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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/02/2021 in all areas

  1. Matt, I just wanted to give you a little encouragement and share my own thoughts, and I suspect I speak for many......thanks for sharing all of this, especially the difficult frustrating failures. I don’t have anywhere near the mechanical abilities of yourself and others who are chiming in to help you, so I am staying silent. I am following the thread closely, learning so much I feel like I should be charged “tuition”, and cheering like crazy for you.
    9 points
  2. In the past when I’ve had weird are oil pressure problems, I pulled the oil pan. I then used as a pressure pot to pressurize the system while looking at it from the underside with a flashlight. In one case we found a large fracture in one of the main oil gallery lines. It’s a good diagnostic tool to see if you have a blowout somewhere. Since you’re going to dig the oil pump anyways, I recommend you do this test.
    8 points
  3. Never meant to break any record. Just trying to share information and learn as I go. Thanks.
    7 points
  4. I have been unable to respond. Here is the full story. First , the magazine was not three weeks late in being mailed. It was scheduled for July 13th and was in the mail the 23rd through the 26th. Several problems contributed to this including staffing at our printer. As everyone here knows getting people back to work is no small task these days. We cannot guarantee when USPS will actually deliver your copies...most times it works pretty good but as well all know not all the time. The digital copy available to the public is supposed to be an issue or two old and the current copy available to members only. However, the straight answer is that we just have had too much on our plate this year with trying to get this building ready, our own COVID issues, the resumption of our events, etc. Staff is working very hard but it just has been overwhelming. We promise to do better in the future and our apologies.
    7 points
  5. Update on the New Yorker…..I thoroughly cleaned the engine and compartment including the carb and linkage. I then cleaned the three electrical connections to the carb. On a whim I started the car and it idled beautifully. Idle speed and mixture were at factory recommendations. A small but satisfying victory! I guess I was born with the cleaning gene….my sister got the shopping gene.
    7 points
  6. As promised, I did a few basic changes. First I chopped the muffler off. Was the muffler a restriction generating heat? Then I removed the oil cooler bypass that Gary gave me and reinstalled the original oil cooler. Not particularly difficult although it was a little awkward working under there. I also removed and disassembled the bypass valve for the oil cooler in case it was the source of the low oil pressure. Unlikely. It's a simple plunger and a spring that opens up a passage back to the crankcase if the oil is too cold and thick to pass through the oil cooler. Even if it was completely non-functional, I can't see how it would have any effect on oil pressure. Oil cooler reinstalled. Bypass is visible on top of the outer tube. Bypass for the oil cooler is a simple device that probably does not affect oil pressure either way. Cleaned and reassembled it anyway. The result? A very loud V12 that didn't go supernova. It ran longer than it ever has and didn't overheat. It gradually climbed up to 200 but not like it did before and it wasn't violently steaming and puking. I even got it to idle on its own for about a minute and while idling at 450 RPM it was holding about 180 degrees. Looks like the muffler was part of the problem. I never would have suspected. I'm still not convinced there isn't something else amiss and I may yet drill a vent hole in the water pump. The radiator seems to be doing its job with the top very hot and the bottom almost cool enough to touch. Is the water pump moving enough water? Is the radiator flowing at the proper rate? I just don't know. And the manifolds are still seriously hot when it's running. Is it too lean or too rich? I fattened it up to get it to idle and to be able to release the choke, but I'm not sure that didn't add to the heat problems. But if I can get it to run on its own, I can tune it. Right now it stalls instantly when I crack the throttle. All that said, my oil pressure problems are only getting worse. When it's running smoothly, there's decent oil pressure (~20 psi). When it stutters, it drops instantly. Eventually it was running along at 800 RPM with 0 PSI showing on the gauge. I have found a rebuilt oil pump and I'm not going to run it any more until I get it installed. I'm just worried that I've done some harm to the important parts, so I don't want to make things worse. I haven't decided how we'll proceed with installing the pump, either somehow put the test stand on one of the lifts and change it on the test stand or pull it off the test stand and put it back on the work stand. I hope I can figure it out. And as long as I'm tearing it apart, I guess I'll send the manifolds out to be coated and I'll rebuild the carburetor--does anyone have any recommendations for a good carb rebuilder? I think this is progress but I've taken so many steps backwards that there's still a long way to go.
