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  1. And I suppose all of them with 4 doors, and available mostly in black, white, and shades of gray. I agree that the electrical-vehicle topic has been discussed to death, and there's no need to continue it. We can simply look up a past thread. Meanwhile, I'll be enjoying my Cadillacs from the time when they were colorful, powerful, and desirable!
    8 points
  2. Get out the dead horse, it’s time to start beating him again. This topic has been discussed so many times and the for or against EV groups have made their points so many times I’m not sure what’s left to discuss. Unless you have been on Mars for the last 20 years this is old news. Today is Earth Day so expect more info like this to be in the news today and most of the week.
    7 points
  3. My neighbor texted me today and said some of my parts had come back from the plater. I figured it would be the inside door parts for the 34’ chevy pickup I’ve been working on. The two inside latch pulls came in but so did the stem covers. Before my neighbor polished them up and sent them for plating, I used his 1/8” letter punch set to monogram both Joe Pirrone’s set and mine. Joe’s got a “JP” and mine got a simple “B”. One more item off the judges list. Now to mount them on my car.
    7 points
  4. This is Ron Mooney's 1969 Buick Electra Convertible. Ron affectionately referred to his car as "Biggest Red". Ron's wife would like to sell the car to a Buick enthusiast who would appreciate this car. Ron bought this car about 15 years ago in East Williston Long Island. As far as I know, it is all or mostly original. I remember Ron taking this car to his best body guy for some minor cosmetic paint work. It is a looker. It runs and rides great. There are 114,000 miles on the original 430. Ron regularly drove this car before his passing in December of 2019. It has been garaged since then. The car is located in Pawleys Island, South Carolina. Pawleys Island is about 30 miles south of Myrtle Beach. I'll post an e mail for Josephine Mooney in case anyone would like to contact her to see the car. Her e mail is jozeymoze@gmail.com. Asking price is 18,000.00 Any questions can be posted here. I asked Josephine to look for any paperwork Ron may have had for the car. This is a nice car as you will see in the pictures.
    6 points
  5. When driving your collector car always calculate SMILES per gallon
    6 points
  6. When he vanished, many people were upset over the political crap floating around here. Some even threatened to leave. I am among the majority saying good riddance to the bickering , and am very grateful for the moderators placing a zero tolerance policy to it. Absolutely no good whatsoever could have come from continuing divisive irrelevant off subject B.S. here, and it could have got very much worse. Now that we are cleansed, I wish we could issue him an apology and get him to come back, if in fact that was the issue. - Carl
    6 points
  7. Hood Latch Handle Replacement This is probably not something that people will commonly have to deal with, but I figured I would tell my story here just in case someone else has the same problem. The passenger side hood latch handle on my car has been funky since I bought the car. It just never wanted to close all the way. I figured (mistakenly as you will learn) that this was due to the poor alignment of the front end sheet metal on my car. There's a gap between the hood and the fender on that side. Anyway, I became accustomed to the fact that you had to give the handle a sharp hit with the palm of your hand to get it to "retract" all the way when you opened and closed the hood from the right side. About six weeks ago, the problem got a lot worse. The handle didn't want to fit properly into the "grill" where it is situated, even with the sharp hit. A few weeks later, I gave it a hit and -- oops! -- the pot metal handle broke. I went on Ebay and immediately found a replacement for $95, not bad. On the '41, the hood release handles are recessed into a kind of "grill" on the side of the fender under the hood (the precursor of the "portholes" that came in '49). I figured out how to remove the "grill," but found that what was left of the broken handle was attached by a pin to a housing within the "grill" that was also made of pot metal. Given the fragile nature of pot metal, I was concerned about trying to drive this pin out with a hammer and punch. I turned to my friend and mentor Don Micheletti who confirmed my concerns, saying "that has 'break me' written all over it." We arranged a time for me to bring the assembly down to Don's shop where, he assured me, he would find a way to get the pin out and install the "new" handle. He told me the old pin might have to be drilled out, and he would make a new pin. In the meantime, I wanted to repaint the black "surround" to the SUPER letters on the new handle I had purchased. Judging from the chrome plating on the the new handle, it didn't look like it had ever been in a car. But the black paint was in bad shape and it had some pitting in the pot metal. I am only including this portion because several people on the forum have said that they have had trouble repainting the black areas on various chrome pieces. I'm no artist, but I have a method that seems easy and achieves quite a satisfactory result. First, I stripped off the remaining black paint with lacquer thinner. Then I liberally applied black paint (I use Rustoleum satin black enamel). I let it dry for about 30 minutes, and then take a piece of plastic (I find that an old credit card or hotel "key card" works well), wrap it with a paper towel soaked in mineral spirits, and carefully run it over the painted area. The result may not be "Pebble Beach" quality, but I think it's quite presentable for my "driver level" standard. After that, let the paint cure completely and then follow up to carefully remove any other traces of black in the wrong places. Next, I took everything down to Don's shop for the next step. After giving the pin a few taps with a punch, Don decided that it was rusted in place and would have to be drilled out. He then figured a way to secure the very irregularly shaped "grill" piece on his milling machine, and got to work drilling out the old pin. I was particularly impressed with the various devices that Don had at his disposal to stabilize the piece and keep it from "walking" while the pin was drilled out. (As someone who has very little experience dealing with this level of machinery, I have to say that I view Don's shop as a magical place where miraculous things take place!) After drilling out the pin from both sides, it was sufficiently weakened that the remains could easily be punched out. Then Don made a new pin out of brass. The new handle was then installed with the new pin. I then put it back on the car. However, this time I looked at the shop manual and found that the latch was actually adjustable! This adjustment should have been made years ago, but I figure previous owners (as well as myself) had been banging on that latch handle for years, eventually causing it to fail. I got it properly adjusted, and it now closes just the way it should. Happy ending!
    5 points
  8. Ms. Barra needs to start pushing improvements and upgrades to the country's electric infrastructure. An EV is useless without a reliable way to charge it.
    5 points
  9. I guess that’s nice but for me personally I will(baring unexpecteds) be 80 then and just can’t see the need to change over.
    5 points
  10. I don't really like switching the mill from vertical to horizontal but I have to admit that in horizontal mode it does a really superior job. I switched it over and set the tie rod end up to mill the slot. I'm using the two-piece vice so that the pressure from the milling cutter will be against the face of the vice and took a few cuts. I'm very pleased with the finish on the surface. I've never gotten such a smooth finish from a spinning end mill. I did take rather small cuts - the real machinists out there would say I did the entire thing with finishing cuts but. as I've said before, time is the one thing I have an abundance of...and I would rather not do it over because I rushed the job. Then I used a barrel lap to fit the bolt to the bushings. It came out as good as I could have hoped for so tomorrow I'll do the other one. I'm also going to mill the spring shackles I managed to wreck a few months ago. I've already prepared the pieces and had a special cutter ground for them but was waiting until I had the mill in horizontal mode.
    5 points
  11. You like this one, how about mine. Took me 13 yrs. piece meal.
    4 points
  12. First, If Tin Indian and Pete wanted us to know they would have said so. Many of you are assuming and speculating and this is not good. Second, almost everything today is political in nature and that includes what effects us in the collector car world such as what is in the fuel and how it effects our engines, the price and availability of fuel, the type of paint we can use, road taxes, emission regulations on collector cars that are newer and are still in the system-some forever, and how it effects our wallets, to a pandemic that effects our car shows. If we are to talk about the really important general well being of the hobby then politics has to be in the picture. If not we may not have a future. Legislators and lobbyist have a direct impact on us and the both of them are highly political. You must know there are some people, organizations that want our cars off the road. If you put you're heads in the sand you might not realize that what's going on above you - that you are being buried altogether.
