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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/19/2020 in all areas

  1. Took a few photos today of the 1956 Coupe deVille and two 1955 Coupe deVilles.
    11 points
  2. Thank goodness, at $850,000 it's out of the resto-mod guys hands!
    7 points
  3. Starting a printed magazine in 2020 is an act of financial bravery, like opening a restaurant in 2020.
    6 points
  4. Good evening, quick update on the brakes. Front wheel cylinders have been out and soaking for a few days but aren't budging. Can hammer them in a bit but can't move them out, even 100PSI from the air-compressor and they don't budge. Same when torquing it down pretty seriously with the vice and a socket for a ram. Looks like it's time for new ones, NAPA has them for $35, should be able to get 20% off unless someone has a better idea. At least that will be easy!
    5 points
  5. Firewall fabrication is done. Now to permanently mount the A/C unit in the passenger footwell. I am sure glad I bought a mock up unit for preliminary sizing and fitting. The first picture is inside the car looking at it from the passenger side. The glove box is removed along with the dash cover. The second is under the hood with covers fabricated covers off.
    4 points
  6. B-52 Jet intake cowl and fairing; 1959 Cadillac front turn signal and running lamp housing; and 1960 Buick headlamp housing
    4 points
  7. I have begun the removal process of the parts car. Eventually and soon, that engine and transmission will be removed. This means getting the main engine parts crated and moved out of the way. So, I built me some new crates.The crate for the block was made so 2 people could easily move it around.The crate for the crank was made so that I can smoothly turn the crank inside the crate.The crates for each head is nothing special. But, the crate allows me to carry and stack very easily.
    4 points
  8. I finally cut the slots in the end of the Cadillac pump shafts today which sets me up to cut gears next week. First they were faced off and trimmed to the finished length. I'm not keen on cutting a face with so much of the work piece sticking out of the collet but the length was critical and I had to use a stop in the collet to make sure they came out identical. I decided not to put in the flats for the set screws on the second shaft because until I take the other pump apart I don't know what I'll find...I may need to use different measurements.
    4 points
  9. They are propellers. These Cadillacs are fighter aircraft in theory. When Frank Hershey penned the 1948 design he was looking at a Lockheed P-38 Lighting. When you look at the plane you can see the bumpers, side scoops and tailfins.
    4 points
  10. Hey guys. I bought a vintage Klaxon horn to replace my boring "beep beep" horn in my 1929 Graham Paige model 612. The horn was super filthy and not working when I bought it but what do you want for $40? In this video I attempt to clean it up and get it working. It turned out great! Lemme know what you think. Is it ok to replace a standard horn just to get the Klaxon sound? And here's before and after pics of the horn...
    3 points
  11. You can never have too many horns! Don't replace add another.
    3 points
  12. The reason is actually very simple. Because I cannot draw and post such pictures very well, let us see if I can explain it. The weak area in the crescent type wrench is that area where the spiral thumb wheel is mounted inside the handle. The cut and machined area between the thumb wheel and the jaw is the absolute weakest link in the design. A little tough to visualize, however if the wrench is used the wrong direction? The jaw applies pressure to spread that machined and thin area. Spreading that area will much more easily cause it to break than compressing the area does. Using the wrenc
    3 points
  13. Definitely a Lozier! It is a Briarcliff model, 1910 to be exact. It appears the sidelamps have been painted black instead of being unpainted brass. I have been a fan of Lozier since I found a 1910 Briarcliff body here in Seattle WA. That was in 1968. I was a letter carrier and was delivering to a very old part of Seattle under the Spokane Street bridge. The man I bought it from had quit driving it in 1918 when the exhaust manifold broke and he didn't want to fix or replace it. He had sold the chassis and kept the body and many parts. He even gave me a copy of an ad from the Seattle
    3 points
  14. Isn't that handy. Kind of like the lettering on a screwdriver that tells you not to use it as a chisel or pry bar.
    3 points
  15. There were some of those miracle in a bottle spray and shine wax treatments going around to the cars on the field. I went over to them and said.......go to town boys! They passed.
    3 points
  16. Image from Vanity Fair magazine in 1928 but the illustrator didn't get the hood length in proportion.
    3 points
  17. Someone sent this to me......driving on the field at the Concours. Lots of fun. I had the oldest car......and the largest.
    3 points
  18. No Paul, want to get back in there to visit it. I do give W.P. Chrysler's town car that is owned by a friend and occasional pat on the fender when I am in his garage where he keeps the car.