    7 points
  7. Hello to the ladies & gents of the A.A.C.A. I'm new here & was just checking in. I'm trying to purchase my first classic car, which will be my 2nd car. Pretty well made up my mind that I'm looking for something vintage, not sure why but I do sure like them. I work on windup phonographs from the 1900s to about 1930, manual typewriters, the occasional vacuum-tube radio and reed organ, and other miscellaneous fun things from about 1840 to 1950. Antique crank phonographs have been my favorite hobby for the last 6 years--I've rebuilt some complete garbage & made them into great pieces. Started with a 1914 Victrola upright but have done repairs and restorations on Edisons, Brunswicks, Columbias, and a couple other brands. I like to keep them sounding the way they did when they were first built, so performance is a must. Antiques are fun to buy cheap & fix up. I'm a Southerner but I rode to my current home in Connecticut on my first fix-up automobile project--that was my first car, a handmedown as my parents used it for years & years. In fact it was the first automobile I ever saw, and they drove home from the hospital after I was born with me in the back seat. When I got it, it was around 2018 and the car had not been run very much since Mom & Dad found a newer car in 2016. So I had a mess on my hands, but now I have a fun little car that runs quite well and still gets around 35 miles to the gallon even with a quarter million miles. Some of my favorite classic cars are the Model T and Model A Fords, the Overland touring cars of the 1910s and early '20s, and the postwar Plymouth Deluxes. I also love the look of Packards and old Buicks, but not the price tags. Grew up reading Floyd Clymer's Those Wonderful Old Automobiles. I don't have a prewar car yet but am negotiating a chance to go look at a 1940 Chevrolet four-door this weekend. It's not in great shape, been off the road 30 years. It has the old stovebolt six engine in there, (complete with the hole in the front for a crank handle, LOL) but if it's only kinda trash instead of really trash, I guess I can end up with a neat car. Failing that, I'll stick to saving up & finding a nice old car eventually. Also, I'd like to be able to hang out with other car enthusiasts, learn more about the historical times when these things were built, figure out how they work and how to drive them, and eventually purchase my own classic and save a little more history. Might take me years but that is OK by me. So anyway that is that. I'm glad to be here & hope all of you are well. Charles
    6 points
  8. Always enjoyable to read Keiser's posts and the pics of him as a young guy with his car never get old. 😁👍
    6 points
  9. Some pics from yesterday's show, a great day, we even beat the rain and got the topless A back inside abput 30 minutes before it hit... 😁👍 1932 (Unrestored!!)Packard & 1910 Mitchell (have never seen one of these, it was huge!) Followed by Packard Rollston body & a bunch o' open As including ours.
    5 points
  10. Rene Dreyfus the pre war French race car driver and his brother Maurice who was his head mechanic, Sterling Moss English race car driver - had lunch together, Ed Marks and Carl Doman - chief engineers at the Franklin Company and later for Air Cooled Motors that made the engines for Bell helicopters and the Tucker car, spent a vacation week with them each year in central NY, Alec Ulman who started the Sebring race course in Florida, Janet Guthrie - race car driver , collectors Bill Harrah and Austin Clark were very close friends - vacation each year with Bill and other car people and the Hershey show as well, Austin was my boss for several decades when I worked for him in his library/archives, Charles Addams the cartoonist was a car guy/friend too that I supported he in and his wife Tee in a charity event, modern artist/sculptor Richard Lippold was another car guy friend. They were all just down to earth people ( except Alec who was the showman 24/7) . Plus numerous former employees of the Franklin Car company in the early 1970s when I helped host annual luncheon to honor them - oh the stories they could tell - especially former test driver Howard Carey, who would roll a test car at least once a month when he worked for Franklin .
    5 points
  11. Buy a turn key car, they cost the same as projects now. Take your time. There are more options today than there have been for thirty years. Nothing is more expensive than a cheap car that’s a good deal. Welcome to the club........
    4 points
  12. Fully 25 years ago (I'm sure I'm not recalling everything accurately), I had babbitt let go on one of the rod bearings on my 1936 Pierce 8, the others were marginal at best, but the mains (9) were fine. I had all rods redone, thankfully the journals were perfect. When I first started the engine, the oil pressure was very low. I disassembled the oil pump (clean) but found the relief spring questionably strong, as did a far more knowledgeable friend (sadly, no longer with us). Presumably, some previous owner had changed to a stiffer spring to compensate for low oil pressure due to failing rod bearings. On my friend's advice, I visited three hardware stores and bought examples of 3/8" diameter springs of varying rates/tensions. I cooked them all on a pie sheet at 450* to heat treat them. Then it was time for trial-and-error testing. I installed only 8 of the maybe-30 pan bolts and added only 6 rather than 9 quarts of oil. The first spring gave far too little pressure. Dropped the pan and tried spring #2. In the garage oil pressure with that spring seemed very good, but the spec was at 35 psi hot at 40 mph as I recall. So I added another 12 bolts (still not all) and another quart of oil and went for a 30-minute drive including some highway time. Oil pressure was on spec after 30 minutes on a warm summer day, so I replaced the remaining pan bolts, topped off the oil, and had a celebratory beer.
