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Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/26/2021 in Posts

  1. My Brother decided to sell his Model A Roadster. A potential buyer showed interest but wanted his "mechanic" to check out the car, which he did. His only negative was that the A was difficult to shift, "probably because the synchronizers were badly worn".
    22 points
  2. A very long day. Reassembled the everything, including the front cover three times--first I forgot the safety wire on the camshaft bolts and then, after putting it together AGAIN, I realized I forgot the cotter pin on the tensioner pulley. Good thing I bought a new gasket because after several on/off/on/off cycles the original was toast. Whatever, I should have been paying attention a little better. Then I installed the generator and fought for a few hours with the water pump drive and oil cooler lines, but eventually prevailed. Then I rebuilt my engine stand and reinstalled the radiator, which was also easier said than done--getting everything lined up where it was before was challenging. I filled it with roughly 7 gallons, bled the water pump using my schrader valve (worked perfectly!), and hooked up the battery. Turned the key and hit the starter button and... nothing. Nada. Dead. Is the battery good? Check. Connections? Good. Oh, crap, the starter button has probably failed. Meh, there's one on the starter solenoid so I used that. Not as easy to manipulate the choke and throttle while reaching down to the starter to crank it, but after some cranking to fill the carburetor, it FIRED and it was a completely different engine. Check it out: As you can see, it idles cleanly at about 600 RPM. The sound is completely different. Plenty of oil pressure. And, perhaps most importantly, temperatures are reasonable and mostly under control. After about 10 minutes it eventually worked its way up to 200 degrees and I shut it off, but it cooled off quickly and fired instantly without any throttle or choke when I hit the button a second time. It is a completely different animal. Some tuning is in order to help it stay cool and to dial out the off-idle stumble, but it is 80% better than it was. Now I can run it long enough to do the tuning without worrying about it going super nova. It still gets hot and it doesn't recover, but there still things to be done, including reinstalling the restrictors. And you will note that it appears to be flowing plenty of water (staying cool) at idle. The water pump is healthy. But, of course, this is my car and it's THIS car, so it wasn't all smiles. There was a peculiar rattle/grumble/growl from the back of the engine, almost like the teeth on the flywheel are just barely touching something. Of course, this is also where the oil pump lives and I couldn't stop thinking about that oil pump mounting bolt that wouldn't tighten and I replaced it with a stud--was it too long? Did it come loose? Were the threads stripped and it worked its way out? Or was it the starter? I pulled the cover off the flywheel and looked around and didn't see anything amiss, although it appears that the starter drive stays permanently meshed with the flywheel gears, even when it's running--is this right? Starter drive is always meshed with the flywheel. Can this be right? Could it be the source of the noise? I started it back up and the sound was still there until there was a sudden and somewhat loud ping and then the noise stopped. So something broke off and stopped rubbing? You can hear it happen in the first few seconds of this video: Was this sound new or was it simply audible now that the engine was running better? And should I be worried about the sound even though it seems to be gone now? I don't know. I can't celebrate without knowing. You'll also note all that oil on the flywheel and in the bellhousing. It appears to be coming out of the center of the pilot bearing, which has a felt seal--am I wrong to assume it will stop once there's a transmission shaft in there? Anyway, two steps forward, maybe one step back. Tomorrow I'll do a compression test to make sure it's all good inside and investigate the sound and see if it's truly gone. If I feel up to it, maybe even do some tuning.
    21 points
  3. Just took delivery of this 1969 Chevrolet C20 truck... it's been three years since I had my other C20 and I missed having one. This one came out of South Dakota, a Bean Farmer had it in his collection - all original truck, really nice! Thanks Bill & Dave with helping me with the transporting. Steve
    18 points
  4. Got a Ford Model TT stake truck yesterday for my birthday! Thanks for all of the birthday wishes. You folks are the best!
