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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/24/2021 in all areas

  1. I have a humorous anecdote regarding some (certainly not all) of the "experts" who own and those who judge. About fifteen years ago there was a a Corvette judging show at one of the top flight venues. A particularly nice, rotisserie restored, down to the last detail, early Sting Ray was being judged and the car was virtually flawless. There was some question about the placement of a factory-chalked check mark on the left front frame rail which turned into a bit of a heated debate. The dispute between participant and judge was whether the random check mark (which only appeared on some, not all Sting Rays) should have been exactly where it was or approximately 4 inches further back. This ridiculous argument had actually drawn a bit of a crowd when an elderly gentleman stepped out from the watchers and identified himself as having worked at the St. Louis Corvette plant during the time when this car was built. When he said he could easily clear this up, he had everyone's attention. He stated simply that the it was not a "check mark" at all. It was an "L" ........for "Leaker". It seems they were having an issue for a short period with the Saginaw steering boxes, some leaked and they would find this on the assembly line. It meant the car had to be pulled and sent back for a good, or non-leaking steering box. Nobody ever thought to go back and remove the chalked "L's" after the correction was made. After the ensuing guffaws, backslapping and a few red faces, all was back to normal.
    7 points
  2. Lots more photos in the AD. https://www.hemmings.com/classifieds/cars-for-sale/hudson/unspecified/2467061.html Saw this in Hemmings pretty cool for a Hudson guy. I think the price is pretty realistic. Seller’s Description: 1940 Hudson 40T • Coupe • Driven 81,000 miles Very rare. All original unrestored survivor. Was repainted sometime in the 70's. Everything works. Has the optional pull out truck bed. Original red leather interior. 3 on the tree manual transmission with the original overdrive. It has been in the Pacific Northwest it's entire life. A few small spots of rust behind the doors. I didn't want to fix them due to originality. This car is from the Pete Welzbacker Hudson collection in Seabeck Wa. This car was found on the Oregon coast in the Bob Harbaugh Hudson museum in the late 1970s. This is an unrestored all original car and a "good ten footer" Pete would say. It has one repaint MANY years ago. This is NOT a rusty car but has a little cancer showing in the normal places. It has the original $12 dollar option factory Ox Blood red leather upholstery. This is a Model 40T. The engine was rebuilt in 1994. It is a straight 6 175ci 92hp with a three speed transmission and working Overdrive. The car did not originally have the "truck box" but it was an option and was installed by Pete. All the memorabilia that Pete collected will be offered with the car. Feel free to call with any questions. Read Less Price: $14,995 OBO
    6 points
  3. Blechley's Blech White and a soft wire brush.
    6 points
  4. Me and my girl wet sanding my 54 Ford in 1960. Don't know where the Ford ended up but i still have the girl............Bob
    5 points
  5. 1930 Studebaker Light Six, purpose-built van for servicing Pennzoil signs (not for servicing vehicles).
    5 points
  6. I'm not sure we have answered the original poster's question on how to make the system better but he opened up not just a can of worms but a whole truckload of them in this conversation. I can tell you that AACA has a 20 plus member committee that oversees its judging program and it is constantly being looked at and revised to do the right thing for the majority of our membership. Not an easy task when 3 to 4,000 cars are shown a year. However, over the years with the institution of HPOF (original), DPC (drivers), certified race vehicles and the competition judging classes (over 100) I think we do a pretty good job of trying to satisfy our members. Always room for improvement though and suggestions should be sent to our VP of Judging, Chuck Crane. I have been at this game a long time and have shown several cars in AACA prior to getting this job. I have been fortunate to have won several national awards with AACA and awards at major concours. I now judge at a couple of concours and know enough to be very dangerous. Our editor, West Peterson, has a long history along with his family in the hobby and he has his views on certain aspects. He may be right but I always do not see it his way nor he my way. That being said, we both need to make it clear that we do not speak for the club when we offer opinions. Whitewalls, lights, mirrors, etc. are not universally despised by all judges, not, as far as I have seen and not automatic disqualification from awards. Simply the taste of the particular judging teams comes into play. In the end, as everyone have said, it is your car that is your true trophy along with the friendships you make along the way. They are priceless and hopefully do not tarnish! Those of us long in the tooth have seen almost every form of judging there is. Certainly the biased judging, car owner judging, club judging, concours judging which all at times can lead to results you may not be happy with! I recall my first full restoration was at a local show, I was in a class with some older cars and mine was fresh out of the shop. One of the cars was rough, very rough. He won first place in the class and being my first car I was a little steamed as i did not understand how that could happen. What happened next was even more unfathomable, I was second or third in my class but won best of show! I was not even up at the judging stand at the time and they had to call me up! I also went to a certain car club and was treated wonderfully, a judge came up later and told me I had tied for best of Show but they could not give me the top award as i was not a part of their club. I admired his honesty. At a major concours, I was showing a car for GM that my best friend restored and I supervised. I was told that day they could not give the car an award because of who owned it. I did not know that judging owners was a criteria! I bring these up as many of you have stories as well. Me, I appreciated the chance to have my cars evaluated. It validated the research and the effort to make the car as best as it can be. I still immensely admire the craftmanship, work and willingness to bring history alive by car enthusiasts. I personally have no desire for any trophies at this stage in my life except on the race track where I will most likely never, ever will win anything!