    4 points
  13. Out with a small group of pre '16 enthusiasts Sunday, from left to right '13 White, '06 Cadillac and our '13 Buick, great day when they all run well. Regards, Gary
    4 points
  14. I would not try to "lighten up" the flywheel. The mass of the flywheel is an asset to keep the car from stalling when starting out. There are reasons the engineers of the time did design the way they did. When someone starts to redesign the car you usually end up with other problems.
    4 points
  15. With the way the AACA has handled all of the challenges of the last 18 months I feel as absolutely NO apologies are needed or warranted in any aspect of the organization. I believe USPS says periodicals can take up to three days to be delivered AFTER it arrives in the local post office based on each carrier’s mail load. They also usually take up to 10 days (even when co-mingled which is supposed to be most efficient) to go from the entry point to the local post office. These schedules have been totally forgotten about during the pandemic. Printers schedules are and have been for the last year totally up in the air and unpredictable. The quality and great stories this publication has given all of us has been a great joy for me over this last year plus of lockdown. I’m sure many of you will agree. If so I hope you will let Steve and all the great people at AACA know that. dave s ps - I speak from some knowledge about magazine circulation as I’ve owned one of the larger circulation fulfillment computer service bureaus for over 40 years. We processed over 120 pubs a month until COVID-19 closed most of them. We still process the oldest Automobile magazine being published. edit note - I should have said “the average delivery time based on what the USPS sorting center managers we deal with on a regular basis state these times as what normally happens”. The USPS will not state any guaranteed delivery times for any class of mail. Sorry for not being clear.
    4 points
  16. Buick called this Coral, and this color looks correct for it. The lighting makes a major difference, but it does in fact have a slight orange pigment in it and looks peach-ish in person.
    4 points
  17. Yep, I agree, next step is to replace the oil pressure gauge and confirm no blockage or leak on the line that feeds it.
    4 points
  18. Congratulations! 35,000 and counting...........three thumbs up. 👍👍👍
    3 points
  19. I met Caroline Kulba in 1960 while I was putting a Buick 322 in my 54 Ford and getting it ready for paint. While not as well known as the persons mentioned above, over the years she has had more positive influences on me than all the above combined. She's now known as Caroline Beck..........Bob Beck
    3 points
  20. About 28 years or so ago, I had a supplier take me to a day of time trials at Indy. I had a pass for the garage area, and while I didn't meet him, by chance I pee'd next to Mario Andretti in the garage men's room urinal trough.
    3 points
  21. I never really kept track. Meeting them was important, but after a while I came to realize they are just like all of us, and it's the love of the automobile that brings us together. First time i ever really noticed I was in the company of someone "famous" was at a swap meet in Michigan many years ago. I'd made the rounds and had a bag stuffed with spark plugs, a nice brass lamp, and a few other trinkets. The big brass multiple twist horn wouldn't fit so I carried it. While headed back to the car to dump my stuff off to make another round, a guy behind me remarked - "wow, that's a neat horn." We stopped, and sat at a nearby picnic table to empty our bags and talk about our treasures. I learned a lot about that horn- it was made in France in the very early 1900s. In turn, I drooled over a fabulous early brass sidelight in his bag. After talking at length about our hobbies, collecting spark plugs, etc, the guy said I needed to come visit him and look over his collection. He handed me a card and then realized I was talking with Dick Teague-a legend in the old car hobby, and of course a famed designer with a long heritage in the automobile industry. There were others - Austie Clark, Beverly Rae-Kines, and so many others. Even the late Tom Gerrard was someone who just came over and sat with us at a dinner table somewhere at an AACA meet. It was only later that I learned who he was. It doesn't matter, really. We all had fun, and the memories will indeed last forever. Terry
    3 points
  22. For Sale: 1951 Henry J Sedan - $13,900 - Boiling Springs, PA 1951 Henry J Sedan - cars & trucks - by owner - vehicle automotive... (craigslist.org) 1951 Henry J - 2 door sedan - made by Kaiser Frazer. Only produced 4 years. Six cylinder, 3 speed manual w/overdrive. Antique license - have added seat belts and turn signals for safety. Mileage unknown - had to replace the speedometer/odometer. Contact: no phone listed. Copy and paste in your email: eda6888d6011383eaae2c89187366875@sale.craigslist.org I have no personal interest or stake in the eventual sale of this 1951 Henry J Sedan.
