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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/09/2020 in all areas

  1. This FORUM has been a great source for information, as well as a way to share our hobby. In noting my 6,000th post, I want to thank the many folks who have been thoughtful, considerate, sharing, and above all, provided continuum of our enjoyment of the antique vehicle way of life. Wishing all a safe and healthy holiday season, as well as a better year to come.
    15 points
  2. It looks as if the third time was, indeed, a charm. The first thing I did was put the intermediate gears back on the dividing head with the new attaching bolt. This worked perfectly and I had no problem with it all day. Then I started cutting teeth. Making gears one at the time time on a milling machine is tedious at best. By the beginning of the 20th century specialized gear making machines were in widespread use and the milling machine was relegated to making them only when it was a special "one off" item. Of course, that's exactly what we need for antique car work but the technique of doing it that way was probably never common and is nearly extinct today. I think I was about 4 to 5 hours on this - but keep in mind that I was not pushing and I've never done it before so I'm guessing that with practice I could get the time down to half that or less. This was the last cut... The gear itself looks very good... But I still have reservations about the measurements I took so I will make a "dummy" water pump shaft with this aluminum gear and send it to Ed to check in the White. I think there is a 99% chance it's right but if we check, we'll know. That, in itself, will relieve a lot of tension in cutting the finished gears.
    8 points
  3. What if it was the other way around? If you knew someone was selling a car for less than they had in it would you insist on paying more?
    6 points
  4. I guess they go hand in hand John, I like my cars factory correct and my day job is doing historic renovations!
    5 points
  5. I debated whether to list this 1969 Chevrolet Caprice Sport Coupe here, but it's another one of those cool unicorns that make me really excited. I like full-sized cars and I especially like those of the "iron fist in a silk glove" variety, something I call luxury muscle. I find it very appealing to see big horsepower masquerading as a grown-up's car. And I should tell you up front that this isn't a car for guys who shop by the price guides, because they'll tell you the price is out-of-whack. On the other hand, well, just LOOK at the thing, look at the options, and look at the paperwork. This big Chevy totally nails it. E.L. Mettler walked into Wagner Chevrolet in Baltimore on November 25, 1968 and bought a 1969 Caprice Sport Coupe loaded with more than $1600 worth of options--pretty much every single one and adding almost 50% to the price of the car. So many, in fact, that they almost ran out of room on the window sticker to list them all. Some of the more notable ones include A/C, power windows, power locks, disc brakes, cruise control, tilt column, hidden headlights (unique to the Caprice), fiber-optic headlight monitors, remote trunk release, and much more. He specified Glacier Blue paint with that awesome blue brocade interior and a blue vinyl top. It was restored about four years ago and the laser-straight bodywork probably looks better today than it did in 1969. Fit and finish are excellent and aside from a few small nicks on the lower rockers from being driven, it's in fantastic shape. All the chrome was restored (because there are no repro pieces for these cars) and the stainless trim was polished and straightened. The only real demerit is that the rear bumper is slightly off, which may be able to be tweaked back into position, and a small patch on the driver's A-pillar vinyl. Regardless, this big brute makes a statement. The blue brocade cloth interior is almost entirely original save for the carpets. The funky fabric is ideal for the period and while there are a few signs of age and use, it's pretty remarkably preserved. The comfort steering wheel was optional, too, and it's on a tilt column. Instrumentation is minimal (you'll note it has both cruise control and Speed Minder) so a pair of aftermarket oil pressure and temperature dials were added under the dash. The original AM radio is in the dash and powers an optional speaker on the rear deck and you'll note ultra-rare fiber-optic headlight monitors out on the front fenders and above the back seat. Woodgrained accents and some extra chrome dress up the top-of-the-line Caprice and the seat belts appear to be new, although the original buckles were retained. The trunk is finished with correct spatter paint and we have a reproduction mat on order that will be in the car next week. And I'm pretty sure that's the original spare tire that's never been used. Unique to 1969, the L66 396 cubic inch V8 was actually a 402, but who's counting? It makes a [grossly underrated] 265 horsepower and 400 pounds of torque, but that was with a 2-barrel carburetor and single exhaust. This car has been outfitted with a 4-barrel Holley, headers, and dual exhaust, so I'm guessing it's a bit stronger, but aside from the flashy headers, few people will notice. I believe this is the car's original, numbers-matching engine, although the stamping pad was wiped when the block was decked. It is date-code correct, it is a 3955272 casting, and it has proper Hi-Perf markings. The engine is detailed in Chevy Orange paint and wears a factory air cleaner with the right decal on the lid. You'll note the MSD ignition box on the inner fender, which rounds out the list of non-stock components and I think I'd probably ditch it if this were my car to keep--it's a little too conspicuous. The thing runs beautifully, starting easily and pulling all 4200 pounds of coupe around like it weighs 1000 pounds less than it does. The TH400 3-speed automatic was mandatory if you wanted an automatic with your 396, as was the 12-bolt rear end, which is full of 3.36 gears on a Posi limited slip, and both the transmission and rear end are original to the car. Power steering and power front disc brakes were--remarkably--both options in 1969, and this car has them so it's easy to drive and confident in traffic. The floors are spotless and appear to be original, the suspension rides and handles like a luxury car, and correct Rally wheels are fitted with brand new 15-inch redline radials, which are exactly the right choice. Documentation is EXTENSIVE. We have the original invoice and purchase agreement, original window sticker, Protect-O-Plate, shipping manifest, and other factory paperwork. We also have most of the build sheet, which is in pieces but portions are legible, including the VIN and the L66. I love cars like this--the quality is tangible, the pedigree is bulletproof, and there's just something special about a big car that smacks Camaros around on the playground. You couldn't come close to restoring this car for the $34,900 asking price, even if you got the car for free, making it a whole lot of car for the money. Thanks for looking!