    18 points
  5. After many years in this hobby I finally found the proper tow vehicle. the fellow I bought it from assured me it had the factory towing package, although on close examination I question that. I bought it sight unseen and the seller even offered free gas for 6 months. Unfortunately the engine is seized so I'll need to find a good 460 to install.
    17 points
  6. The longest trip since restoration. There had been a few 60 mile trips and the shorter ones to town for gas, etc. I don't know why I was concerned about breakdowns, it ran flawlessly. There is a very scenic highway up to our National Park, narrow, no shoulders, but smooth pavement and lots of gentle turns and some hills. It was the perfect day to do a good shake down trip. It was a little smoky - forest fires to the east of us. My rough calculations revealed about 9 miles per US gallon. Hopefully that improves as it gets broken in. There were no WOT accelerations, I drove like there was a raw egg between my foot and the pedal. I expected better fuel economy, my last (identical) unrestored 65 Riv GS achieved about 12 MPG and that was driving it home from upstate NY to Saskatchewan ( in January 99 ). All in all, it was a great day!
    17 points
  7. There may have been less traffic and fewer venders, but I can tell you there were buyers there…we brought some good stuff to sell, and some not so good stuff too, and sell it did like gangbusters. Even a lot of so-so things found buyers. Best part was seeing old and making new friends. Anyone who stayed away missed a great Hershey with wonderful weather….
    16 points
  8. My friend Frank Seme, who is the local go-to shop for Full Classic engine machine work, has agreed to take the V12 to replace the valves and do a full valve job. He can get it in sometime after Hershey and it'll take a few weeks to get it done (he's very short-handed apparently). I'll do the disassembly and reassembly, he'll just do the valve work. He'll source the valves, guides, springs, and whatever else it needs. I'm trying to look at this as a good thing, since now I'll know that the valvetrain is healthy--it's one of the few things I didn't touch when going through the engine (although I'm starting to doubt my skills and maybe me not touching things is good). Once again, I can't shake the feeling that I'm a fool for being optimistic about this--what was it that Einstein said about doing the same thing and expecting different results?
    16 points
  9. Such wise words that so few practice………..
    15 points
  10. Internet expert.........lots of that today. I belong to about fifteen clubs, one in particular has the “on line expert” who gives advise for everything..........including how to fix the lamp on the dark side of the moon. It’s interesting that his car is always breaking down on tours...........and he carries more tools than a Snap On truck. My other favorite thing.......guys making reproduction parts that have never owned a car........and sell the parts without having ever installed and tested them..........happens all the time.
    15 points
  11. Hello everyone, My name is Mark and I am Doug's youngest son. As some of you may know, my father had passed suddenly yet peacefully in the early hours of Saturday morning on October 9, 2021. My dad was a very hard working man and had a huge passion for automobiles which he adopted from his father, my grandfather, as most of you are aware. And well, as the old saying goes, the apple didn't fall too far from the trees and I too have a passion for the automobile and what it represents. As a result, I ended up with a masters degree in mechanical engineering focusing on engine combustion from the inspiration from my dad and grandparents. I was unaware of these forums until about a year ago when I decided to look them up and follow what my dad had been posting with regards to the vehicles and his daily life. Looking back now, I am so happy I have this so I can always go back and relive some of the memories through his own words and photos. It still amazes me that this forum dates all the way back to 2013 - wow, how things have changed since then! I wanted to let everyone on here know that I will be carrying the torch with regards to updating this forum. I want to honor my father by restoring his Buicks and posting the progress on here - currently, I have the 51 Nash Statesman at my house in the garage and am waiting for a carb kit and head gasket to get her back on the road. I know he would love to see the forum continue as it made him so happy to post on here. He would always tell me, "today my post reached XX thousand views!" He was proud of that and thankful for the comments and overall acceptance into this great community. I am currently working to put together a eulogy and figured I could come to his forum to find some inspiration from his previous posts, which I'm sure that I won't have too hard of a time finding. Thank you all for all of your kind comments and condolences. I have passed them all on to my mom, Doug's wife of 41 years, and rest of the family. This isn't goodbye, but rather see you later with more to come...