    3 points
  23. Installed the front axle with the springs and drums. Installed the rear springs and put the rear banjo in place. Today was sand blast Sunday as I blasted all the brake rods after going through them and finding the best ones as the owner had extras. I removed the adjustable clevis, cleaned up the threads, and straightened all the bent ones. I blasted the steering tube and the oil pan. The owner had painted the oil pan with brushed red oxide primer then the proper dark chevy gray but the thick brush marks didn’t look good compared to what the complete sprayed motor would look like so I removed all the paint and primer. I’ve learned working on so many of these old cars now to never trust a painted oil pan no matter what so I always blast them clean. Sure enough, a typical rust through hole showed up close to the drain plug. I’m sure the owner never saw it and because he didn’t blast it, it didn’t show. Nothing worse than rebuilding a motor and having the oil pan leak after you put it in the car. These old stovebolts leak anyway no matter how good you have them sealed up so any additional ways to leak need to be fixed. Got out the mig welder and welded up the pan. Ground the weld down, sprayed some brake cleaner inside the pan in the area of the hole and checked for any weeping. Took a couple touch ups to the area to seal it. A skim coat of JB weld on the inside just for assurance was added to fill any pitting. It was a small area smaller than a dime. Even though I attached the springs, I have to replace all the spring bolts as they are worn almost half way through. I’m waiting on them from the filling station. This car has to have a ton of miles on it as major components are really worn and I’m systematically replacing them all as a good restoration should do. I took apart the steering box to find the remnants of a bearing cage in the bottom and a badly floating around shaft. It turns out both the upper and lower worm gear bearings have disintegrated and not only have the races worn heavy grooves in the shaft, but the upper and lower bushings has also badly cut into the shaft. I could probably turn the bottom of the shaft and press on a proper diameter steel bushing to repair the bottom but the top of the shaft is constant diameter from the upper mast bearing all the way down to the top worm bearing. I would have to fill the grooves with weld then turn the weld down but that’s a ton of work so finding another box is a much easier and cost effective idea. I have a 31’ box but I’m not sure if it will work in a 30’. I have to do some research and see. I’ll be getting all the blasted pieces to powder tomorrow so I can keep moving forward on this.
    3 points
  24. I don't know about electric start, but the way you are presenting this car is a winner! I am showing this pic to my wife! Maybe I can bring the '38 inside the house.... Cheers, Dave
    3 points
  25. A speeding ticket at a higher than posted highway speed limit would be a trophy in a 92 year old car! The higher the over speed, the more value it has. Well, as long as the ticket price is paid by someone else, or perhaps by YouTube video ad proceeds. So, Ed - get it out on the highway and drive like you're in Florida. I'll promote your video views. I'll even ask all six of my friends to watch it as many times as possible.
    3 points
  26. I think he is going to have to put it on sale though to sell it. Most likely a drastic sale. Franklin made some nice cars but I don't see this one really exciting anyone as presented and especially not at 30G.
    3 points
  27. Get a snap on oil pressure guage in it. Don’t run it unnecessarily until it’s addressed. I would not trust that guage.
    3 points
  28. Spent a lot of time in the garage today. Completed all the panels in terms of being ready for the next round of primer. Started with the driver's side rear fender. It had a large low spot in it, possibly because of what ever fell on it decades ago. I applied a large amount of filler (Photo 1), then sanded it down. Not as bad as it looks, it's not very deep, but this was needed to fill in the many imperfections from the large amount of damage it had. The doors are better than I thought, they were both about 95% complete already. Just had one small ding I had to fill (Photo 2) on one of the doors. The edges of the doors are high spots, since the aluminum skin is crimped around a steel frame; one final round of about 4 coats of high-build primer should do the job. Doors are nice and smooth at a 320 grit sanding right now. Had a lot of success with the panels today, so kept the momentum going. The trunk was better than I thought it was the last time I worked it, so moved the rear of the body. Here's the lower rear driver's side of the body, adjacent to the trunk aperture and tire (Photo 3). There was more damage here from whatever crushed the fender, in the form of some fairly deep dents. I hammered them out a little, but there is a lot of bracing underneath, so didn't get them as nice as I'd like to. I hammered down the high spot a little to shrink it, and that helped, but the dents still remain. Gave a large part of the rear some filler, but I either didn't get my filler mix quite right, or I'm having some adhesion problems with the green sealer/primer, but probably both. Had to strip it all off again and start over. Very wasteful and time consuming, but mistakes are made. Hit a small section again after stripping most of the primer/sealer down to bare metal and did an extra special job of cleaning it. Worked okay this time (Photo 4). Have since sanded this down and it stuck. Did some touch up as the low spot is still a little low, and will continue sanding the next session. Body is rougher than I thought, so will need some extra work. It appears folks may have sat on the rear deck a lot, as the areas in between the bracing underneath are all low and will need some hammering and filler to be even. Overall, pleased with the progress, but still a lot of work to do with the body and panels.
