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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/06/2021 in Posts

  1. I didn't get as much done tonight as I'd hoped just because re-engineering my engine stand took longer than expected. I had to get the front cover off, which meant removing the front engine mounts, which meant removing the front stand that holds up half the engine. This V12 is much too long and heavy to be supported by one stand so I needed a support up front to take the place of that front stand. No problem, just some 2x4s to prop it up and keep it steady while I paint the block. Once that was in place, I removed the 22 nuts that hold the front cover in place then gently pried it away from the crankcase. It came off without much of a fight. There's a little spring-loaded button that holds the drive pulley for the generator in place, and that shot across the shop as I removed it, but I found the part and bagged it. I didn't expect that. Inside, the timing system is a work of art. Like everything on the bottom end of this engine, it's ridiculously over-built. Check out that massive three-row chain, the little oil galleys for each of the pulleys, the auto-tensioner on the idler, and the safety wire on the cam gear. I was led to believe there would be a fiber gear like on a Model A or V8 Ford, but these are all steel and in like-new condition. Nice! Holy cow, the timing assembly inside this Lincoln is ROBUST! I was concerned that maybe the timing chain would need to be replaced but now that I've seen it, I don't think so. There's about 3/4-inch of play in the chain but once there's oil pressure, the idler should take care of it. Looking closely at the chain and the cam gear, there's virtually zero wear, lending more credence to the idea that the engine was rebuilt a while ago but doesn't have a lot of miles on it. I'm glad I looked but I'm equally glad that I don't have to spend the $400-700 for a new timing chain. A little slack, but the idler uses oil pressure to keep it taut. It looks almost new. Gear teeth are in excellent shape with almost zero wear and nice, tight fit. Tomorrow I'll clean up the front cover in the blast cabinet and gather up another load of parts for the powdercoater's shop.
    9 points
  2. I just stumbled across this while trying to find the listing for the 1926 "Buick" from another thread - safe to say this guy has had enough of the 1% that really annoy the rest of us.... https://www.ebay.ca/itm/Cowl-shell-1924-27-Buick-1924-1925-1926-1927-GM-Hot-Rat-Rod/154387626737?hash=item23f2383af1:g:taYAAOSw9CdgWq5c 1%ers Disclaimer And no one percenters, no, I don't mean the rich 1% you hear about on the news, the other end of the spectrum 1%... What I mean is, 99% of eBayers are intelligent, reasonable, level headed, swap meet, flea market, estate sale, thrift shop, 2nd hand, trade show, antique mall, restoration, bargain hunting loving shoppers who appreciate the value as much as the hunt and the experience; while at the same time being able to artfully balance that with the realization that the item they are buying is used, old and may have idiosyncrasies to match, and they not only appreciate that, but embrace it as part of the items individual character and charm! The one percent, on the other hand, are the biggest cheapskates that can be, and yet they somehow think eBay is Macie's (or in the case of most the items I sell, the factory dealership), and after low balling you, will moan and cry about any and every real or perceived thing they can find because they do not have the discerning wisdom to read between the lines of the obvious reality in the listing, because every little thing has to be spelled out for them, and if its not they will accuse you as a seller of being dishonest because they don't have the intelligence to understand the unstated obvious. So...if you are a one percenter, this is for you. The item is as pictured and described, but it may be between 30 and 80+ years old and may look like the came out of Oscar the Grouches residence, being dusty/dirty, perhaps even having Charlotte's web inside, feasting on dead flies. They probably came from abandoned vehicles in ungodly locations, which means, they were left to the elements and rarely moved, so sun fading, wind chapping and who knows what else may have occurred. When they were moved, they were drug by chains and tow straps, or pushed by tractors(with a tire between them if they were careful) by tired dirty farmers who just wanted to get the vehicle out of their way. So by purchasing, the buyer acknowledges he has received pictures of all items, has seen they are rusty, dented, dinged, pitted, peeling, fading, cracking, torn, deteriorated, smelly, dirty, bug and web infested used parts off of old vehicles that were abandoned to the elements and may even have the afore