    15 points
  12. Well, George you seem to want to push me.........no worries. I own a 1917 White dual valve, with history back to new. The second car I purchased, it’s totally different than the 1917. There is one short wheelbase 1917 known to exist which I have photos of. Has identical controls, dash, it is virtually indistinguishable from my long wheelbase 1917 car. The second car I purchased, It’s not a 1917 which I can prove. I can’t prove if it’s a 15 or 16, (yet) but it’s one of the two. It really doesn’t matter, because horseless carriage club uses a casting date on Fords whether to allow them in or not. Applying their test, this car will easily enter the approved list. I have other cars, that are HCCA accepted already. You seem like you need to try to tear people down, it’s very sad. I share what I do here to help others. It’s interesting that my 1917 White thread is the number two most read and reacted to post on this site in twenty five years. You have 77 posts........I have well over 11,000 and the highest rating on the site..........🤔. I’m not full of myself, I live by my reputation and accomplishments. I help others here by phone, email and yes in person. I actually provide free service to people here in need, especially with carburetors and ignition..........many here who I have helped have become valued friends, too many to list. I share my cars, let others drive them, and find great joy in doing so. As a matter of fact, your the only “downer” I have come across on this site. I will make a long detailed list of the differences between the two cars, along with existing known cars, and the scholarship of it all. I also have photos and detailed history, on three 1915-1916 45 horsepower cars........... Fact of the matter is, for cars built by White.........from 1915 to 1917......they are all in a gray area. Either way, I have two spectacular one off unusual, rare, high horsepower vehicles that are running and driving. I don’t have to tear things down, I build things up. I have serviced countless cars that now run and tour all over the world. I’m certain you’ll keep taking your shots, I will continue on enjoying my cars in ways that you can’t even comprehend. 485 miles in a Duesenberg J last week, a Best of Show in New York at a major invitational Concours in the same week, Hershey this week.......... it’s 51 years since I first attended. Then home for four days, before I attend a Duesenberg tour in the Southeast.......for another 800 miles in a Model J......in four days. Please let me know when you have accomplished one one hundredth of what I have in the car world. It would be nice if you tried to provide proof my new White isn’t a 1917.......and help make the argument for 15 or 16. Either way, it will be on the HCCA national tour in Florida in February....... and probably at Amelia Island in March. The new White will be in Hilton Head and on the Tampa HCCA tour in November. To all my friends, acquaintances, and fellow unknown members here who send me positive thoughts and encouragement........I thank you all very much. And to those special decent people who have come to visit me and my White in the last 12 months.........Dave C, Dave S, Dave C #2, Larry A, Phil S, George, AJ, Orin, and all the others......thanks for your friendship and encouragement. See you on the road.........In one of my White cars....... and probably two more to come.......who knows, a truck is now probably going to be in the garage also. All this fun and adventure......just from a text message. Photos below taken in the last 14 days.......It’s been a busy September.
    15 points
  13. Antique Auto Patina: Rat Rod Patina: To be kind... NOT patina: Old Man Patina:
    14 points
  14. It's been over a year since I parted company with my '29 McLaughlin-Buick. I paid a visit recently to it's new owner and was pleasantly surprised with the improvements he has made. It had always run rich ,and no amount of adjusting on my part seemed to help. Although the carburetor looked correct, turns out it was off a 1930ish Nash Eight. The car was fitted with an electric fuel pump. The new owner opted to install a rebuilt original mechanical fuel pump and just use the electric pump for priming. It now runs considerably smoother and doesn't leave a black sooty stain on the back wall of the garage. He also replaced the 1970s tires with a new set of Firestone 650/20 whitewalls. The wheels were refinished too. The car had undergone a 10 year basket case to show car restoration from 1975-1985 and was in need of some refreshing. It obviously found the right man for the job.