    4 points
  6. Perhaps one of the most recognized of the Greatest Generation that fought and won WWII, General Chuck Yeager passed away yesterday at age 97 on December 7th - Pearl Harbor Day. 🇺🇸
    4 points
  7. Yes...it looks perfect but we don't know yet if it is perfect!
    4 points
  8. Today is Pearl Harbor Day. Remember what that means. Never Forget.
    3 points
  9. An earlier version of the Prestone that was reported to be made to place on the pump so that a customer would see it when they were getting gas.
    3 points
  10. Not too bad of a guess from a Pierce Arrow guy..........
    3 points
  11. I have friends who build their own cars. They build them from scratch, frames and bodies. Those are custom cars and I accept them. I know other people who customize existing production cars. Those cars are what we call bastard cars. You don't buy a canvas painting of Claude Monet and add your own touches to it, and you don't buy a 34 Ford or a 57 Coupe de Ville and customize over someone else's work. By customizing over someone else's work disrespects the original designers idea, education and their artistic creation. If you think you have a good idea for the design of a car then build one from scratch all by yourself.
    3 points
  12. 3 points
  13. Thanks Orin! This photo has never been published so I'm gonna launch it on to the Internet here. Taken at Bridgehampton in 1951.
    3 points
  14. Here's a better set of pictures of the metal plate on both side of the floor board. I also found the original boards and have included a picture of the driver's side board. I'd be happy to make some sketches for you or even ship the two original boards your way. Greg
    3 points
  15. These were the Americans who, rather than getting some bogus deferment, enlisted and served to vanquish murderous evil dictators, rather than "falling in love" with them.
    3 points
  16. This one used to hang in my old garage, it hasn’t made it to the wall at our new location. It’s porcelain and the temperature tube works. Was a birthday gift from my wife many years ago.
    3 points
  17. Congrats. The AACA should sell pins, like car clubs do for membership for 10 or 25 or 35 years, except it should be for the number of posts you wrote for the Forum.
    3 points
  18. Wow, stop and think a minute about that - how many keyboards have you gone through? How many late evenings have you spent wading through posts looking for something to add? It's been a big investment in time and effort and we're always glad to hear from you. You've added a lot to these forums and we thank you - so don't start slowing down! Terry
    3 points
  19. At least nobody made the mistake of calling in an "Antique Automobile Show." Terry
    3 points
  20. Long chassis, original head and standard differential, cruises nicely at 60 to 65 not labouring or over revving, goes like a bomb for such an old car, all systems original and working as expected, smooth and quiet, a good example of the 1930s driving experience. Frame replaced last year, bodywork being restored this and next year (slowly because of Covid difficulties) the car will be restored to good functional condition in preparations for an Alpenfahrt and then a trans America run (work permitting) The car will never be judged, I have no interest in rosettes, See you all when we come over for the trans America.
    3 points
  21. Gents, I studied and studied over the best selection of garage lifts. I did all I could to buy American. My wants and needs coupled with I wanted to spend could not balance out for an American product. The two post lift just did not resonate with me, so I bought a 7000 lb capacity four post Challenger from a dealer in DE. The dealer assured me for what I was going to use the lift it was plenty strong and safe. The dealer installed the lift and I bolted the uprights in my 5” concrete floor. As I’ve aged physical problems out of my control made it necessary I have a lift. With the repairs and restoration I’ve been able to do with my lift it has more than paid for itself. I have a 10 ft ceiling and enough space to raise the 63 Riv and stand under with ease. So, if budget allows you have the space and you are a marginally competent mechanic I’d recommend you have a lift. Maintaining the under carriage is a breeze with the lift.