mentioned damage/rust/etc. that may not have been visible as with personal inspection, however, buyer has inspected pictures to their satisfaction, calculated their fitment and application, and has negotiated prices on these parts. No returns, guarantees, warrantees, charge backs, or refunds have been expressed or implied. All said, the buyer realizes if I'm selling it, its nothing short of a miracle the item being purchased made it this far! Are we clear? So no whiners! Furthermore, I am not Sax 5th Ave, Nordstrom, Macie's, JC Penny's, Sears, Napa, Auto Zone, the local car dealership, or even Amezon (yep eBay is so fearful of Amezon now, that as a seller, I cant even mention the word Amezon spelled correctly or they will flag the listing, not allowing me to list it until changing it...so from hence forth, if I sell a necklace I got as a gift from an Amezon woman, when on an expedition in the Amezon Rain Forest, while canoeing down the Amezon River, in a canoe I got from a local Amezon resident who probably bought the canoe off Amezon...I will have to misspell it!! Really? eBay are you that afraid of Amezon that you have to banish the word from listings? Not even allowing the mere word to be mentioned!!!?? But back to my original rant...) which means your item will not come with a card, a bow, ribbon, tissue paper, pillow box, or even a new box...for your purchase, I will not be going to the UPS store to buy a new $4 box, I will be rummaging through the 20x20 room devoted to storing boxes upstairs in my metal grinding dirty, weld smoky, primer sanding dusty, paint overspray shop where I restore cars(and anything else I can find that is old and cool), the boxes will have been used to ship items at the very least once, but more than likely they will have been used so many times to ship that if they had frequent flier miles they would have earned a free trip around the world. Also, if its a corrugated box its fair game, which means the boxes may be old beer/wine/liquor boxes(from coping with the 1%ers), oil boxes, or from misc small appliances/tools; and may have been previously used to store parts, pack tools, or even as a temporary table to hold items during the primer/paint process of automotive restoration. Which means, if the boxes still somewhat resemble a rectangle, no matter their painted color, or previous use, they are fair game to ship your item. The same goes for packaging material, I will not be going to Upscale Mail to purchase new packing peanuts for $3, which means for packaging material you can expect, depending on the item shipped and my current packaging supply; old crumpled Harbor Freight tools ads, news paper, construction materials packaging, including but not limited to, cardboard, paper, plastic, plastic bags, old broken styrofoam from tool packaging, empty water bottles, my old sweaty T shirts, old insulation, straw bales, tumbleweeds, dandelion fluff, or anything else I deem acceptable by my discernment to reasonably get the item to you in one piece, through the shippers "drop ship" attitude. Now I proudly affront the 1%ers with the spirit of a puffed chested Weird Al Yankovic singing Superhero eBay Pooowwwweeerrrr Seelllleeerrrr! Fighting for reasonableness & discernment in purchasing old junque' for all! '(*_*)' ~~<(P)> _/ \_
    7 points
  3. HERSHEY! That's my favorite car based reality show. Come early and enjoy the swap meet too. Terry
    7 points
  4. The hand brake lever is looking a lot like a sculpture from the Swiss Giacometti, but has no value compared to his "marvels"! For the moment, there is just the profile from that lever and the lower part is far from finished: there will be a fork for the pawl. I will first doing the upper part and then the lower one. On the real car, this lever is about 20" tall from the axle to the end...Imagine that is a car from today!
    6 points
  5. This forum was never meant to replace local and national activities, but instead provide an alternate way to communicate with fellow hobbyists. COVID has escalated forum participation for no other than reason other activities have been limited. With our continued use of masks and social distancing, and more widespread distribution of the vaccine, local and national activities will be in full swing soon! I got my second COVID shot today. It gives me hope that activities will return soon that let us share our old cars in person and to interact with fellow hobbyists face-to-face.
    5 points
  6. To me total membership is somewhat less important than actual engaged participation. In almost every car club I'm actively involved with 20% of the members do 80% of the work anyway. I doubt very much my experience is vastly different from anyone else in that regard. There is a lot to be said for quality over quantity. That said, I'm always happy to see new faces getting involved!