    14 points
  15. Hello My Friends, Attached is my latest project. It is about finished and scheduled for the upholstery shop during the coming Winter. It was a fun, low cost project. I wanted to build a car that looked like one of the 1907 Vanderbuilt racers. The frame is 1913 Cadillac, radiator shell 1916 Studebaker, Hood 1924 Hudson , Cowl 1928 Plymouth. All the sheet metal was reformed to fit. It is powered by a 32 VT golf cart axle. It is the ideal small town parade car. RH steering, dual chain drive, hydraulic brakes, won't over heat, no clutch and can creep along. (top speed about 20 MPH). Last 4th of July my 17 yr old grand daughter drove me in our town parade. It confused a lot of on lookers as a teenage girl was driving and it made no noise. Life is Good, Don Feeney in central Ohio.
    13 points
  16. 20 years ago I used to complain about things that annoyed me at Hershey. With the wisdom of age I'm smart enough now to enjoy it while it lasts.
    13 points
  17. Great video, love the cars. The commercial may be 12-13 years old judging from the dates of the comments on YouTube. My younger daughter works for Shell. She's ready for the next time they film a similar commercial - using Studebakers, of course.
    12 points
  18. Run don't walk. And I love these cars. This really looks like a parts car to be honest. If you pursue one of these I think you will find a lot of alternatives out there.
    12 points
  19. Here are a few of that magnificent Mercer...
    12 points
  20. Personally the new Corvette has re-ignited my interest in them. They are just plain ON FIRE, and given their popularity, they are probably selling like hot cakes. I'm still a bit scared of being one of the first to buy one as I fear getting burned on price. Although Corvette purists are probably inflamed by the article, Chevrolet will use it to stoke the fire of scarcity to explode future sales. Wait till the convertible starts shipping, interest will flair up again, not that it really needs kindling.
    12 points
  21. Our '25 coupe has been neglected the last couple of years. I start it and run it up to temperature but it hasn't turned a wheel until today. Nice to see it out in the sunshine and stretching its' "legs".
    12 points
  22. So we had a great weekend, and drove the '41 over 300 miles all together. The Reatta nearly as much mileage, but since there were three of us we used the '41 for the tour on Sat. The cool thing was the '16 was there as well, for the first time to the former home of it's builder, Sam McLaughlin. The mansion pictured was started in the year me car was built, 1916 too. My '16, the '41 and the Reatta where in attendance, with my wife driving the Reatta. The '41 is pictured in front of the Canadian Automotive Museum which has a great collection of Canadian cars, and cars with Canadian history. It was also a McLaughlin dealership in the early days. This is a shot I've wanted to do a few times, only there are parking restrictions, so you can't do it most weekdays, and when I've been there on weekends with the car there has been cars parked in front. Unfortunately I lost a hubcap somewhere on the road, which is too bad. Also pictured is a shot of the '41 behind the mansion with the greenhouses and upper stories visible. I'll post a few more when I get them off of my camera. A great weekend all together. Keith
    12 points
  23. Right coast, left coast now we hear from the middle coast. Spent 31 years trying to keep a plant in operation. To me and I think fellow employees, refurbish means to return a piece of equipment to operating condition and acceptable appearance. To restore would be to bring it back to original specs and appearances. Repair can lay anywhere between broken and refurbished with appearance being of little importance.
    11 points
  24. These are nice cars, but they're wildly expensive to restore and make no mistake, you'll be starting from scratch with that car. I doubt that "rebuilt" engine counts as rebuilt anymore, seeing as it has been stored open outdoors. In fact, none of the previously restored parts are going to be usable if it has been outside for any length of time, so none of that "already done" work will be to your advantage. There's no point in doing a car like that half way, so you may as well plan on a full restoration. Unfortunately, it will probably cost $200,000+ to turn it into a decent $60,000 car. Heck, the interior fittings are gold plated on the '42s, so lord knows what that will cost... I understand that it's tempting, but that car will break you one dollar at a time.
