Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/10/2021 in all areas

  1. Well.......... I posted this about 7 months ago. It has been a desire of mine for years to have an experience with a Classic. Kids, jobs, commitments.....just the busy nature of life, all had me thinking and looking.... and not pulling the trigger. I had and still have so much to learn about this era. The point of the thread I started was to get information about the changes through the years related to looks and engineering. I tried to articulate and explain that I like the looks of all the cars of that era, but that my eye does prefer that earlier look of the late 20's/early 30's, and that for cost reasons I wanted my first experience to be a closed car. In going with those years, I realize that they won't drive like a later 30's Classic (which I do appreciate and love the looks of many). I have had a blast looking, learning, reading, about so many options. In the end, I think the solution is that you need two to be the best of both worlds......something earlier for the look I prefer, and something later for mechanical, touring, maintenance attributes. I don't see me doing a lot of Touring (multiple days in a row out of town distant from home) until I retire. Time away from work is precious and I have a big family that most of that time needs to be dedicated to until I've stopped working. So a later 30's touring car will hopefully be in my future and I have lots of ideas about what might be my favorite target when that time comes. I got so much help and advice, through the thread and conversations offline. This is a great community. Ed contacted me within minutes of my first post and I have really enjoyed getting to know him, Guys on here with so much more knowledge and expertise in this area commented on the thread and shared their thoughts. That got me to know their names and follow their comments in other threads (Ed, Matt, West, AJ, Walt, John M, Steve, .........so many others....it is dangerous to name names because I'll leave people out and I'm grateful for all the input). lots of suggestions about cars that weren't even on my radar but I loved learning about them. I bought a 733 Club Sedan, I was in conversation with the seller six months ago, and we stayed in touch about once a month and he reached out to me about a month ago and said "make me an offer", he is retiring out west, to be near his son and wants to tidy up his life before leaving the east coast and selling his home. Although I had pictures from the initial contact (and had spent hours studying them), I hadn't seen the car. I flew out about a 3 weeks ago and spent the day with him and the car and bought it. The car arrived Monday. It is dirty and I hope to spend the weekend doing lots of cleaning and getting my initial plan together for moving forward with the car. I have a couple of close friends (with lots of experience in this type of car and systems) who have been involved in my decision to pull the trigger and they will be a great resource as I tackle different problems (Thanks in advance Tom W). I hope to start a new thread in the projects area as I sort through things and continue to learn and get advice from many of you.
    7 points
  2. Well........we ALL make mistakes........don't we? 🤔 No worries......still time for him to get a Pierce!😝
    6 points
  3. Here is the update on the car. I discovered some of the drivability problems that seemed to be related to fuel. I pulled the carburetor and sure enough the float was defective and had sunk. No wonder it was running rich. A re-rebuilt carburetor later and presto, the car ran great. Problem solved. Tuesday, I drove the car to work then picked up my girls at home for a daddy daughter ride. My youngest (9) promptly announced this is her favorite car in our small collection. Naturally, on cue, the car immediately sputtered and died. Again. So now what? Several people have described similar events with similar cars, always pointing to the coil. I went ahead and ordered a new one and installed it tonight. Right now the car will fire and run. I'm going to get it hot again and have my oldest follow me around the neighborhood tomorrow in his truck and we'll see how long it will run. An important piece of information is the car now has a Pettonics ignition system that replaced the original point and condenser system. Candidly, I'm not sold and if a couple test miles fail I intend to switch back to the original system As I mentioned in another thread here, it sure looks great.
    6 points
  4. A few more pictures, thanks for the nice feedback. I had time on monday to pull the car off the trailer into the garage and then went right into a very busy four days. TGIF......putting on the coffee pot, some motivating music and going to start cleaning.
    6 points
  5. The other day I had the Electra out for a drive and then a trip to the reservation for cheaper gas. Premium is less costly than regular is in town, and it gives the car a good run. Between one thing and another about 70 miles on it. It was running a bit rough at the start, but much nicer after it got some fresh gas in it. I always put stabilizer in everything, but the gas still goes a bit stale. Then the next day a few errands in the Reatta, no pics, sorry folks! Not as much driving on that, about 20 miles or so.