    3 points
  29. weather held today for show today in perth ny. my electra
    3 points
  30. Wow, tough crowd. 😄 I think one needs to look at this more from a 1961 perspective. Thin ties, Playboy club key, guilt free cigarettes. I think it's a very chic example of a bygone custom era. I would drive that car up and down Santa Monica Blvd. all day long listening to Dean Martin on the AM radio and get nothing but thumbs up at every intersection.
    3 points
  31. Next came the more complicated exterior door latch assembly. Two of mine had cracks and were bent out of shape. This is a weak point on this car. When ply33 sent me some replacements from his stash I was worried as they were slightly different - mainly the steel was thicker, making for a more sturdy unit. I had to disassemble them to switch over some parts, so I was starting with just the basic main section. The biggest problem was the fact I'd had to grind off some rivets to get things apart. They were stepped rivets and I was afraid I might have to turn then on a lathe. Luckily I found replacements from Hanson Rivets and ordered them. They are exactly the right size and depth except of the bottom part of the shaft, which was slightly too large for the existing hole. Here is the main piece and the new rivet. The rivets are nicely made and just the right size. They have many sizes and depths available. I had to drill out the hole in the plate to accept the slightly larger rivet shaft. It needed a 1/4 inch hole. The rivet fit perfectly. The rivet holds the latch slider. It has to be properly stepped to allow the piece to slide back and forth. The pieces assembled. Everything assembled and the spring in place. That's another stepped rivet holding the extension arm. Getting that spring in is no easy task! Three done and the fourth is already in the door.
    3 points
  32. Drove the recently purchased New Yorker home today……97 mile trip……85 deg.F with no cooling issues. 40 lbs. oil pressure, does not drop hardly at all when idling. One problem I have is the idle is high, cannot lower it without the car dying. I could not find any vacuum leak. Tomorrow I will spend the day cleaning inside, out and underhood as I do not like working on dirty cars.
    3 points
  33. In this photo from left to right: SGV, Stearns, Buick, Overland, Simplex 50, Simplex 50, and a Simplex 38. Quite a collection of horseless carriages!
    2 points
  34. Does the AACA Library have a speed dial connection to him? Thanks for all the info you have shared over the years. Bob
    2 points
  35. No problem, the concerns were legitimate and I believe the current issue is now up.
    2 points
  36. Between the sub assemblies I've been blasting and painting pulleys, brackets, etc...
    2 points
  37. I've been making good progress getting ready to install the interior and top. Before I actually kick that off I needed to cut/buff the tub. While that has gone just fine, I did the cut/buff inside rather than outside because it was hot outside... like really hot. I had read to do the wet sand and cut/buff outside because of the "great light". Well... that might be true for those with poor lighting in their shop, but it appears that I should've been doing this inside. I definitely did not get all the scratches out of some of the panels as once I brought them into the shop I could see some issues. It isn't a problem but it does mean more time as I'll need to re-sand and cut/buff some areas.
    2 points
  38. I met Gordon Buehrig once at an AACA meeting at the Henry Ford Museum. WONDERFUL man! He brought some of his artist renderings and was a great speaker. I think I was 16 years old.
    2 points
  39. Yes..."regulator" simply means the bypass valve that is "regulating" the pressure. I'm guessing it's a simple ball and spring valve. If so, an old used car trick to falsely increase the oil pressure reading was to put a stiffer spring in there or something behind the spring. I'm certainly not recommending that but it tells us that the spring rate is important. If the spring has weakened, the valve will open prematurely. Unfortunately, I've no idea how you find out what the spring rate should be.