    4 points
  7. Derham Body Co. of Rosemont, Pa. built this town car body on a Chrysler Chassis in 1937. Lower body structure below the belt line was Chrysler sedan and modifications were done above that and to the interior. With the Great Depression going on the demand for custom bodied luxury cars grew less , among one of the reasons was that the wealthy people who could afford a custom car did not want to be "in the face" of many who had no jobs nor enough to eat, so some cars were still being built for customers by Derham but were not as dramatic in appearance. Derham also became a dealership for Chrysler about 1937 so had a ready supply of chassis/cars that could be altered for customers, a good number of Chrysler 8 and 6 cylinder cars would see the factory bodies modified to give those cars a unique look . The last sales catalog Derham issued for custom cars was in 1967.
    4 points
  8. Finished the back of the seat where the hood attaches to. Seems to fit nicely and finishes of the back Started on the rear seat base. We’ll see how this goes , hopefully not in the bin.
    4 points
  9. This is the model of car that was driven by the odd family that lived down the street from you in 1957...a family that may have actually been...beings from another planet! Love these Nashes! The styling screams, "Take me to your leader!"
    4 points
  10. If we are talking about stuff you can find on the tube I really like Restoration Garage on Motor Trend TV. David Grainger is amazing, very car and restoration savvy, interesting to listen to and covers anything from putting some new trim in a Model A to ground up replication of a 1935 Bugatti Aerolithe. He owns a real world restoration shop called The Guild of Automotive Restorers in Bradford, Ontario Canada. He also is a farmer, has connections all over Europe, repairs antique watches and collects antique tractors and aircraft. You can check out his day job on his website here... https://www.guildclassiccars.com/1935-bugatti-aerolithe.php
    4 points
  11. Ran a few errands today. And saw a prime sign of Spring in this area
    4 points
  12. I have always said to use the 80/20 rule. 80% of the persons out there are reasonable, no problem. 20% want to complain no matter the circumstance. If you do anything for the 20%, 80% of the 20% will be satisfied or somewhat satisfied. It is the 20% of the 20% that no matter what you do they will always be unhappy and their mission in life is to make everyone around them and who they meet miserable and unhappy. That is the 4% of the population. Matt's statement that 1% is low. I concur.
    4 points
  13. Recently added Affordable EFi to my 51 Super convert. Starts and runs great, added aluminum radiator also. Will update as I put on some more miles.
    3 points
  14. Not my car. I was so overwhelmed by this Buick Super I had to pass it on. Check out the web site. Link below. 1954 Buick Super Riviera 322/236HP V8 2 Door Hardtop Stock # 4939 for sale near Torrance, CA | CA Buick Dealer (thewestcoastclassics.com)
    3 points
  15. Yes, Gateway doesn't have quite the ebay feedback rating it should and yes, this one could've been cleaned up a bit more for a few of the photos and had the spotlights removed, but these cars sure are pretty. The '67 has probably edged out the '63 as my favorite Galaxie in terms of looks. The hardtops are especially nice looking, but I like these convertibles, too, especially in these colors. From the ad: 1967 Ford Galaxie 500 XL | eBay "Gateway Classic Cars of Fort Lauderdale is pleased to offer another one to our fun in the sun category- a very pretty 1967 Ford Galaxie 500XL Convertible! Here's an affordable convertible you can drive and have fun with. Nice style, colors, and a more economical engine than those with the larger engine options. The light yellow exterior finish is very presentable, with a smooth shine and nice panel gaps. Ford did a great job on the styling on these, with the end result being a well-proportioned automobile with a sporty personality. The automatic top function works as it should. Brightwork also looks good, and a set of bias ply whitewall tires finishes it off for that vintage look. Although not perfect, it is an affordable vehicle that can certainly be enjoyed as it is, or made as nice as you desire. The spacious black vinyl interior features bucket seats and console, and still looks very good. Drop the top, and hit the beach! There's plenty of room inside, and in the massive trunk. Power steering and power brakes make it very easy to drive. The 289 V8 fires right up and runs well, and the 3-speed automatic does the job making it a smooth, fun car to cruise the streets. It's a looker, for sure! Recent service includes new mufflers, new brake booster & master cylinder, rebuilt carburetor, and shocks."