    5 points
  6. 5 points
  7. It’s amazing how a person with skills, knowledge, ability and willingness to just be a good kind person can make your day! Ed is that person for me. He said it was electrical before he even knew I had replaced everything. He did not think it was a fuel problem but had me check that out as some others had suggested just to be safe. When nothing worked he wanted to test the coil and distributor. The new coil is junk. I told the girls the beast will be up and running shortly and we can then go for their daily rides again. If they see Ed I’m sure he will be covered with doodle dust from them jumping all over him! I want to thank everyone that tried to help me get this problem solved. TerryB, Bloo, Frank, Padgett, John and others I’m forgetting and of course Ed. Also a special Thanks to Peter for allowing this thread to stay on the general forum instead of moving it to the Studebaker forum. Based on the number of responses and views I think it has been of interest to a lot of members. Thanks Ed, you are a very appreciated man and I wish there was a better way to say that and show you how much respect you deserve for being such a kind, giving individual. dave s
    4 points
  8. Fred will you have a display at the Canfield spring swap meet? thanks Bob Staehle Thanks for asking Bob. Yes we will have our usual display at the Canfield, Ohio Spring Swap Meet on April 30-May 2nd, plus our annual spring showroom sale from April 27-May 2nd. Our manufacturing plant, showroom and car museum are located only one mile from the Canfield Fairgrounds. We will also display at the Canfield Spring and Fall Shows -all at Spaces 482-485. For those who do not know, all of our Skat Blast abrasive blasting cabinets and HVLP paint spray systems are manufactured in our Canfield location. All are proudly Made in USA out of USA steel by USA employees. Had you purchased one of our first cabinets back in 1978 and needed parts, they are in stock for immediate shipment. That is one of the many advantages of buying USA made products. Fred
    4 points
  9. I found some interesting history on Project 66R. I purchased the car in 1995 from a guy that purchased it from the original owner. He had not put the car in his name. The title still had the original owner info on it. (I looked at the car while we were on vacation) I made him an offer and he did not accept it. One month later he calls and accepted my offer. I had it hauled home to my place of work. I had written a letter to the original owner using the address on the title. It was some time before I received a letter back. (I attached a copy of the letter) I was hoping to get some original family photos of the car when it was new. I never heard back from her. I was looking for something else in the Buick file and found the letter. I decided to search Facebook for relatives of this couple. I typed in his name and a Jerry Tolve came up and he lived in Denver Co. He had others in his group with the same last name. I sent him a message and asked him if he may be related to this couple. He responded that he was. It was his grandfather’s brother! There is still hope!!!!
    4 points
  10. For Sale 1985 Buick Riviera T-type(4EY57), one of 1069 produced, LM9 turbo standard. One owner, meticulously maintained, white with tan interior, no issues, extra parts, BCA Archival award. 60,000 miles. Located near Flint, Michigan. Serious inquiries only, please! To be shown by original owner by appointment only. $20,000 please email me at buickracer@comcast.net for more info or to schedule an appointment. Thank you.
    3 points
  11. For sale on Facebook: 1968 Buick Electra Convertible in Milwaukee, WI - $19,500 - Must be a member of Facebook to access Seller's contact information. Link: https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/item/753712245330398/ Seller's Description: 1968 Buick Electra Convertible Very good condition Driven 121,000 miles Automatic transmission Exterior color: Brown · Interior color: Tan Runs down the road perfectly. New battery, tires, rear end w/new bearings, brake cylinders, shoes, front end redone by Frame and Alignment. Trans serviced. All original w/ 1 repaint. Some chips and scratches in the paint. I will get more pics later. PLEASE, do not email, text, send ANY OFFERS without seeing car. I won't respond. Phone calls preferred, [hidden information]. But Facebook doesn't post numbers in original ad. If you message me with your phone number I'll know you're interested.
    3 points
  12. I have a friend who has been blind since birth. Really an amazing guy who has led quite a productive life, very computer/tech literate, and so on. His wife is blind too - so they've never "seen" each other. I've often wondered what his reactions would be if he were to suddenly have vision. (She is decent looking, so he'd be happy about that!) "A phone with a camera" is the wrong way to look at it. They are really handheld computers with a phone app.