    11 points
  25. We’ll fall is here. I am back at it. I hope to have a nice new running 237ci in my ‘38 Ply sedan by spring. Tappets and cam are in. I dropped the crank in tonight. Feeling good about it too. Very satisfying. I Mic’d mains and rods. Seem perfect. Ring gap well within spec. Measured bore, taper and out of round. Good. 1 valve guide was too high. 1 valve would not lap-in. Dropped down the one guide. Hand lapped all valves. Oil gallery port parts sealed up. Oil Pressure valve and spring in. Off to grab some plasti-gage now to check main bearing clearances.
    11 points
  26. COVID is responsible for 4.5m deaths worldwide, with 10,000 more daily. Companies like Haartz Co. rely on an international market for their materials. They can't magically snap their fingers and expect the world economy, production and distribution to simply work for them. They are no different than the US automobile industry, where production is stunted due to product outages that are unrelated to the government, but instead to the realities of a worldwide pandemic.
    11 points
  27. I don't know if this link will work for all of you but I drove my son, Cody, and some friends to the Homecoming dance in the '41 Limited this evening (one of the other parents posted this to Facebook so I don't know how accessible it will be): https://www.facebook.com/sdarpel/videos/195233012692698 My son, Cody, is on the right.
    11 points
  28. Day 21, Part 2: I headed west on highway 12. Here's a old vacant farmhouse in Pomeroy, WA: and on to highway 261 and back through Starbuck, retracing the the trip out again. Crossing the Snake River where the Tucannon River connects at Lyons Ferry: Not much chance of getting a picture while on this thing. it is NARROW! Here's one of Google's: There in no road directly north here toward Lind. There is a "T" and you have a choice, you can take highway 260 to Kahlotus, and then highway 21 north, or you can take highway 261 to Washtucna, and then highway 26 to highway 21 north. There really isn't any significant difference in mileage. I went through Kahlotus on the way out, so I went through Washtucna on the way back. Here are some pictures from Washtucna. An old Chevrolet dealer! You can still read the sign if you are standing there, but not in this picture: But you can still read it on waymarking.com 's picture. Sitko Chevrolet Co. A gas station: "Potlatch Yards Inc." Lumber? There must not be many criminals here. Just retracing my original route now via highway 21 north through Lind to Odessa. And then Highway 28 back to Wenatchee. 48585 miles: And 46177 at the beginning of the return trip, so 2408 miles for the return trip including the little side trip to Cloverland: And 43888 at the beginning, so 4697 miles overall including the tour and whatever: It's been fun! Glad you all enjoyed it.
    11 points
  29. The most used, and hardest to lose muscle in the body is the brain. Over the years I have seen my circle of friends diminish, and recently the most influential person in my life, my wife of 57 years died. Many people who have reached a stage in their lives whereby they can afford the time, have the financial resources, and have acquired the skills to restore and collect old vehicles have passed their 50th birthday. And it is a hobby which has a magical effect on others regardless of their age. I do welcome the neighborhood folks, especially the tots and teens into my garage, and it does give my brain a chance to recharge as I tell them about a vacuum fed, gravity dependent, fuel system or a shaft driven water pump with its own universal joints.The external brakes with their mechanical linkages and clevis dependent adjustments is always good for a hour or two of wholesome gab. And, very probably the most memorable minute of his four year young life was when I took my neighbors little boy for a ride around the block on my old tractor. My little collection of vehicles is a statement that I have lived a life which now affords me the right to own and admire some pieces of historical artwork for no reason other than “I CAN”……….and they do open doors to some interesting, inspiring, and I hope, educational conversations with people whom I would otherwise have nothing in common.