    2 points
  40. It looks like a very nice car--at least from the 3 pictures, taken perhaps 30 years ago!
    2 points
  41. I want to take a bow for my contribution to this effort. I'm the one that taught Ed how to hold his phone when he's taking a video. Darryl pointed out the missing cover on the running board apron. Now whenever I see a picture my eyes go right to that hole. I'm assuming that is for lubing the spring perch?
    2 points
  42. Yes, and I vaguely recall someone in the forum looking for or looking at a 1936 GMC, and the engine was the later one like in this car, but the correct one was the one like I posted above with the partial water jacket and the different oil filler location. Pontiacs were occasionally also used, for instance in the 1938 1/2 tons, but overall GMC flathead sixes were mostly Oldsmobile engines.
    2 points
  43. I agree 100%. It is a nice car, no doubt about that, but for this price the entire car should be immaculate. The engine compartment sure looks original to me, but does it look that scruffy after only 14,000 miles? I also agree with your comment on the color. IMO Coral has a bit of an orange tint, this is a pink car.
    2 points
  44. Love it or hate it, cars like this help keep the "Not Mine" sales section interesting. 😉
    2 points
  45. That was Phil’s first time ever driving the car. I hadn’t given him any tips on how to drive it. Baptism by fire is the shop motto. He’s got short legs, and the bucket seats make pedal action difficult at best for him. The carburetor is off a boat......so acceleration isn’t normal or easy.....he adapted quite fast and made the best of it, when we install the new exhaust and two barrel intake manifold and carburetor with a power valve......this puppy is going to fly. Would love to speed test it.......car is simply not ready for it yet. Brakes are great after all the new springs, lubrication and adjustment. Ride is much better when the shocks have oil in them. Engine is whisper quiet.Hard application of breaks and the car behaves well and stays straight. Tires are quiet, and well balanced. Front end and steering box were all correctly serviced and lubricated. Handles like a giant late 1920’s car. You can easily get into trouble hot dogging the car especially in the turns. Reminds me of our DV in the corners.........PAY ATTENTION! I probably had ten miles on the car before this trip. It really hadn’t been down the road in any real way in many decades. It still needs more time........we haven’t even looked at the under hood yet. I’m certain the timing is off, and there is lots of room for improvement. Most interesting impression? It’s built much better than I realized, the sleeve valve motor is a torque monster, it will spin up to higher RPM’s than you think it should......and it’s still happy and quiet. It’s got ridiculous mid range and upper end power. It’s doesn’t come awake until you hit 40 mph.......then it pulls like a freight train.........and you run out of road and balls before you get to 70. I can’t find any faults with this machine or platform. It was a 10,000 car new. Work on it, drive it, and you understand why it was in the Duesenberg numbers area when sold. I met Herman Brunn back in the 70’s.......sure wish I knew I was going to be a caretaker of this machine......a I could have asked a hundred questions. I work on a lot of the worlds coolest junk.....I mean heavy iron. This car is truly a surprise in its build quality and performance. I would own one in a minute flat if giver the opportunity.
    2 points
  46. Good eye Chris, I didn't touch the two concave areas or the edges of the tank as both areas are covered. The concave areas (bead rolled at factory to keep the tank skin from flexing) are covered by the big straps that hold the tank onto the back of the car. The edges are covered by chrome end caps. Had those areas not been covered I would have done two things differently. First, I would have prepped those areas to an extreme before I painted... like get them absolutely perfect.. Second, while I would have wet sanded those areas as normal, I would have cut/buffed by hand. Note that all the wet sanding I'm doing is by hand and you pretty quickly learn to feel and hear the surface finish that you're working on. You should always be using very minimal pressure as the goal is to let the grit on the paper to cut down the imperfections and it doesn't do that well if you're pushing down. The biggest thing I learned wet sanding is to start with (if needed) 800 grit and just get the "tops" of the imperfections cut off. Then with 1000 grit you get it almost flat. The pass with 1500 takes everything down further and get the surface dead flat, you'll do no more leveling at this point. The passes with 2000 and 3000 are light and fast. Also.. more direct to your point, I put masking tape over areas that I feared sanding through and just didn't touch them at all. I tried doing an edge or two in the beginning and sanded through them almost instantly. Any sharp edge is going to be a huge challenge. I changed how I did filler and how I shot paint on the edges to account for that. If you haven't painted before, and I can't stress this enough, you should do one panel all the way through to the finish to get a feel for the challenges. It will change the way you do body work, filler, block sanding, prep, painting, etc. Also understand you're going to get a lot better by the time you finish the car... and want to do parts from the beginning over. That's not a problem, I re-cleared the tub and a couple of other panels.
    2 points
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