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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/02/2020 in all areas

  1. I'm still in love with my 1932 Franklin.
    8 points
  2. I am having lots of fun making these videos. My hope is that the next generation grabs on to these old gems! They are unique in many ways. Not seen on the roads too often any more.
    7 points
  3. Just last week while I was at my local parts store to pick up a couple of brass fittings for the vacuum advance pipe on my '40 Lasalle there was another fellow in the store trying to find some parts for a 1954 Cadillac 331 engine. As usual, the guy behind the counter was asking him for the model of the car he was working on so he could go through the menu in his software. It turns out he was a bit surprised when he heard the answer. The man said the engine is in a 1940 Lincoln Continental. There was a bit of conversation from the counter man as he was trying to figure out how to look up what
    6 points
  4. Got the wagon out to pick up some lumber for some fence repairs. Was able to stretch its legs a bit on a 60 mile trip on the highway to blow some cobwebs out before winter. Was able to get a quick “fallish” pic.
    6 points
  5. Didn't get a change to get to work on the car since I had a pretty full weekend, but I have been messing around with a new sign for the shop in the evening hours. The original one is suppose to have neon tubes on it, but I'm going to do it like the other one. I'm hoping to have time this coming weekend to get things progressing again.
    6 points
  6. I’m just guessing. Hole for locater pin to preserve hub/wheel balance if wheel was removed? I know in the days when we balanced tires by slightly loosening wheel bearings, hand spinning and weighting out heavy spots, we always marked the hub to wheel and tire to valve stem /wheel before removing to preserve balance on installation.
    5 points
  7. Hi All, Cleaned up around the buildings, looks much better. Approaching from the driveway. View from the street. View from the house. As soon as the next day over 50 degrees hits and it is not raining I will seal the floor. Thanks for viewing. Jim
    4 points
  8. Not familiar with Reo, but some manufacturers had a pin or hole on the hub/brake drum to help align the wheel, when bolting it on.
    4 points
  9. The engine was rebuilt at school and the dynaflow went in our basement for rebuild. All I had was part time job $ so it was a very limited rebuild. New rings, one piston, timing chain and valve job. New gaskets, tune up and rebuilt carburetor. We drove to downtown Chicago to J.C. Whitney to get the parts. (About three years later the wind blew down that tree!)
    4 points
  10. I just brought this Wasp today. It was on Craigslist. Its solid and runs well. Needs some sorting but not bad. Funny how someone chose red with a blue interior. I'll try the McGuires on it. I'll start a thread on it soon.
    4 points
  11. 1930 Graham 834 seven passenger
    4 points
  12. Brought the 65 Riv home from the body shop on Saturday. It is now back to its original factory color...looking great!!
    3 points
  13. The last small details on the crankcase have been added: the ridge for the visual oil level; 6 inverted "T"s and 4 tiny ridges like an equal. What is the purpose of those small elements? Maybe needed at the foundry or during the machining of the crankcase. One inverted "T" is thicker than the others; it would be interesting to know the reason. On several pictures I have from a V-12 engine, those elements are also present. After a good cleaning of the crankcase, I applied a coat of primer. It will most probably be damaged during the drilling of all the needed holes but the difficult places
    3 points
  14. John.......a few thoughts.......lots of people end up with too many cars, not enough resources to keep them all in running condition, and many cars they have are similar........thus, I try and teach newcomers to the hobby to think about how they will use the car......where they will use the car, and how they will get it there. Example a 1932 Pierce can be used on the HCCA nickel tour, also a CCCA tour, and a bunch of other tours ......but if you buy a X brand 1938...you are out of luck for a bunch of stuff. So figuring out how you will use a car and if you are trailering all are important que
    3 points
  15. Here are the two 1906 Locomobile race cars pictured together at a race camp preparing for the American Elimination Trials. Both were numbered 12 at this time but in 1908, in the Vanderbilt Cup Race, one was numbered 16, with the other carrying the number 1. They were said to be identical cars but had slight cosmetic differences. Both cars remain today, the number 16 largely unrestored and displayed in a museum and the number 1 restored and in private hands. The history of both cars is well known. The number 16 of course, won the 08 Vanderbilt Cup Race with the number 1 car placing second. It
    3 points
  16. You blokes have no idea, the worst part about any restoration is working under the dash.
    3 points
  17. 1912 Garford, The only surviving Garford, The earlier ones are Studebaker-Garfords. Historically a few Garfords were produced 1907-08 but none survived to the best of my knowledge
    3 points
  18. Friday health improved, so I started repairing the lathe. Completed the repair at Saturday morning. I am happy with the result, less noisy gearbox. Saturday morning, after completing the lathe repair, I started with the Cleveland engine line boring setup. My idea is to use the mill for this purpose. The engine just fits at the table of the mill (length wise). As this mill (Elliott U0 with universal table) is heavy and sturdy, I guess, together with some heavy iron to fix the engine and boring bar outer bearing at the table, it will do the job (see picture). For the engine and bearing fix
    3 points
  19. Or if you are like me, you could care less about having one extra hour of 2020!
    2 points
  20. Exactly as I suggested earlier in this thread- Matt, please phone me
    2 points
  21. I paid $5900 for it. Someone had recently replaced the rear shocks, brake flex lines, exhaust, head gasket, plugs and wires, radiator probably recored, and the carb was rebuilt. It needs tires. The radio, clock, heater fan and temp gauge arent getting power or are disfunctional. All else works. The car ran for about 20 minutes, maybe not enough to register on the temp gauge. The wiring diagram I found online shows various fuses. Included in the trunkare the FSM, parts book, and another repair book, look to be dated about the same as the car. Havent got it delivered yet, cant wait to get into
    2 points
  22. I dunno, I get offers to buy my RHD Land Rover almost anytime I drive it. The RHD configuration seems to be a major attractant, but maybe theyre all just mail men.