    2 points
  22. On Facebook. (Not mine) https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/item/3587999334628675/?ref=category_feed&referral_code=undefined
    2 points
  23. This configuration was the designer's ideal: no side-mounts 'bullseye' to interrupt the flow as the eye traced the hood length and fender sweep to the windshield which then began defining the body mass. The rakishly-mounted rear spare parallel with the sweep of the deck completes this sublime profile.
    2 points
  24. Finally received my door jamb switches that Gordon rebuilt for me (took forever for the post office to deliver) and that was my problem. All lights now work as they are suppose to. He does an excellent job!
    2 points
  25. Nice looking car, would be even better without those fender mirrors!
    2 points
  26. Walt and Terry, These are very nice additions to the thread. They show two different eras, but also demonstrate how certain items continue to be relevant advertising over the span of decades. Walt, SERVICE is indeed a thing of the past in most instances where “service stations” are concerned. Far longer ago than I care to remember, I worked for a while at a Sunoco service station. Employees were issued company shirts to “look the part”, and when you worked at the pumps you were expected to wash the windshield and offer to check the oil as well as tire pressure. Since the most common fuel order at the time was “A dollars worth of Regular please. “ (four gallons at the time) the customer did get their money’s worth. Bob
    2 points
  27. This '61 Newport sedan is one of those anomalies one runs across from those years: the entry-level model loaded with options. The Newport sedan was fob $2,964, to that was ordered: TorqueFlite: $227; air conditioning $510; power steering $108; power brakes: $44; heater: $102; radio: $100; tinted glass: $43. This from what is visible in the photos, prices quoted from The Standard Catalog of American Cars 1946-1975, 3rd Edition, Edited by John Gunnell. Nearly $4.100 without whatever other options were specified, destination and taxes, etc. Hope the original purchaser enjoyed it.
    2 points
  28. I have found that the person one would call prudent is the person who should be watched, even avoided. They will travel for dealer to dealer trying to catch a salesman making a mistake then hold him to it. Also, if you check the prudent person's pockets you are likely to find an assortment of condiments from restaurants they have visited. Maybe even a number of ball point pens, more than you would expect. Beware of the prudent man.
    2 points
  29. Some threads jus need to be brought to the top again, and again.....
    2 points
  30. "Why it's better to keep original than modify," you ask in your heading. I'll say there are a very few customs that are attractive. They entirely resculpt the body and come up with beautiful lines that a true designer would be proud of. Those are not, however, the typical customs. But we're here to preserve automotive history. We want to see what the car companies produced-- actual mechanical features, styles, and interiors-- and save those for future generations. Those original engineers and designers were smart. The modifications that "Pete" welded in at Joe's Garage 40 years later aren't as historic. When we see a grand Victorian house, we want to see what someone designed in, say, the 1890's. Changing over to vinyl windows, hollow Masonite doors, and aluminum siding would detract from its history, its character, and its beauty. So it is with our antique cars.
    2 points
  31. and we have an answer to the clear lens question as well in that case. Thanks
    2 points
  32. Looks like intermediate gear setup for you dividing head is a good bit different than the L-W Diving head I have. I mine has the two gears in the same plane which is in the same plane as the gear that feed the head. The other end, of course, goes down to the table. Of course I haven't actually hooked mine up and cut gears with it so it might be setup wrong. I kinda hope I never have to find out.
    2 points
  33. A great car to use for movie shoots. Just a modest sedan could look good in a street scene! But you'd have to live in an area where movies are shot...
    2 points
  34. My great-grand father served after the civil war and saw some action in the Lava Bed Wars in northern California and southern Oregon. (He served but I'm not proud of the actions of the U.S. against the Native Americans.) My grandfather joined the Army at 16 and fought in the Spanish-American War. My dad went off to enlist on December the 8th but was rejected because of an ulcer. But he returned home and moved with his wife to Wichita and built B-29s at the Boeing plant in Wichita. After the war, they returned to their home. I think people from those generations gave to their country rather than taking from it. As JFK said in his inauguration speech in 1961. Ask not......
    2 points
  35. Lock your wife and your dog in the trunk of you car for an hour. When you open tne trunk, see which one is happy to see you.