    4 points
  13. We already have enough issues with 'peak electrical loads' being exceeded during certain times of the day when its extremely hot, or extremely cold outside, and get nicely asked to turn down our a/c units, or use our appliances at different times of the day by the utility company when it occurs. Imagine what's going to happen when the entire nation's vehicles go electric. Craig
    4 points
  14. Being as it is on E-Bay probably to ask less would get you ignored. You all know how prices start there. And as usual, if the clutch is an easy fix, do so.
    4 points
  15. The 'year of manufacture' plates on my blue/white 55 were less than pristine. The front had 30 years of dents, bends, chips and gouges; the rear was wearing thin. Here is one plate already stripped, media blasted, some straightening and etching primer; the other shows wear That original paint was really tough. Media blasting and wire wheel were getting me nowhere. So I slathered it with Citristrip Paint & Varnish Stripping Gel and wrapped in foil for a few hours. The bare metal had some original rusty finger prints. Background color applied. That was a very rare and obscure shade of yellow (school bus yellow) Vinyl graphics applied The rear plate could be used as is, but the front needs to be more durable. I am thinking clear coat or a license plate cover. I have some scrap graphics on the back side to test clear coat (I sure don't want to start over if the clear coat screws up the graphics.
    3 points
  16. Not mine, regrettably... thoughts on whether stock original or older restoration. https://losangeles.craigslist.org/sgv/cto/d/west-covina-vintage-buick/7308437775.html 1938 buick special coupe, straight 8 runs, good brakes solid car for a 38. Interior is in great shape, jump seats in back. Has all trim, no cracks on glass all roll up. Newer gas tank, newer wide white tires (Coker). Og woodgrain dash, will make a great custom, og bomb, just leave stock. Asking $18,000 Obo.
    3 points
  17. First off -- I don't know what the price should be on this convert, but I thought that it nice enough looking that some of you would enjoy taking a look. It's interesting how removing the roof from view shows off the body lines. It's done in quite tasteful and restrained colors, isn't it? It's for sale on Facebook in Florida. If you don't have F/B I don't know what you do to see it. Marketplace - 1948 Nash Ambassador · Custom | Facebook
    3 points
  18. Gas mileage in the single digits was not out of the question for one of those. Big, heavy car, massive straight eight engine, one speed Dynaflow transmission with slippy torque converter. On the hiway at a steady 50MPH might be good for 12MPG or a little more but in traffic 8 - 10 would be typical. You could change to synthetic oil, tune up the engine, pump up the tires but it's never going to get great mileage especially on the watered down slop they sell for gas these days.
    3 points
  19. This has been one of those days where I got a fair amount done but it doesn't show... I milled the slot and fit the bolt in the other tie rod end. This photo does a reasonable job of showing what a nice finish the horizontal mill and a sharp cutter gives. I've done nothing to those inside surfaces except blow the chips off. Because the mill is set up for it, I went back to the spring shackles I started earlier. I had a stagger-tooth cutter ground with a 3/16 chamfer on the edge for this job. It's slow going, partly because the mill itself is worn. If I take too aggressive a cut the table vibrates. It isn't often a problem and re-scraping the ways would be a massive job - which I can't say I even know how to do - so it's prudent to take my time. It is giving me the same quality of finish I got with the tie rod ends. I'm off tomorrow to install the Cadillac water pumps and keeping my fingers crossed that they work correctly!
    3 points
  20. Maannn! You don't need no stinkin' EV charging infrastructure. Just mandate that every new house, condo, apartment, etc., built be required to install one of these. Charging problems solved!
    3 points
  21. I count smiles per mile because it's a more manageable number!
    3 points
  22. I imagine someone said something similar when gas vehicles first hit the roads and started catching fire. Up to that point no one had saw a horse catch fire when it ran off the road. We have to prepare for the future and it appears electric vehicles are going to be what our grandchildren will be driving. It only makes sense that we start making changes now to ensure their safety in the future.