    5 points
  7. I believe if you're only showing a car to receive a trophy, perhaps you should find a different hobby. The car is the trophy, in my humble opinion, and that shouldn't be forgotten. On occasion, I bring my car to a local car show event. The very LAST thing I want from showing it there is a trophy. I'm there to share my car, and to see other people's cars on a local level. I DO show my cars in National events for judging, and in those events, the goal is not so much to garner a trophy (as I mentioned above, the CAR is the trophy), but to attain as high a score as possible from knowledgeable judges. All concours events are judged quite differently from each other. However, most of them go by "French rules", whereas presentation and taste count as much or more as condition or quality of restoration. In other words, if you paint your 1930s Classic bright red, or with high contrast multi-colors following every body line and contour, add on driving lights, spot lights, chrome wheels with white sidewall tires, a trunk on the luggage rack, etc., you will probably not impress the judges. While many of the accessory items are neat novelty items, and interesting by themselves, they really add NOTHING to the aesthetics of the clean lines the designer had in mind. Even if that car is completely authentic in its features, and has a perfect restoration, it more than likely will not win its class, and possibly will not even get an award at all. Speaking from the point of view of a concours judge who has judged for 35 years at high-level events, in concours judging, LESS is much, much more.
    5 points
  8. I only have my cars judged by myself and I am my worst critic.
    4 points
  9. I hope my opinion will help you answer your original post A Griffin... I started attending my first AACA show in 2016 with my 56 Chevy truck not knowing other than what the judging manual says about what I can expect the judges to look for, I thought I covered most of my restoration to as how the truck came from the factory, I went in with the hope of my truck being restored by me being able to what I call ( The AACA POINTS Ladder) to climb, the first step I was able to step on the (1st Junior), I had some issues to change but if I wanted to climb the next step to the (SENIOR AWARD), I had to change some issues that the judges found to be incorrect, so I changed them and got to the next step (Senior award), there was even a few more issues judges found I had to correct so I could get to the next step the (Grand National Award), there was no more changes that AACA Judging found but I still changed a few NOS items that made myself happier, the next step was the ( Senior Grand National) I made that step :), my next step this year is to get a ( Repeat Senior Grand National) Hopefully the Virus won't get in the way....I'm very grateful that our truck has climbed the AACA ladder so far, as West quoted ( The Vehicle is the trophy) I believe in that 100% The Awards that are given by AACA are there way I believe to show and document thru Judging to get you closer to that ORIGINAL FROM THE FACTORY RESTORATION, I didn't expect ANYTHING going into my first show with AACA but POINTS & AWARDS that I have been given by AACA & VCCA are proudly displayed in my ( Garage Museum) that shows the respect of the Judges for all my effort into our restoration.... To add to that RESPECT our 56 chevy truck was displayed in each clubs Magazine the past few years, another step on the Ladder.... From what I've seen at local shows, it wouldn't even come close to the caliber at an AACA or VCCA show event....plus I'm still trying to climb the AACA, VCCA clubs ladder that helps us PRESERVE our restoration for others to see at there future events, ( In my lifetime I will not do another restoration), It is a Great feeling when other members that are showing there Beautiful vehicles at the AACA or VCCA comment on our 56 Chevy truck, because they understand what it takes to do a restoration on there own, (I do the same same with other members vehicles), plus we have met some very Nice people in the years we've shown with AACA & VCCA, Some day down the road I will drive our truck, I will take my truck to our local event just to show (NO TROHPY) No Regrets at ALL with AACA & VCCA even if we wouldn't of made it up the Points ladder.....Hope this help answer your question A Griffin STEVE MAVEAL
    4 points
  10. Very easy to build a fan shroud for the car. And a shield/deflector above the fuel/vac pump, to help block heat from the exhaust manifold. I had some issues with vapor locking when it got hot outside and sitting in traffic. You can also move the fuel line over a little bit. Hudson's are also a babe magnet. So get ready for that. Nothing screams you have made it, or you have arrived. Like a Hudson step down. Ask me how I know.