    2 points
  36. Thanks Marty, 6000 is a bunch, but you have a long way to go to catch the leaders. keiser31 (34399), padgett (21671), RWBurgess (21111), RivNut (15362),mJohnD1956 (13699)
    2 points
  37. Walt, None of your comments are "useless" they help paint a picture of life in Manhattan, "Automobile Row" was something my Dad talked about. As the son of a chauffeur he may have had easier access to these dealerships and built quite a collection of sales brochures, sadly it was never saved, WWII got in the way. Bob
    2 points
  38. They were even taking Chargers, painting a flag on the roof and "01" on the doors back then. I'm glad that died out!
    2 points
  39. If you have NETFLIX I recommend watching the 12 part series World War II in color. It is a documentary using original film footage that has been colorized chronicling the whole conflict from all sides. This is not a "puff piece". Sitting through it would be a very valuable and sobering lesson to our younger generation on how the war started and how it played out from year to year. The numbers of casualties - in the hundreds of thousands - no, millions -and the raw horror and brutality should be mandatory watching in any history course. The footage has been collected and assembled from British, American, German, Japanese and Russian archives as well as others and there is very little glory to be had. These images show in graphic detail why few would talk about what they went through. The narration is well researched, balanced and thoughtful. Even at one hour a segment it still can only deal with the topic in fairly broad strokes. But this is the real deal, not Hollywood's version. After seeing what our parents and grandparents did to give us the comforts we take for granted, we should offer up a prayer of thanks every day.
    2 points
  40. A car that comes with both snow tires and a surfboard rack makes a statement, but I am not sure how to interpret it.
    2 points
  41. The company I worked for signed General Yeager as our spokes person before the book The Right Stuff came out. He was a great spokes person and when ever I saw him he was very gracious and engaging. He once told a story about getting his old Chevy truck going and he described the AC plugs as diamonds in a goats XXX. Needless to say he kept about a thousand sales people entertained for days. Dave
    2 points
  42. Monday started with a trip to Princess Auto Stores to get a new bolt for the trailer wheel/rim. Had to buy a 5 pack for 15 bucks but ... now there are spares (to be kept with the trailer...). Located my torque wrench, checked all bolts and tire pressures again (even on the truck) and headed out about 1 pm to ensure being in daylight hours should something occur. Being nervous, even more so now, I took back roads and stopped often to check tires and now wondered about wheel being condition. (great time to think about that right?!) Checking that consisted of holding my hand on the hubs to see if they were building any heat and watching for any new vibration of any kind. Fortunately, the trip was uneventful and even the constant stopping to check tires and such, driving no faster than 30 mph, time went quickly. Traffic out there was almost non existent which was also good. Once there I looked around for a place to drop the trailer as this is out in the country with not good drainage and didn't want to make a mess for my friend in the soft ground. The original plan was to do this on Saturday so he could show me and go for a ride in his 'new to him' Super Bee. Nice condition car if you like yellow but guess with it's hemi explains why it has factory race car type bucket seats. Should be a fun ride! As he was at work I had time to look around more. We have not actually seen each other or have been to his place since last January. I had to look over the Packard again that he agreed to store outside for another buddy. I've posted this before but it is getting worse for the wear now with paint fading off badly. The mice have increased their occupancy by the looks of it (and the smell). When the car 1st came out it was a very nice running / driving car and is a shame to see it left like that. Much like my Nash (only in a mechanical way) it won't be worth a fraction of what it was now. Sad.... Before I unhooked the trailer my phone rang and it was my buddy Rick. I asked him if his surveillance cameras had picked me up wandering around? He cautiously said, I don't have those why, are you there? Yup! Got things sorted out and decided to go for it. He then suggested where he'd like me to park the trailer, had a bit of conversation and said we would have to get together before Xmas and have a drink together to end this crazy year. With that I dropped the trailer and before heading home, had to check out his chickens. Not having been raised on a farm but did go out with grandma as a kid to farmers she knew and bought eggs from, I was surprised to see just how protective that Rooster was of his harem. While another long afternoon is gone it was at least for the most part uneventful. Now for another trailer full of stuff to be moved.
    2 points
  43. More progress. I measure progress in inches on this project. Every change seems to bring another change and more hours making stuff fit. The original Buick frame was not symmetrical but the Art Morrison one is. The front of a '37 coupe narrows dramatically as you get up to the radiator. Also I am adding A/C and power steering and the nailhead is wider than a straight eight. I also wanted era (nailhead era) correct pulleys as I think a billet serpentine system would spoil the vibe. I want the fully "dressed" engine to stand out and the accessories to fade into the background so no chrome on the A/C pump or PS pump. When done it will have a fresh coat of Buick green on the engine before installation. I think it looks pretty good. Getting all that to fit in front of the radiator was a Tetris exercise.
    2 points
  44. My father was also part of the Pacific Fleet in WWII and served aboard both the USS Fanshaw Bay (CVE 70) This ship earned 5 Battle Stars and a Presidential Unit Citation. And also onboard the USS Rudyerd Bay (CVE 81) This ship also earned 5 Battle Stars. Both were Casablanca Class escort carriers and both survived the war.
    2 points
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