    3 points
  23. Given that Cadillac produced a different body that WAS a limousine, it still isn't proper to call a standard 5-passenger sedan a "limousine." Just because there's a definition that can be loosely fitted to any large 4-door sedan doesn't make it a limousine. It's a common mistake given the car's size, but really wanting something to be true and it actually being true are two different things. Seller seems to be mistaking the number of windows for the type of body it's carrying--limousines were about 7 inches longer with the aforementioned divider window. Club sedans were on the same chassis but had a close-coupled 4-door body. The standard 5-passenger sedan has three windows but a shorter body than the limousine and 7-passenger sedans, despite sitting on the same chassis. You can usually see the extra length in the quarter windows. My '29, for instance, has a filler panel between the body and the trunk rack that would not be there on a limousine because the body itself is longer. It's also quixotic to call it a limousine, since limousines are typically the LEAST valuable of the closed cars. The 5-passenger sedan is probably second only to the club sedan in terms of values of 4-door closed cars. They would do well to advertise this car properly rather than trying to hype it into something that enthusiasts don't actually care about. 5P sedan: Limousine: Note where the body ends in relation to the rear wheel, the size of the rear window, as well as where the trunk is mounted. Both are on the same chassis and wheelbase, the limousine body is simply a little longer. You can also see why I never installed my trunk.
    3 points
  24. THE CAR SOLD IN LESS THAN 24 HOURS... when priced below actual value... they go quickly. Hopefully to be driven as is, and not hot rodded...
    3 points
  25. This is why the AACA Forums are so important, where can you get sage advice ( most of the time!) as to who, what, where to go to get help or repairs. All from the seat of the chair in front of your computer. AND most of what is said here ( with a few exceptions from arm chair mechanics - I will not mention names ) is from people who got their finger nails dirty actually doing the work! Or from people who can tell you where to get the parts or can supply them .
    3 points
  26. Glenn, thanks a lot for bringing back the stuff that nightmares were made of for me back in the day....the dreaded Comfortron! Yes, it drove those of us working for Olds Div and those working in the dealerships nuts. The first air bag cars added to my misery especially since I had no training on them and was expected to know what to do. Sorry, to digress. Daniela, you got some good advice. Charlotte is filled with good shops and has a very active AACA Region in the Hornets nest. As to Jasper, this forum prefers no bashing of businesses but the use of a personal message (PM) if someone wants to leave negative feedback. Jasper has been around a long, long time and my former business used them from time to time with no complaints. Have no idea about their custom rebuilds.
    3 points
  27. Wow, talk about 10 lbs of poop in a 5 lb bag, there a lot of stuff in a small area Roger that transmission is really turning out amazing
    3 points
  28. Ron’s been busy making parts again. 👍👌 New crank hole cover for Terry Making wind screen post rubber gasket for a D B 2249 Senior Phaeton,( Tourer in Ozz) Edges chamfered Bottom of block ground to shape of the cowl All of this was done on this gizzmo All finished Now to Post them off the Anthony akka gundog I experimented with recessing the second one by using the milling machine Worked great much more control over the Dremil Hole cut with hole saw marked and recessed with a Dremil
    3 points
  29. Thanks Alex for the details about the shield and mud pan shelf. Tanks to your comments, I now realize why the 1933 frame/engine in Germany had no freewheeling: it was no more available. Indeed, this info is in the shop manual; I did not saw it until this morning! Randy: why 1:6? it's 1:12! You are right, all those tiny parts will be a nightmare to reproduce. However, when I'm looking at each individual piece, it may not be that bad. I have anyway an advantage: they must not be functional. I assume that this complex affair was not because the engineers wanted to make things complicated just for the fun of it: it was necessary to have them that way because all was mechanical. When I will do the linkage for the brakes, I will explain why there is a slot here or there. The fact that the handbrake is actuating the same rods as the service brake without actuating the front brakes was requiring some tricks. They will be explained in due time. Most probably all the vehicles with pure mechanical brakes had a similar arrangement. Things were much simplified with the arrival of hydraulic brakes, which I could not reproduce in that scale!