    4 points
  11. Just for clarity, for those who are learning: The name is "Westley's Bleche-Wite," spelled oddly, but a very useful product. The company may have changed hands and may not be using the "Westley's" name as prominently.
    4 points
  12. That Weeks bloke isn't bad is he?... Done more in a day than I've done on my Dodge in the last 10 years!
    4 points
  13. This looks like a really nice solid car. I would expect it to generate some interest, but I think the 35k ask is high. There is something about the 34 that I really like, not the 33 and not the 35, the 34.
    4 points
  14. Thanks for chiming in. My intention isn't to kick a hornet's nest, but just gather information. While I'm rather new to AACA, about 5 years or so, I've built a fair share of cars that have been shown and judged, I've been a judge a time or two. I do what I can to promote the hobby. Heck, I'm an officer of the local chapter. I'm truthfully past the part of my life where I felt a trophy was the only way to prove a car was built to someones liking. Cars are a reflection of the person and shouldn't be built for acceptance. If we think about it, some people invest tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars into a cars to win a 7 dollar trophy. I am interested in others thoughts and have enjoyed the information gathered here so far.
    4 points
  15. For sale on Craigslist: 1956 Chrysler New Yorker Saint Regis 2-Door Hardtop in El Paso, TX - $18,500 - Call: nine one five eight five six thirty twenty seven Link: https://spokane.craigslist.org/cto/d/el-paso-1956-chrysler/7280400920.html Seller's Description: 1956 Chrysler New Yorker Saint Regis 2-Door Hardtop condition: good cylinders: 8 cylinders transmission: automatic odometer: 72,000 paint color: custom title status: clean 1956 Chrysler Saint Regis——tri tone 354 cid hemi 4bbl no rust always garaged. do not text me please call me can not respond to texts nine one five eight five six thirty twenty seven
    3 points
  16. For Sale: 1939 Plymouth Roadking P7 Sedan - $10,000 - New Hartford, CT 1939 Plymouth Roadking - cars & trucks - by owner - vehicle... (craigslist.org) 1939 Plymouth Road King. 95,000 miles, original, runs and drives beautifully. Has new brakes, water pump and head gasket. Very clean inside and out., however, there is a broken window on passenger side front (you can see in the pic if you magnify), it needs replacing due to a rock shattering the glass, it still rolls up and down though. Make a serious offer, No low-ballers please. Contact: no phone listed. Copy and paste in your email: 89a402b2439f311cbd27ac8319ba8683@sale.craigslist.org I have no personal interest or stake in the eventual sale of this 1939 Plymouth Roadking P7 Sedan.
    3 points
  17. Hi, my name is David Scranton. Just turned 21 in January and have been getting into cars alot more the past year, but I've only ever helped my dad in the garage and the oldest car I've helped him with was my 1999 jeep. So I have hardly any experience doing things on my own which brought me to this forum because of a car I've taken great interest in that I've known about my whole life, but have never even seen it be moved. My grandmother has had what I believe is a 1920 4 door buick model K sitting in her barn for what I'm guessing has been the past 80 years, and I would like to work on it just for fun and see if I can get it running. I dont have any pictures at this time as I have not been down to her house since covid began, but I know the windows are broken and the interior is ripped up. But the frame and body are in good shape if I remember correctly. Planning to get down there soon and would like to know what potential problems I should look for and where, and if it's possible how the problem could be fixed or if it will need replaced. I apologize in advance if this post doesnt give alot of detail on the car's current state, as I said I dont really have much experience doing this sort of thing so not entirely sure what to look out for other than frame damage amd if the engine block is cracked, and I havent actually seen the vehicle in about 2 years. Thank you for taking the time to read this post and I greatly appreciate any and all information that anyone can give
    3 points