    3 points
  13. About 30 years ago a friend's mother died at close to 100 years old. The mother had outlived all her friends, so it was a small group at the' graveside service. Son & daughter in law, a granddaughter and a old neighbor of the deceased. They had hired a preacher to come and say a few words, and he never appeared. The son was trying to figure out what to do, when I said, I can do it. (Me not being a religious man the son said, "are you sure?) I spoke of what she had witnessed in her long lifetime, like the rise of the automobile, airplanes, the plague of 1918, 2 World Wars, Polio Vaccine, marriage, Birth of Children & grand children, Man on the Moon, etc, etc.. No fire & brimstone, just the fact that she lived through a lot of history and in spite of all that she had a nice life. A talk I've used a few times since then.
    3 points
  14. Do they always get stuck in the same position?
    3 points
  15. This week was a busy week. As usual not hands-on in the shop but on the design end which I don't mind and enjoy when it can allow for some creativity. or includes a nice challenge. With spring now finally here (the ice went out on the river last week) I had to turn attention to up-coming construction projects. As mention in an earlier post we have been working on a dedicated road to operate the museum's collection of log haulers and will greatly expand our capabilities for living history events. An addition to the scope of the project is the inclusion of a pavilion to house our collection of logging sleds. Back a few years ago the students at the Presque Isle Regional Career & Technical Center built a set for us using a pile of old fittings that had been donated years before. To date we have had to store the sleds outside which is not optimal. With a presentation to the University of Maine, Construction Engineering Technology students looming earlier in the week, I had to hustle to finalize the design, finish the construction documents, develop a rendering for the pavilion and finalize the plan/profile etc. for the log hauler road. Below is the sled pavilion rendering. Next on the list was re-invigorating the fuel tank fitting project. We started this a few years back but for one reason or another it found itself stuck on back burner and then relegated to total stagnation. The other day I brushed it off and assigned it to one of my students who is now working to develop and 3D print the patterns and core boxes. All fun stuff!
    3 points
  16. AND THE ANSWER IS............BAD COIL, AND IT'S NEW! I STILL HAVE NOT CHECKED THE DISTRIBUTOR OR CARBURETOR....MORE TO COME.
    3 points
  17. I moved all the panels out, cleaned up the shop and put the paint booth up. I hope to get the inside of all the panels shot this weekend. I still need to clean the panels, put plastic down on the floor and, of course, bring the panels back in. Setting the booth up now goes pretty quick, I don't think it took more than a couple of hours to get everything in and put together. The previous sessions I had too much air velocity so I slowed the fan down by putting bigger and smaller pulleys on. I think it feels just about right now.
    3 points
  18. 3 points
  19. Here's the other photo. Their slacks are as long as the car.
    3 points
  20. Looks very nice. I haven’t driven a 733. It sure looks like you purchased a very presentable and drivable car. Take you time. Don’t be in a hurry. Fluids, lubrication, safety inspection, ect. Start with very short trips, and work your way up to sorting it to its optimal performance. Try and get a written history from the past owner ASAP.........photos, paperwork, Ext. History gets lost and forgotten quickly. Looking forward to more pictures and your learning curve on your first early 30’s Classic. When we meet in person, I’ll show you the secret handshake now that you have a car that qualifies as “heavy iron”. 👍
    3 points
  21. I started wiring the plugs for the headlights, realized I needed to connect the battery to test things out. I had never powered anything up before. Hoping that I didn't have any major short circuits, I connected the battery and tapped the horn button. Nothing! I started tracing wires, realized I had never connected the horn button to ground on one of the terminals. Once correctly wired, we had music - or at least a blast of the horn. Here's a video taken by my wife: https://youtu.be/T3xJ7Z1mvhM With that, I checked out the headlight assembly, tapped the starter button, tested the electric fuel pump, watched the dash lights come on and adjusted the dash light dimmer. Progress!