    3 points
  16. That is a disservice to CL lawn mower ads.
    3 points
  17. A few accessories visible on this '28 Packard six (5-33) sedan.
    3 points
  18. Bill, Yes indeed. This Cadillac has the Derham script badge emblem that was starting to be used by them in about 1941. If you look on the photo of the 1937 town car I posted just in front of the lower front door bottom hinge you will see a small triangle shield shape. That was the Derham badge in use just about from the teens up until 1941. Leather roofs - yes I recall the installation on the 1931 Franklin victoria very well, the upholsterer had a devil of a time trying to get hides large enough to do the job without a lot of seams being placed where they weren't originally. If you get a leather roof soaking wet with rain for an extended period of time ( like a 4 plus hour session driving from long island to the center of NY State for a Franklin Club meet) the leather roof swells, stretches and gets a lot of sags. First time I saw that I almost passed out! But the sags go away once it drys out. Like some of the people who read this and contribute we have had decades of just about every kind of experience with the pre war cars and some are very unique just to custom built ones. I never owned or restored a car that I then didn't drive for tens of thousands of miles after it was done- every mile I drove it made me think 'this is what all the $, time and effort spent was all about' - going down the road in a car with running boards and headlamps mounted on a bar between the front fenders. Walt
    3 points
  19. if it's any help, the wheel opening mouldings are the same for both. they used to install them just down the line from me at the GM plant in 1965.
    3 points
  20. The dual spotlights need to go! Nice car with good lines and complimentary color scheme.
    3 points
  21. Thankfully, the new Jay Leno video linked above fills the void. He shows how it operates and takes it on the road. Isn't it great when inactive cars, especially rare ones, are lovingly cared for and brought back into activity?
    3 points
  22. LOL.. Yep. But bonnie was cute. This one wore combat boots, was what we called a three bagger, and would cus and fight better than most of the men around here Padgett.
    3 points
  23. I think '65 Pontiac Bonneville wagons look real good with skirts. Craig
    3 points
  24. Took the '91 Reatta out of storage for the Spring/Summer/Fall seasons. Ran it on the highway for 25 miles...didn't want to stop driving because it ran so well. Next week its in for its annual MA state safety inspection with oil change/lube and biennial radiator flush:
    3 points
  25. I've made a few friends this week and Aaron just sent me this clipping of Petty using a Ford wedge back hauler... just when everyone said it never happened here's proof. I'm stirring up a lot of memories on the Petty pages and the Bobby Allison pages on social media. Here's to hoping someone out there will remember this truck and who was using it. There was a truck fabrication company in Charlotte called Baker Truck Body and I'm chasing after some info from one of the fabricators. My vin decode says my truck was from the Charlotte dealer region.
    3 points
  26. Wow, a beautiful UNTOUCHED Henney Jr.! Henney attempted to produce a low priced professional car by using a short wheelbase. In classic fashion their historical build standards were so high that the small car ended up costing as much as a full size professional car to produce. They had to sell them for less to be competitive and despite losing money on each one they built, they just could not make up the difference in volume. Henney won the government contract and a large part of the Jr. production went to the military. Professional car collectors like them because they fit into a regular garage.
    3 points
  27. David better hope none of the chapel benches need to be reupholstered...
    3 points
  28. True, but the REAL question is why would you ruin the look of a car with fender skirts? Only 2 things worse: big ugly visor & hydraulics.
    3 points
  29. I got motivated Saturday and put the body back on the rolling chassis. all new body mounts and hardware. I put a bolted body mount in place of the rubber puck puck to give the car a little stiffer chassis. Still a lot more work to be done but every step is progress.
    3 points
  30. I am always looking for 1957 license plates with my county code on them, because you can register your car to them in Indiana and use them. I decided to check Ebay for a 1958 one and wouldn't you know what I found? A sample plate, brand new in original envelope, with my county code on it. Perfect!
    3 points
  31. Jay Leno just released a new video on his: It is interesting that this car apparently doesn't have its original valve (?) cover. The Leno car has one with "Owen Magnetic" cast in the side. Jay said the original was so porous that it leaked oil out of every pore, so he couldn't really drive the car. He scanned it and used a 3D printer to mock up a replacement. Once satisfied with it, he had a shop make a new one out of aluminum.
    3 points
  32. I think his 1% figure is way low.
    3 points
  33. I used to have to go to swap meets within driving distance, slog through rain and mud, dig through boxes of rusty junk that may or may not fit my car, all just to find spare parts. Now I sit in my favorite chair and browse, and then it gets delivered to my front door a few days later.