    3 points
  30. Restorers should research the colors offered rather than rely on artists' conceptions in company advertising. I used to see at a local concours a 1930 Packard 733 touring in three shades of purple displayed with a framed magazine ad (painting) showing the same body style in the same colors--but none of my Packard friends thought anything ever left the factory looking like that.
    3 points
  31. Glenn, yes Comfortron--had trouble remembering the name while writing that post. The Suction Throttling Valve (STV) was the biggest PIA. And if memory serves, I had to disconnect the right hand hood hinge and block the hood in a precarious position to change the damned thing. 1964 was indeed the first year of Comfortron for Cadillac, and I *think* Cad was the only GM brand to have it. Sounded great on paper, turning a dial to the desired temp, but in practice, not so much... Mine was a 33k-mile 60S when acquired. Lost a core plug (1-15/32 if memory serves) completely--it fell out--on the right side of the block at 70 mph on the Atlanta Beltway, found it quickly enough. Rolled into a gas station at the end of the exit ramp, and they let me use their whole-front-end lift jack. Quickly disconnected the battery, as the insulation had melted on the portion running between the exhaust manifold and the block. Took 2-1/2 hrs to cool enough for me to change it. Removed RF wheel and inner fender panel for easy access to the site. Prayed like never before (well, since Vietnam, anyway) that I hadn't cracked block or head, because at the time I lived in Towson MD, just north of Baltimore, a l-o-n-g way away. When refilling with water (only, till I found out whether something was cracked), I had to keep hosing the core between attempts to refill. Had tools with me, and the station got me the core plug for a $5 fetch-it charge. And, of course, put a lot of electrical tape on the battery cable! No cracks--got home and pressure-tested and combustion-leak-detected with perfect results. And I drove the car another 60k miles without ever pulling the heads or otherwise going into the engine. This is about as lucky as I've ever been with a mishap on the road. And it's a great testament to the durability of those engines.
    3 points
  32. I have written multiple versions of such a list. That might be a good and interesting thread topic.
    3 points
  33. Yes, of course. That's called a Turbo Plug, and it adds 5 HP!
    3 points
  34. Hectic day!! Was in the attic trying to help the tech hardwire some security cameras when my glass man decided to show up and work in the car. I been waiting for him for at least three months. This while my neighbor called about a suspicious man walking back and forth in front of their house who turned out to be an Amazon delivery man that was bitten by their dog while trying to deliver a package. The man had a laceration in his hand and have to attend to him. Right after the police took a report and the man carried away to the outpatient center a Jeep comes by and asked me if I knew the owner of a dog that was following him. The dog, no relation to my neighbor’s dog that had bitten the delivery man, was a Pitbull which are banned in the county. The Pitbull looked non aggressive, lost and exhausted. Had to attend to the dog while the Jeep driver told me that he had to go and took off. The dog was taken to the Vet by my neighbor and was scanned finding the owner who lived few blocks away. In the meantime my glass man was partially installing the new vents and told me he had to come back another day. No end in sight. Took some pictures of the progress which I’m sharing here. The security camera installer was still solo in the attic and said he would come back tomorrow. As of this time, I still don’t know if the Pitbull was picked up by the owner. talk about unfinished jobs!!!
    3 points
  35. Charlotte, N C area !!!??? You've got Nascar Shops and Great Automotive shops all over the area !!!! My friend is Penske Motor Sports' Vice President --- I am sure he would know THE right place to bring it ...... I can supply you with all U.S.A. made parts for a 429 Caddy Motor, also --- Rings, Rods, Mains, Pistons, Camshaft, Rocker Arms, Valve Lifters, Intake and Exhaust Valves, Guides, and Keepers, etc. , etc... I am at the Carlisle car show , here in Pennsylvania, this week, but I (might) be able to answer you this week in the evening (like now,) Or after the week, of course.... Yours, Craig......