  18. For sale on Craigslist: 1970 Cadillac Sedan deVille in Shelton, WA - $7,000 - No phone # provided. Reply to Seller through Craigslist email to: 221bcadeeac93e7fb116e0a035fc4de8@sale.craigslist.org Link: https://seattle.craigslist.org/see/cto/d/shelton-immaculate-1970-classic/7281484266.html Seller's Description: 1970 Cadillac Sedan deVille condition: excellent VIN: B0148269 odometer: 80,400 paint color: custom delivery available title status: clean Great deal, it's a survival sale. I am continuously amazed at how clean the door jams are, how the headliner is so clean and not drooping, The foot and brake pedals look almost new. No stains in the carpet, the seats look and feel like no one has ever sat in them, clean title. No rust, the top has no cracks in it. Paint might be the original, Adriatic Turquoise Metallic. Faded a little, thin in some spots. You could jump in this caddy and drive it across the country with no issues. It had to have been garaged it's whole life. I have showed it to a few people and almost every one of them is baffled by the fantastic condition this 50 year old car is. If you enjoy a big Cadillac, with a big engine that you can actually see and understand. This might be the deal for you. Lots of room and a joy to drive. Remember, this is a 51 year old automobile. Times are tough so I am letting her go, make an offer. Serious inquiries only please. Thank you, Dave
    3 points
  19. Not sure if I have posted this one before. Yours truly in 1953 -
    3 points
  20. A couple of photos posted on a local facebook page by the then owner of the 1930 Talbot 90. He sold it 36 years ago so the photos probably date from the early 1980s. They are not 'period' but do show some local scenery, and 'camaraderie' amongst old car owners. The other car is a 1924 Vauxhall 30-98 Wensum tourer. The owner passed away a few years ago but his wife is now in her 90s and the little guy in the back seat has the car now - currently awaiting a rebuild. The third photo I added to show how the Vauxhall owner drove his car hard. It was taken at a hillclimb in Dunedin in January 1984 - taken by my then girlfriend - later wife - as I was competing in the event myself. The primary reason for the loss of traction was the 'bovine guano' on the road -
    3 points
  21. And now for something completely different - mountain climbing in the Pyrenees during the 1927 Tour de France - chase car looks to be a Voisin -
    3 points
  22. I agree, very nice condition at a seemingly fair price. While I can appreciate the ease of the upgraded sealed beams, I would absolutely have to convert it back the very distinctive '39 style headlamps.
    3 points
  23. 3 points
  24. Not just the chassis - the body is done too... After stripping After a coat of primer - it's looking pretty awesome. A few repairs to make but in great shape overall and huge thanks to Matt! Time for some other VDC members to roll up sleeves and get involved - there's going to be plenty of rubbing down to do;)
    3 points
  25. I can't take credit for these - just passing them on. It is a sobering thought all of these photos are over 60 years old....
    3 points
  26. I'm enjoying this Topic. I'll add a few from my archives, particularly some rear views since those are seldom shown. 1940 Buick Station Wagon 1940 Cadillac 75 Custom Town Car 1940 Chevrolet 1940 Ford DeLuxe 1940 Graham Sharknose 1940 Nash Ambassador 1940 Packard Darrin Convertible 1940 Packard Darrin 4-door Sedan (Sorry about the reflection) Not a rear view, but seldom seen 940 Plymouth Pickup Not sure if this Packard is a 1939 or 1940 but I can't figure out how to delete it! It's pretty, though.
    3 points
  27. No title. Says so in the ad. Neat car but no way. 4 door post for asking $21,500? No way.
    3 points
  28. I've thought of that but I have just about zero welding skills nor do I have a TIG machine. I did visit the local welder I've used on other things but they thought the crack was too long and would just crack again. I've no idea if they have they have a TIG welder. It looks to me as if most of their work is architectural so maybe not. I also tried another local welder some time ago - they were ok but in the end I made the part over from scratch to avoid welding altogether. The heat treating guy said it should be welded...the welder said it should be brazed. In all, I haven't had much luck consulting "professionals". It may be that this sort of stuff is too fussy for any of them to be bothered with. I can understand that but it gives me a real appreciation of how difficult it must be to work on a project car if you are at the mercy of outside suppliers.
    3 points
  29. Old so may have been seen by some of you but new to me (3 minutes ago) -
    3 points
  30. I'd rather have one of these.
    3 points
  31. 34 Pontiac 3 window is on my bucket list. This is a 15-20k car.
    3 points
  32. I'm actually buying the car in this posting. I've spoken with the owner for several hours, gone over the 3 ring binder full of build photos and work orders. I've also spoken with the mechanic that did the majority of the recent work at length. I feel about as confident as I can with it until I start putting miles on it and finding the gremlins.