    10 points
  30. A local club here in the greater New Orleans area has, for many years, sponsored an annual show, the SOB, otherwise known as Sheriff’s Office Benefit, with a substantial donation to Jefferson Parish law enforcement. Today was perfect weather, and not having any other recent activity here, the turnout was excellent with approximately 400-plus cars, trucks, and a few bikes. Since our ‘37 Roadmaster is not at home, I drove the 1930 Packard which was very well received by both street-rodders and purists alike, and it was a good chance to catch up with friends I hadn’t seen since pre-Covid days. There were a few nice Buick’s in attendance. The ‘33 and the ‘40 were modified with modern drivelines, but the Riviera and the 1955 Roadmaster were authentic. There wasn’t a class for my Packard, and I was there essentially to support the Sheriff’s Office and the club, but did receive a “ TOP 100” plaque.
    10 points
  31. It is a simple answer. The best car to buy is the one where you pay for 25% of the restoration and get the car for free. That math is true on almost every top restored car regardless of marque. The exception being some of the very very high end cars where their value exceeds their restoration costs. There is not a bigger nightmare than someone else's unfinished project for lots of reasons. All of us fall in love with projects because it piques our imagination. There are some highly skilled guys on here that have done some incredible work on their own in relatively short amounts of time, measured in years not decades. But the reality is that most full restoration projects take a decade or more assuming they actually get finished. Life, money, time, ambition all work against finishing the projects.
    10 points
  32. I can agree with all of the responses, either "for" or "against" purchase, because we are all so different as far as age and available wealth. This car would look like a money pit to those who are very well funded. However, to a somewhat younger, very motivated person that feels he will never be able to afford a finished, nice riding big heavy "rich guys car", this car gives that person what seems like "his only chance to ever own one". Lots of fun could be had with the OP's Studebaker, but the sirens call of a big heavyweight open "classic" sure seems tempting when you have the skills, youth and stamina, but can't afford to buy a finished one. At my age now, and being at estate sales for decades, I now see only broken dreams with so many unfinished cars like this flooding the hobby. Even small steps on my unfinished cars seem so much more impossible now even though they are not, when I finally force myself do them. 20 years ago I would have known that this Lincoln is an easy save. Now, it's just another big mountain to climb and my sunsets are very limited. . .
    10 points
  33. Well we went on the last tour for the year with the 1913 Buick on Friday with the Gilmore Museum in Hickory Corners, Mi. It was an 80+ mile tour for the day. Here we are getting ready to go. We had the oldest car on the tour. One of the other persons on the tour could not believe that we would drive a car this old on these tours and in all kinds of weather. I told him that we do and that is part of the adventure through life. We took our oldest grandson Clay on his first tour. He is six. We expect it to be the first of many more to come in the future. We had a great time with him and he really like the day with his grandparents riding in the old car. I can't wait until he can drive on the tours with us. 🙂 Start them young!! Here we are just after lunch. As has happened on other tours it was dry when we went in for lunch and was raining when we came out. The car below in the lower right corner is Joe & Julie Tonietto's Cadillac. They were on the tour with us. It was great to have a lot of other people we know on the tour. It rained all afternoon from a drizzle to a down pour. We have gotten to expect rain on almost every tour. Just part of the driving experience which is kind of replicating the driving "in the day" Below are some of the cars at the Gilmore museum. Our happy grandson getting to see all of the old cars helped to make his day. On this tour we went over 1,800 miles driving this car for the year. Not quite 2021 miles on the mileage challenge, but not bad for a 108 year old car.
