ve removed the paint that didn’t come off with the stripper application and I’ve sanded it with 600 grit paper. Next is to wash it with soap and water to ensure no stripper residue is on it and then give it a coat of primer. That step is on hold as we are dog sitting the neighbors White terrier dog and I’ve promised I won’t do anything to change the dog’s color to grey primer or school bus yellow. The dog sitting is all this week so hopefully next week the paint will resume.
    2 points
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