    3 points
  19. Greg I can appreciate what you say. Back in the early 1980s buildings were being torn down or altered at random with no requirements and some pretty terrible looking alloy skinned glass infested modern replacements took place in great areas that could have recycled the existing structure or even the facade ( with a new structure behind it to accommodate the modern needs. ) I had looked at in person what was being done in London, England to make all compatible , reuse facades etc. and took that information to our Mayor and trustees of our village ( where our family has resided since 1
    3 points
  20. At first, I had not idea how to drill the numerous holes at the pan and into the crankcase. The easy method with a rule and tracing point is hardly applicable when so many holes must be drilled with a relative precision. For the oil pan, I put it on a wood block, attached it with 4 screws, inserted the whole into a jaw. After checking that the pan was parallel to the bank, I could move the carriage the desired distance and do the holes, this is the first picture. The oil pan was then used as a template to replicate the holes into the block. To avoid unwanted rotational movement, I had to a
    3 points
  21. Hi everyone, here's an update on the Moon restoration. Since springtime I have sandblasted, painted, and rebuilt the whole running gear minus the engine, transmission, driveshaft, and steering Box. I had issues with the primer and paint when doing the frame, so that needs redone in the spring. Since winter is here, I have the frame bolted to the springs just for mocking up the body. I hope to resume the woodworking in a couple weeks. The honeycomb radiator was also gone through, soldered and painted by Ellet Radiator in Akron Ohio. Various other small parts have been found or made by others al
    3 points
  22. The T&C was one of those "flavor of the month" cars when it first became a Full Classic. There was a real feeding frenzy for all the big collections to get one and that drove prices up for a while and all the scruffy ones got expensive restorations thinking there was a new normal. After all those guys had their cars, however, prices dropped pretty hard, particularly on the sedans which are still very heavy 6-cylinder cars. The convertibles have fared better, but you can get a pretty nice 46-48 Town & Country convertible in the $60s today, which is less than half of where they were duri
    2 points
  23. The big brute sure looks good with blackwalls, doesn't it? Not loving the living room coffee table in back, though. I think these are great cars (obviously) and that they should be worth more than they are, but the reality is that this one is pretty much pegged on the expensive end of the gauge.
    2 points
  24. Absolutely superb car and would be a treat in black. It is not that much more of challenge to paint it black (as Rolling Stones recommended, and as Bill Harrah had his CG done). Please also consider deleting the trunk, I believe a big trunk overhanging at the rear shift the car's overall balance and detracts to lines of the car. This is the Harrah car to my understanding, in a later edition with the Blackhawk Collection.
    2 points
  25. My 1930 Packard has a beep beep horn too, and there is a Klaxon sitting here waiting to go on the car.
    2 points
  26. Who likes Cadillacs with tailfins? Nobody I know. HA HA...just kidding!
    2 points
  27. Starter Motor and water pump is all painted and working really well. hopefully my 1922 pennies won’t let me down. See those screws Ron. Home made.
    2 points
  28. This 1923 Franklin with California top was another of Bert Beaton's cars. I don't know its early history, but it came from Chase, B.C. Bert and Irene drove it a lot in the 60s and 70s. In the 80s it ended up as part of the B.C. Transportation Museum collection. When that collection was dispersed, the car was returned to the town of Chase, B.C. where it is still on display i I don't know much more about the Franklin however here's a few more pictures. I did drive it on occasion. It was all original and a good runner. The picture taken in 1965 shows Dave P's. 15 Franklin out wi
    2 points
  29. Ben, Just came across this long story & read EVERY post. In a way I was glad I may have been some help along the way. Through ALL the trials & tibulations you endevored om to ccompletion. Not many would have been so tenasoius as you have been & given up a long time ago. How is that little 5 bolt top cover tranny holding up??? I had so much trouble with mine, even with the 264V-8 I changed it to the six bolt top cover. No more problems after that except when I installed a '59/401. Then trans. problems all over again. Didn't like fast shifts betw
    2 points
  30. My roommate and I went to the local salvage yard and they just got in a 55 special 2dr hardtop. It was maroon with a white roof. He said he would have it off for me the next day. When we stopped back to pick it up I was horrified! They cut the entire end section of the fender off! This car was rust free! I wanted to cry! It was getting close to Christmas break and we were going to head back to IL. The body shop had the paintwork done and said if you want to come over and install the taillight housing we could. We went over installed the housing made sure the lights worked. We paid him $150 for
    2 points
  31. The designers truly were embracing the 'jet age'.
    2 points
  32. The twin booms with rudders on the P-38 are the twin rear pontoon and taillight fins on the 48-49 Cadillac; The intakes for the engine oil coolers is beneath the prop, and can be seen in the 1949-50 Oldsmobile under the headlamps;
    2 points
  33. Are you saying size matters, even if you very old?
    2 points
  34. 2 points
  35. While I do love this model, I think the 59 was the most beautiful Cadillac ever made. I also love the 66 Coup de ville. Stude light, are you referring to the Dagmars?
    2 points
  36. You got out without the Bump. They couldn't add extra services to the original request. No incentive for the mechanic, no commission for the service manager. Big red check mark at the Monday morning service meeting. "Sir, we recommend deflating your tires and reinflating with Nitrogen. We can do that for an extra $90." "Sorry, my factory specs recommend only 78%. Doesn't yours exceed that?"
    2 points
  37. I found what I was really looking for. This is our family in the 1953 Oldsmobile 98 that we used to travel in back in the 1960s. I think it was my dad's favourite "modern" car. There were four kids in the family at that time (#5 arrived shortly after) so the car was full. When the Olds came to its final days dad pulled the Rocket V-8 engine and Hydramatic transmission and installed it in the family motorhome, affectionately known as "The Moose." It was actually the second Moose - the first was an old Chev milk truck that dad converted to sleep 6. The second was a small Mercury
    2 points
  38. I think most of you know the story on this one. What an awesome car. I believe it is off to a well known restorer who happens to love original cars.
    2 points
  39. Thanks to all for commenting and contributing. I see so many notices on the TV about what any particular "day" it may be : national kiss a toad day, national pet a rock day, national dandelion sniffing day, so everyone how about a "National Hug a Great old Building Day"? you get extra credit if it is a former car , truck, vehicle showroom, factory or parts store. AND are allowed an extra scoop of ice cream, snort of whiskey, or $50 to buy some old rusty piece of junk if that Building you hug used to be the home of a Custom Body Builder!!! ( lots of those left in N.Y. City) We have tree hugger
    2 points
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