    10 points
  34. Yesterday I took my first long drive in my New Yorker. (about 50 miles) First real trip since 1957. It went smoothly and kept up with the traffic on the Mass pike with of plenty of power left over. 40 lbs. of oil pressure, 185 degrees temp. No problems and it shifted with ease. I only used 3rd and 4th and the kick down worked smoothly. The wind noise was louder than the engine. At idle the engine can hardly be heard. I did lower the rpm and it lowed the oil pressure from 40lbs to 20 at idle. I wonder if that is enough? I could not get Corker tires so I am using modern radials 225 15's that add to the road noise. I still have to adjust the choke and read about how to do it today. I am just about to remove the seat covers that have been on it since 1949. They are a beautiful blue color (Wool?) (my car is technically is a 49 as it was built in the first part of 49 due to production problems with the new 49's. 🙂
    10 points
  35. Mark, I am so sorry for your loss. I met your Dad through these forums and the Buick Club of America; he visited a few times and we really enjoyed our time together. We were looking forward to his first post-lockdown visit to Michigan and a caravan ride to the 2022 Buick National meet in Illinois. He spoke of you often and was very proud of you and your accomplishments. I'm happy to see that you plan to honor Doug by keeping this thread updated as you continue in his footsteps. I'll send you a PM about some parts and documents I had pulled together for your Dad; we can talk whenever is convenient. Joe Tonietto
    10 points
  36. I say that people who think electric cars is the “solution” can’t see behind the wall. Yes, nice clean electric, just plug it into the wall socket. But, that power has to come from some generating facility. Coal, gas, nuclear, hydroelectric. Sure, solar and windmills, but those two are insignificant in the overall power production. Both of those have operating costs and depreciation/ life of asset/ payback that are not favorable. In the end, the use of electric vehicles doesn’t help the environment near as much as some would preach to you….
    10 points
  37. Haartz Co. is a top of the tree company that does everything it can to serve customers and I know for a fact have gone out of their way to help customers any way they possibly can; sometimes the factors outside of the company that they have to rely on , (can happen to any company) , do not come through so then they can not get you what you are focusing on. No company I know is in business to frustrate a customer.
    10 points
  38. When the P.A. Announcer said, " Now to Honor America, we will play our National Anthem", I realized, for me, how much that was missed, and what a great way to start off every day at Hershey ! What we take for granted and complain about, I think we keep missing the point. We should be so grateful just to be able to be there, looking at cars, digging through parts, meet with friends, and enjoy the show. The weather was good , the cars were great, and , as always, the people were spectacular! I want to thank the Hershey Region of the AACA for all their hard work, and thank Steve Moskowitz, ( who after all these years I finally met) , for all that he does in to make Hershey the Greatest Car Show On Earth. Thanks, John S.
    10 points
  39. I’ve been looking for a few years for a gear cover, Pierce shaft drive bicycle, as one of mine has it missing. If you saw it, near impossible to make, and bike collectors laugh when you ask if they have a spare. It’s two deep draw pieces, made with a right angle and held together with three long bolts. As Ed mentions, unobtainium. A fellow stopped at my spot, started looking at an item I had for sale, and laid a gear cover on my table as he looked at the item. Holy Balls, Batman. I asked him, is it for sale? He said he’d bought it earlier in the day, for a friend back home. He then picked it up, looked at it, and said “but I haven’t told him yet”. He named what was a fair price and I immediately told my wife to pay him. Shown is just the top half, I have the bottom too of course. To have such a rare part just appear was one of the highlights of the meet! Only at Hershey….
    10 points
  40. It's the same as if a case of toilet paper went up in flames, they can always make more! Now if it was a truck load of 1930 Packard Super Eight dual cowl phaetons that would be a terrible loss!!!
    10 points
  41. Tuesday 10/5/21. I may have found an unorthodox way of doing a bead. I took a flat metal bar about three inches long x one inch wide by 3/8 inch thick and rounded the long edge. I put this on the Inside of the fender flange resting on the flange then I put a board on the out side of the fender along the edge of where the bead is so the bead shows. I then took my vice off the work bench and put it on so the board and the metal bar were in the jaws. I tightened the vice, pounded on the board and bead with my dolly behind the fender. Tighten the vice and pounded etc etc etc. I got a fairly decent bead. But I forgot to take a pic. I wanted to test fit the grille (thank you George for having a complete one handy) just to be sure the fenders were bent out enough. Fit like a charm. I’ll take it out and go back to hammer/dolly work for the next few days. Pic below is after crash and now then before the crash. dave s
    10 points
  42. Loading up the trailer for Hershey and the UPS man stopped by with my new head gaskets. Managed to find some NOS steel gaskets rather than the repro copper ones. Hopefully they work better, although I didn't have any problems with the Olson gaskets I was using, and after what that engine went through, they probably weren't going to fail in the future. Cross one thing off my Hershey shopping list, although I'm still hoping to find a pair of horns (any type of 6V compact horn would be fine). See you guys there!