    3 points
  34. Apologies if this site has been posted before - I just ran across it: Anthony's Model Cars Some pretty awesome models and dioramas, e.g.,
    2 points
  35. I was surprised today was sunny and 60 degrees. It's been a warmer than usual spring and people start getting the bug. It's hit or miss this time of the year and we could still get a snow storm. This week's forecast is wet and cold so I thought maybe I could wax up the car inside the garage. Trouble is it's covered in 6 months of dust and could use a wash. After much paused cranking it fired up. Ran it for a bit, put it in reverse and blah quit. Wouldn't start again. Pulled the plugs and ya they were pretty black. Sandblasted them and threw them back in then fired right up. Think I'll order a another set for this summer. Washed the dust and debris off it then took it for a spin to the local grocery store, you know, to dry it off. Passed the usual thumbs up and rubber neckers along the way. I love the way these cars pop out from today's models. It ran like it did when I parked it last fall. It's back in the garage again for probably another month or two. The only reason I took it out is we had a heavy rainstorm last night and it washed most of the road salt off the roads from winter. I...hate.....road salt!
    2 points
  36. M-mman, Gorgeous car! Thanks for posting the pics. I love the Mercurys - you don’t see many of them. I agree with you on the 289. Plenty of power for cruising yet better fuel consumption. That’s why I swapped my Galaxie to a 281 (4.6 DOHC). Well, part of the reason - maybe. 😁 JamesR, my Galaxie is not worthy of being in the same post as m-mman’s Merc, but here it is: (the poor lighting hides a lot!) The interior is the best part - I redid it last year: - John
    2 points
  37. I have been concerned with membership of our local region AACA for some time. We have been around for a while but were never a large club. When I got in about 12 years ago we had 25-35 people at out monthly membership meetings and always tried to have a program. Now we would be lucky to have 10 out and it is always the same die hards. I am 63 and the youngest or second youngest in the group. I have started a cars and coffee on Sunday mornings which Covid has made rather successful due to cancellation of other events which are sponsored. We are totally un-sponsored and it is totally casual or unorganized. I and other members of the club have not been able to recruit one member for the Harford Region AACA. Out of normally say 75-100 cars that show up randomly I would say 80% are hot rods and modifieds. We have a great time and have no trouble with burnouts and such but no one is interested in the club. I think there are lot of reasons for the declining club membership all of which are legitimate reasons though sad. The aging population has slowed everyone down and we simply don't have the energy we once did. Everything organized is more difficult today, worrying about liability and all the rules to be broken and no one including me wants the risk. It used to be if there was a car show the local clubs put it on for the public to enjoy once or twice a year. Now (pre COVID) you can go to 5 cruise nights a week and it is no big deal. Most young people don't have the connection to the cars our generation had and don't have the excess cash to participate in a hobby which is expensive. Lastly the interest in the type cars has changed and the modified and hot rod builders are driving the hobby today more than ever. I continue to support the all original portion but am in the minority. In spite of the AACA putting a lot of effort into the younger generation I'm not sure there will be enough people to support the Marque clubs or the AACA.