    3 points
  22. Just wanted to make it official with the Buick in front of the gate. Street view
    3 points
  23. At the end of the day Wednesday I set up this fixture to mill a radius on the ends I've been making. I actually made this for the spring shackles... About 20 minutes into milling I decided it wasn't going to work and I'd have to think of something else. While an idea was germinating, I took Thursday to paint over the graffiti "decorating" the back of the building the shop is in. It's a pointless waste of time because now the local "artists" will see a new, blank canvas. But, the insurance company threatened to cancel the policy on the building unless we sent them a picture of back of the building minus the decorations... I can't believe I got this done in a day...but I admit I wasn't making any effort to be especially neat or careful. I did think of a possible solution to my fixture problem and started on that this morning. It's actually very simple and relies on a big shoulder screw to hold the piece firm. I was skeptical that it would work but it seems to. When the first one was done I tried fitting it to the rear axle and discovered that the bracket is threaded on one side...so I chased the rust & dirt filled threads out... And slipped the new piece in. It seems fine... So I went on and did a second one. They aren't absolutely perfect but the flaws are so minor no one but me will notice and I'll forget them in a few weeks.
    3 points
  24. There are 10 types of computer folks. Those that understand binary Those who do not Jon.
    3 points
  25. Liberation tour in the Netherlands
    2 points
  26. We are at the point of “what’s next.?” I keep thinking my house should be a better source of heating and cooling data for more efficient energy use control and me regulating it from a tablet computer. Is there a new clean fuel just around the corner? Will sight and hearing come for those who can’t? Will people like me with a complete spinal cord injury find a way to get a working body? The flying cars, totally self driving cars, living on Mars and the list goes on. I never thought a phone with a camera in it would have much use, well I blew that one! Everything has room for improvement it seems, it just takes forward thinking people to figure out what to tackle next. The latest Mars exploration has demonstrated there are some very sharp people out there just waiting for the next challenge.
    2 points
  27. On July 4, 1921, at 2:30 in the afternoon, the flag dropped starting the 10th annual Tacoma Speedway Classic. Nine drivers had entered the 250 mile race. It was driven on Tacoma's infamous board track and had a purse of $25,000, to be divided nine ways. On the right is the pace car, a Marmon Speedster, carrying referee Eddie Rickenbacker and pace maker Ray Harroun. The car would pace the drivers for one lap before the race actually took off. Rickenbacker was a former star of the race track and a famous ace of the air and Harroun was also a veteran driver. Harroun was a last minute replacement for Louis Chevrolet. The car on the left of the pace car is #6, the Duesenberg driven by Roscoe Sarles. Sarles had earned the pole position by driving at the top speed of 101 mph during the trials. The race was won by favorite Tommy Milton. Milton broke all speed records for distance with his average speed of 98 mph.
    2 points
  28. If any of you here have not looked at the web site Terry just mentioned you really should, it is well presented and totally accurate so far as information an history goes. It is done by a good friend of Terry's and I who has an amazing collection of emblems and badges from around the world from all ages.
    2 points
  29. From the unusual and other forms of transportation category....
    2 points
  30. If you don’t get it....
    2 points
  31. Kerry & Bill, You saved me a lot of extra typing with your posts. I too have fitted California Car Covers for two of my cars. The first one my brother bought for me as a gift for being is Best Man at his wedding. Talk about a useful and thoughtful gift for a car guy. The 2nd I bought years ago at the Fall Hershey Flea Market. Got a very nice discount from the vendor. 4-6 weeks later (they are custom made) it arrived. Both covers have been in service for many years now. BTW Kerry, I think you and I both went to the same school for how to fold a car cover. 😁
    2 points
  32. I always get a kick out of car cover threads. I use a better grade indoor cover from California Car Covers (no affiliation). I am very happy with it. It is light and stretchy keeps the dust off my car. My car is never parked outside so I dont need a heavy all weather job. Cover is made to fit my car, 1977 Trans Am. I can easily put it on and take it off in a minute. I have a system down how I do so every time. I fold it towards the centre from each side then roll it from front to back. Ends up in a sleeping bag type roll when off, unrolls and folds down when installing. Pretty simple, but this is a low flat car. It cost about $250. This is where I find the humor. So many people will shy away from spending $200-$400 for a decent cover, to protect their $30k-$100k car with a $20k+ paint job! I bought a car cover in 1982 for my then brand new 1982 firebird from a company called Beverly Hills Motoring Accessories (believe they are long since out of business) that I am still using to cover my 79 t/a that is under restoration.
    2 points
  33. 2 points
  34. For some reason, 1969 and 1970 Electra convertibles are seen all the time; but other years, like this, much less so. This appears to be a very nice car, and the pricing isn't far off either. I even like the brown, since I like cars that offer something different. Fin Seeker, you keep the "Not Mine" cars an interesting topic! You and Mr. 58L essentially started an entire new active category on our forum.