    10 points
  43. We'll be in our usual spots in the car corral, B67-B69, adjacent to the Orange field. If you're walking counter-clockwise around the corral loop, we're just past the crosswalk to the AACA HQ and Saturday show field. Look for the giant red 1937 Packard: I very much look forward to seeing/meeting you all when we're there (Melanie, in particular, has a great deal of gratitude to share with many of you). Thank you for your support and encouragement, it really means a lot.
    10 points
  44. For completing the New London, Iowa to Brighton, Iowa drive everyone was given a certificate of completion. The certificate had the official city seal from both cities. Very nice touch. Everyone that came on the tour was given a very nice medallion. It is about 3 inches in diameter.
    10 points
  45. IMHO, if someone was to ask that question, I would be proud to answer yes. I’m doing 99% of the work. We all should be proud. I know I am. Dad always said to be proud of what you did on a vehicle. I work hard doing the restoration on the fire truck. I have done almost everything on it at this point and I’m proud to say so. Mike
    10 points
  46. I write several tour routes a year for the local Horseless Carriage Club regional groups. These are hub tours - that is, we almost always expect to spend tonight in the same motel we spent last night, having driven somewhere between 60 and 120 miles during the day and having stopped at various places to see a collection, or visit a country store, or have lunch, or - ALWAYS!! - have ice cream. Every driver on the tour gets a book that shows each day's route in detail. Obviously, with brass cars, we don't want to get anyone lost, we want to avoid busy roads as much as possible, we want to cross busy roads safely at a traffic light if possible, we want scenery, and we sure as blazes don't want anyone to find himself on an on-ramp to an Interstate in a two-cylinder Buick. I ask the tour master where he wants to leave from and return to, what destinations he wants to visit with their street addresses, where he wants to eat and have ice cream. The tour master knows these things because he lives somewhere nearby; I live in New Jersey and often don't have a clue. Then I go to a route mapping program on my computer. There are several; I use one designed for hikers and cyclists called Map My Fitness. I start at the motel, and look at the general lay of the land to see roughly where we're going and what I want to avoid in getting there. Then I zoom in and look at individual roads to get an idea of what will intersect with what to find a nice route. Then I go to satellite view and zoom WAAAYYYY in. Sometimes I can see the shadows made by the stop signs and their poles. Then I write detailed, step-by-step instructions as if the computer program were giving me an accurate description of what a driver would see in the real world. WHICH, OF COURSE, IT NEVER IS!! So then it becomes the tour master's job to get somebody's butt out on the real road and make corrections, which I will then incorporate into the final instructions. Now, if your objective is to string several days together into one long trip, you're not going to do all this. On the other hand, you're probably not contemplating this trip in a two-cylinder Buick, so getting on the wrong road is an inconvenience but not a catastrophe. I only suggest that computer programs like Map My Fitness exist, and can give you a lot more detail than you need, so you can learn to use them to whatever extent you feel will help you plan the trip you'd like to take. You won't have a local tour master choosing destinations for you, but if you expect to go through Lonesome Sagebrush County in East Dakota, you can look up points of interest on the Lonesome Sagebrush County website and use Map My Fitness to help you find the ones that appeal to you. There's a fellow named Steve Jelf who lives in (I think) Nebraska and has a 1915 Model T. This year he drove it to the Old Car Festival at the Henry Ford in Dearborn, usually sleeping out in a tent near someplace he could use a bathroom. Most of us would opt for a bit more (OK, OK, a LOT more) comfort than that. Steve usually uses local county maps to plan his route to avoid ugly roads. He posts on the Model T Ford Club of America website and is very popular there. If he can do it - - - Gil Fitzhugh, Morristown, NJ
    10 points
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