    2 points
  38. My previous comment was to the effect that could get alerts for going 36 MPH in a 35 MPH zone in an older car by using your phone. There are a number of "off line" navigation apps I know of that provide this feature. But as long as you bring it up. . . Yes, smartphones are basically tracking devices reporting back to the manufacturers and many/most of the app developers. I am amused by the fear that some have that a vaccine could have micro chips for tracking in it. First that would add to the cost (and there is a shortage of chip manufacturing at the moment). Second, the microscopic size of such a device would severely limit its power and RF capabilities, so they'd have to be tracking you from inches to maybe a few feet away which seems pointless. Third, why would "they" bother with the effort and expense when nearly every one is spending their own money to buy and carry around a tracking device (cellphone) anyway. GPS is a receive only technology. Having GPS in a phone doesn't directly make the phone a good tracker. What makes GPS a good tracker is that the location data it provides can be sent back to the app developers (or more likely the developers of the libraries the app developers use) via the data or WiFi connection. Even without a GPS, a phone is a pretty good tracker: If a phone is powered up and not in "airplane mode" then it is either connected to a cell site or trying to connect to a cell site. Your mobile phone carrier can see that at their end and they know a number of things: Which antennas of which cell sites can see your phone and a pretty good distance measure (based on timing) from the tower(s) to your phone. With that they can trilaterate (like triangulation but with distances rather than angles) your location. In a suburban/urban environment with lots of cell towers that can be very accurate. In fact, it is supposed to be accurate so if you dial 911 they can give a good location to the police/fire/ambulance people. In rural areas, especially mountainous areas, the position can be way off which is a problem search and rescue people run into a lot. On a smaller geographical scale, it you have Bluetooth turned on then there are trackers that retailers are putting into stores that can detect that and track you around the store (sharing the data with data brokers of course). So they know you slow down and spend more time in the tool section of the store and even stop by the air compressors but walk right past the children's clothing area. And if you have WiFi enabled, your phone may be broadcasting information about networks it knows about. So a piece of sniffing software on an appropriate device can know that you have connected to the WiFi at MacDonalds or StarBucks and what your home WiFi network name is (tying your phone back to a small set of real people to correlate with). On the other end, apps on your phone can learn about the WiFi networks your phone sees and from that determine where your are located even without GPS. Newer phones have some protections against some of this but I wouldn't bet that all phones are secure from these attacks yet. Wrapping the phone in tinfoil could help to the extent that it interferes with your phone connecting to cell towers and/or other RF devices. But it would be easier to simply turn the phone off. And if you are really paranoid and the phone design supports it, remove the battery. Or better yet, simply don't own a cellphone. Re-reading the above, I guess I am sounding a bit like a tin foil hat person. I do have a smart phone. I do leave it on with WiFi and Bluetooth enabled. But I also have it set so that all data to and from it goes through a VPN I control that does ad and tracker blocking so any information gathered about me can't be easily monetized. And monetization is what it is all about.
    2 points
  39. This was the subject of an episode of Myth Busters. They concluded that it is BS, Sugar will not dissolve in gasoline nor will it do any damage other than, maybe, clogging a fuel filter Popular Mechanics also debunked the legend also.
    2 points
  40. I believe that the answer to the REAL question is because Mr. Headgasket owns this car and in his opinion skirts will make this car look better, or more unique. I have stopped explaining why I do what I do to MY car to anyone who has a different opinion. Just my opinion.
    2 points
  41. Just to add to the wording that Locomobile extracted from the rant: " ...they don't have the intelligence to understand the unstated obvious." I offer for sale this 1944 Zoopermobile with full description of its condition except for "the unstated obvious". Buyer beware! Cheers, Grog
    2 points
  42. You need the skirts for a lowrider application. The goal is to make it look like it is riding on a cushion of air. https://www.bigiron.com/Lots/1962ChevroletImpalaSportHardtop
    2 points
  43. Amen times a lot.... I owned retail video stores in the 1980s. 80 percent of customers were fine, deal with them and move on. 10 percent were somewhat of a pain, but with money showing I’d get over it. 5 percent were a real pain, money barely overcame the effort. The last 5 percent, I’d offer to drive them to a competitors store and introduce them to the owner.
    2 points
  44. possible post in the stude forum will bring more responses.good luck
    2 points
  45. You forgot the most frustrating part of that rule - 20% of the people take up 80% of your time
    2 points
  46. Why don't you try shooting an email to Petty's Garage: https://pettys-garage.com/ Or maybe a phone call: 877.498.3745 Good luck. Cheers, Grog
    2 points
  47. Why the outrage? This isn't a surprise and is how it has always been. The problem is that most aftermarket companies building parts can self-certify, meaning that they're considered legal... until the EPA finds out they're not. Or they hide behind the "for off-highway use only" disclaimer, which is BS. So this happens. It also seems to be aimed primarily at the guys who build devices to allow diesel trucks to "roll coal." That isn't anything other than modifying your truck for the sole purpose of being an a$$hole. It doesn't make more power or increase fuel economy, it just makes a lot of soot by allowing it to run pig rich. Wheee! And removing catalytic converters is still frowned upon by the feds? Wow, what a shocker! The article also notes they're only targeting the manufacturers, not individuals. Nobody's coming after you and your toy car at the hobby level. This isn't a surprise, it isn't new, and it isn't an outrage. It's cracking down on people gaming the system for profit and hurting the industry and the hobby. We should all want that.
    2 points
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