    2 points
  35. I bought some but is it better than Kroil? Probably no way to objectively know outside a laboratory test but I'm a sucker for a potential solution to freeing rusted-stuck car parts. The bane of the hobby! I doubt I can free my rusty riser flap but it's stuck wide open so I will leave like that. Perhaps I can free the bolt on my trunk latch chrome!
    2 points
  36. There is a lot of truth there. The older I get, the more I want to enjoy a good driver, and the less I want a project that is hard to imposible to get parts for. As for the classics you seek, buy one that is a complete runner driver. With that said, Meeting a guy about a 1957 CJ3B Jeep tomorrow. It needs to be rescued. It's real crummy, but you can buy nearly anything you want fot it including complete body kits. Just can't stand seeing it rot into the ground as I drive by it often. It was parked in a barn 50 years ago and the barn fell on it. Oh lawdy, what a disease. Here I go again. Dandy Dave. Glad to see that you have found a good car. Dandy Dave!
    2 points
  37. Wonderful! I love it. It looks like a nice solid older restoration that needs to be refreshed, then driven and enjoyed for years to come. Congratulations!
    2 points
  38. It's imperfect, but in the end, the market speaks.
    2 points
  39. I am working on sorting out the Cadillac. The problem is when it gets hot it runs rough and dies. Everything I've read leads me to a coil problem. The other important peice of information is it has a Pettonics ignition system in it. I was not convinced wih these but allowed myself to be sold on them. One more rough running drive and I'm going to switch back to points and condenser and will see if it runs better. The car sure looks great though.
    2 points
  40. Hey Ed...you didn't offer to show me the secret handshake....I'm going to need to know that!
    2 points
  41. Excellent choice of cars. I'll be eagerly awaiting your updates.
    2 points
  42. What’s the difference between a pommy and a jet landing in Australia. The jet stops whining after it lands. 😂🤣 That excludes you to by the way Rich. we may as well throw windscreen in there also.
    2 points
  43. Used the GS for a few errands the last couple of days. The Happy Car just continues to be...Happy... Along the way I ran into the "Old Car Guy's" future
    2 points
  44. moving right along, just painted the body, hood and misc. parts and will wet sand the fenders and paint them in a couple days.
    2 points
  45. I see the front split at least. Definitely looks like a Retractable to me. 👍
    2 points
  46. I really hope by commenting on a previous response I'm not hijacking this thread, I guess I will be told. The Jaspanes emergence initially may have been the gas situation of the 70's, but it's not all of the answer. First was my experience with my wife's 1974 Toyota Corolla. When I first started dating her the car was new with about 10K miles on it. I looked at it as a disposable joke. The first time I got under it to change the oil I took my grease gun, but everything was prelubed and sealed. She didn't like my 1967 Camaro and told me so, and I opened up on her about here little piece of Japanese tin. I told her that my Camaro would still be on the road when "Puddle Jumper" was two thousand pounds of scrap. Was I ever wrong, by the time I quit driving it, that car had 275K miles on it and it was still running and driving, albeit with no hard valve seats left, in the aluminum, hemispherical head. I just got tired of having to adjust the valves every month. So what you got in the package was was unanticipated quality. At the same time some American manufacturers weren't doing as well. Second was our Datsun 240Z. We bought our's with about 100K miles on it, but anyone remember the waiting list when they came out? Well I do, and it wasn't because of gas mileage. It's an icon today. It just checked off all of the boxes in the day.
    2 points
  47. Billy, you are right. People have favorites, but they often don't realize that their words can hurt others' feelings. Here is an example from a past thread, on our own AACA forum, from a respectable member: "...as far as I'm concerned nothing from the 1980's or newer should qualify as anything but 'used cars.' " But we'll have to forgive people with such opinions. Many custom-bodied Classics languished as obsolete and undesirable on the back lots of the 1930's. To a friendly 101-year-old man I know, a 90-year-old might seem like one of the "little kids" from his old neighborhood. But I'll be happy to enjoy cars from the unwanted decades, reveling in their affordability. Here's my 1984 Buick Electra:
    2 points
×
×
  • Create New...