    3 points
  36. The brace from the L bracket is something I added to belter support the heat shield. There is a mud pan on each side of the engine which I do not have that is attached to the heat shield. Here is some pictures from the authenticity manual. Heat shield ^ 1931^ 1932 mud pan. V16 should be longer.^
    3 points
  37. Peter, Didn't see where we could give you a "like" for that post. So here's a big - for it, & for a good job.
    3 points
  38. Should I say: thanks Alex! or: that's not fair to show this arrangement! Anyway, now things are clear: the brake booster is attached at the point I'm aware of and the clutch assist is installed much higher. I have good pictures from the clutch assist from a V-8 car car, if I don't know what to do, I can add it! I will first do the brake assist system, then we'll see! On your pictures, I see a shield to protect the brake and clutch system from the exhaust heat. This shield was not present on the chassis in Germany, but it makes sense. Now, I understand the usage from this small bracket shaped as a "L" attached to the transmission. The whole set-up is making a very busy place near the transmission! Thanks to your third picture, I have a nice view from under of the support for the pedals. What I did is not too far away! You are correct, V-8 cars had no brake assistance.
    3 points
  39. Looks great as usual Roger. Just to make things a little more complex for you, here is a couple pictures of the Clutch and brake assist boosters from a V12 car. The clutch assist is part of the freewheeling. I do not believe the V8 Cars had brake assist boosters. top view bottom view view from under
    3 points
  40. That tiny stupid support for the pedals took me a long time to understand its general shape! Finally, I got it more or less right; I hope that the position of the pedal's shaft is not too far away from the reality. When I did the pictures from that frame and engine, the free-wheeling system was removed or was never installed as I don't know if it was standard or optional. As the bracket is the same for all V-12 and V-16 engines, "my" bracket has the provisions to install the valving (there are the tiny holes flanking the shaft), but will stay that way. Anyway, as I have pictures from a 1932 V-8 equipped with that system, I'm wondering how both boosters could be attached to the frame; I have the impression that there is not enough space. I did also the 4 "yoke adjusting quadrants" and temporarily installed them. It was wise: I noticed that the screw behind the hand brake lever was interfering with the lever. I made it thinner in that location and reduced the height of the bold attaching that quadrant. The next goal? The gear shift. Aa ACCA forum member gave me its length (another dimension I skipped when I could have measure it) and it's time for it. Most all my brass parts are silver soldered. For years, I had Castolin 1802 rods in 1 mm or 1.5 mm diameter. That specific solder is no more available because it contains cadmium. The manufacturer is now selling the Castolin 1800 which is cadmium free, but has a higher content of silver. The temperature needed is almost the same, so I can do the switch. There is just one problem: nobody is selling those rods by the piece as it was the case years ago. The minimum quantity is 1/2 kg for about $ 650.00. Finally, I gave up with my researches and ordered that minimum quantity. I will probably have silver soldering material for the next 100 years! Anyway, a local jeweler is interested to buy some quantity from that material, but I don't know how many rods...
    3 points
  41. I kinda agree Mike. If it is indeed solid and in original condition I'd love to own it, leave pretty much as is. edit) but I don't see how that interior could be original, do y'all
    2 points
  42. More here, among other places: https://www.hagerty.com/media/automotive-history/parallel-parking-made-easy-1930s-style/ The issued patent for the invention is here: https://www.freepatentsonline.com/2139341.pdf
    2 points
  43. Correct. But it is an odball 390, shares some aspects of the 429 which came out in ‘64. Pay particular attention to the oil pump. Incorporate any upgrades available. Cadillac and LaSalle Club, (which you should join soon - I believe free trial memberships are available), forums would have the info you need. - Cadillac Carl
    2 points
  44. Is this supposed to be here?
    2 points
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