    3 points
  33. Since I do my restorations with my hands rather than my check book I consider the judging a validation of those efforts. I pretty much know what is correct both mechanically and cosmetic. Usually if I deserved an award I got one. If not I didn't. No hard feelings one way or another. As for the hardware (trophies) I either decline them or use them for target practice. As Mr. Peterson said. the car is the trophy...........Bob
    3 points
  34. I've been a judge and had cars judged a few times and appreciate the efforts of everyone. Sometimes I am surprised my cars scored so well and when it didn't I knew why and understood. Funny story, we were on weekend driving tour which took us to a small town's parade. A fellow on the tour drove a beautiful 1932 Auburn and he lost to a scruffy Model A and he was angry. A friend reminded him the winner lived in the town and the trophy had nothing to do with the cars. When Covid-19 conditions allow I plan to show a car I restored from an older restoration. I hope to receive my First Junior, the car will never look as well again, and then it will resort to a touring machine. Cars should be shown for awards, it is an important function of collecting. Stay well, Gary
    3 points
  35. Worked on more of the interior items. I installed firewall grommets and ran the lines or wires that go through them. I made up a brown Kraft paper template of the floor so I could cut out the generic floor mat material I got From Carter Truck parts. I’m pleased with the end result and tomorrow I’ll add the padding to the mat with adhesive. I also pulled the new rear window gasket around the glass, cut it to length and super glued the ends together. Tomorrow I will urethane the rear window in.
    3 points
  36. 2 points
  37. Must be a powerful engine to pull all that through the mud.
    2 points
  38. Why on earth would anyone see a factory defective part or any defective part (other then a cosmetic defect) on any car? IF IT IS DEFECTIVE IT MEANS IT DOES NOT WORK!!!! Mr P does open the door to another side of judging. Some vehicles are text book vehicles to restore, Corvettes come to mind, as well as Model A's, Camaros, Mustangs, Small T-Birds, and 5-7 Chevy's are just a few I can think of, where the restorer has all of the of the documented information they need to restore the car properly to be correct. Those classes are very competitive, and almost every car is done extremely well, and every year there is few "fresh out of the box" restorations done to the same caliber. From my observations some of the not so old cars from the 80's don't appear to be held to the same criteria. I agree with Steve's observations and sentiments 100% about the vehicles on the AACA Show Field. I had the pleasure of seeing Steve's truck in person at the Grand National at Auburn and at a VCCA Meet in Morgantown PA. it is a head turner.
    2 points
  39. Nice car. Like to see that the seller took the time to bring the car out into the daylight and provided several pictures of this car.
    2 points
  40. I agree, great design! A simple clean up with a few more pictures certainly would have helped.
    2 points
  41. Back in the days the price paid for the 1934 Pontiac 3-window coupe was a base price f.o.b at $745. Just $785 for the cabriolet. Let us all join together for the purchase of a "time machine" and purchase a couple of dozen and have some fun.
    2 points
  42. Well, so far it's doing duties as Car, going to work, going to the store. Needs a service coming up soon, grease and oil. Phil
    2 points
  43. Oil level can be checked by looking on the left side (sitting in car, facing forward) of the block towards the front. There is a float in the oil pan attached to an 1/8" diameter rod that comes up through a hole in the block. There are two markers cast into the block and the tip of the rod should be between those markers. 5 - 5.5 quarts does it for mine (a '25). These cars use a combined starter/generator (left side of block). There should be a fuse on the top front of it that is (if memory serves) 10 amp. It might be a good idea to check that the starter/gen chain isn't too loose before running it. There is a corner cap on the chain housing that is easily unbolted and allows inspection of the chain. If the chain comes off the gears or breaks while running, it can do some damage. The ignition system is good old breaker points and single coil. If for some reason the starter won't crank, it easy to just 'hot wire' a 12 V battery to the coil and run it off the battery and hand crank for testing purposes (but pull the S/G fuse if you do that). If the coil is bad you can use a 'modern' 12V coil (repro coils are available too). They also use a vacuum tank to suck fuel from the tank. Some people have retrofitted an electric fuel pump to fix a non-functional vacuum tank. If this is the case, you want to make sure it delivers low pressure (under 2 psi, iirc) or it will tend to push past the needle valve in the carb and flood things. Good luck and let us know how it goes.
    2 points
  44. ♪Boy! The way Glenn Miller played............♫ ♪ Gee! Our old LA SALLE ran great.....♫
    2 points
  45. 1940 VW beetle sunroof All wheel drive
    2 points
  46. I found this 1940 Hudson on another thread (currently advertised on Hemmings) and thought we should add it to this thread. Nice looking car!
    2 points
  47. The tubes are on back order again........won’t be available till June at the soonest. You need to look past size on the sidewall, and read actual inflated dimensions. Also, ask in the Stude club what others are running. Tires are not always available in all brands at all times. It’s getting so bad, I now keep extra tires in stock at home.
    2 points
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