    2 points
  23. Magnificent building as backgroudn to such a nice car. Agreed. The "driver" is very cute, too, but you have to look closely!
    2 points
  24. I have to take time based medication multiple times during the day due to my paralysis and every time change makes that a pain (literally) to deal with. I’d be happy to pass on that and work on cars with anyone here, I’d buy the beer, wine, or sparkling whatever to go along with the job. Hope you are all doing well and found the extra hour of rest helpful to your well being. I had an extra hour to be in the garage yesterday working on my literature collection resulting in two oddball ignition parts catalogs getting listed in the buy/sell section.
    2 points
  25. Good to see a post from you Steve, hope all is well. See you at Hershey 2021! Bob
    2 points
  26. Just today I had success in getting my 40 Olds hand brake cables freed up. I soaked them in a 50/50 mix of ATF and acetone for about a week, refreshing the acetone as needed because it evaporates. I had previously tried the vertical + penetrating oil treatment with no success. In the end, after the big soak, I held one end in my vice, braced my foot against the vice, and gave it a good hard pull. The first one came gradually and a few pulls later was free. The second one was more resistant and then suddenly let go - so plan your landing spot carefully. But it feels so good wh
    2 points
  27. Try DME in KY. Bet he has what you need. 606 237 6648 Ben
    2 points
  28. Two things I remember about driving a Tiger in stock form. It tended to understeer with all that weight up front and the transmission tunnel took up so much room that the pedals were very crowded. In a straight line they were fun to drive and you were an attention getter.
    2 points
  29. Our 1914 Chandler Model 15 Touring. The oldest running Chandler motor car in existence, last restored by the previous (3rd) owner in 1960. Our 1966 MGB restored by us about 15 years ago.
    2 points
  30. My I-80 car show today.. Trip was 160 miles.. You do not see many dragons...
    2 points
  31. Only thing I don't like is he spent money on modern tires and new radiator, whereas someone like myself would rather have gotten the car for less and spent that money on recoring original radiator and correct tires. With that engine in this little car, I bet it's a blast to drive!
    2 points
  32. Sticking with Oldsmobiles here, I found an article that my dad wrote about the John Hendry Olds which was in the 1949 PNE parade photo early in this thread. Dad was a wealth of information when it came to B.C. and transportation. In the 1980s he worked with the B.C. Museum of Transportation as they gathered together many significant B.C. vehicles, including this Olds. The article is a little long, but it tells the whole story very well. STORY OF AN AUTO -- 1905 OLDSMOBILE ... by Lorne Findlay The 1905 Oldsmobile was purchased
    2 points
  33. Ok guys, years from now, I will say "it is Wayne's fault".......but I'm feeling a date in the future where we do the AACA version of "survivior/reality tv". A firm calendar day is set in the future as the shotgun start date. leading up to that date, you find a prewar car to buy that is at least 1000 miles from your home. We get as many players as possible, and you get to have a partner/teammate for the trek. No one can fly out before 6am that day. But anything after 6am is Go time. The car must be 1000 miles from home. fly, get the car, and drive it home. Document/stream the adventure.
    2 points
  34. OK this thread says period Images, so I am including here two images out of the spiral bound, hard cover sales catalog issued, produced and printed in France for the 1932 Lincoln V8 and V12. this is just to make some of you aware that a fair number of American made cars paid to have sales catalogs, brochures, folders and magazines produced in Europe - Chrysler, Buick, Lincoln, Ford, Franklin, Hudson to name a few all pre WWII era. I have tried to add these when I can to my archives. I know and have the 1931 and 1932 Lincoln color spiral bound catalogs in my collection , I learned they exi
    2 points
  35. That reminded me of a tour a couple of years ago, a good friend was navigating for me in the front seat of my '31 Pierce. I met the car in 1966, bought it in 1984, so it and I are old friends. We pulled up to one of the stops, guy showed us where to back in the car, I went forward, very smoothly went into reverse, and immediately started backing up. My navigator was wide eyed, and said oh my gosh, you really know where your car is and where the back end will be, very impressive....most people are hesitant with their cars when backing up..I told him I knew the car pretty well by t
    2 points
  36. Please, just dont use a drywall screw!!!!
    2 points
  37. Finished up my lighted sign this morning. Came out sweet. Going to have to make some more for sure.
    2 points
  38. Speaking of attractive PIII Rolls sedans. I cannot fathom the restoration costs but what a super cool car. https://lbilimited.com/offerings/1937-rolls-royce-phantom-iii-by-franay/
    2 points
  39. People laugh but I use Mother's mag and Aluminum Polish. Here is a clear coated fender I wet sanded out with 2000 Grit first, then hand buffed with Mother's. Clear coat is much harder and takes more work than this would to get a shine. I finished up then on clear coat with Adam's Polish to get the very fine scratches/ scuffing out. This would probably be fine with just the Mother's like I did my Auburn as it's a single stage paint. The last photo is before the Adam's polish final buff.
    2 points
  40. The local American car day was held yesterday - Sunday 1 November. I didn't get there but luckily a local photographer posted a bunch of photos on facebook. Most cars there are the expected run-of-the-mill stuff - predominantly post war Big Three cars. This Packard is one I have not seen here before. 1933 I guess. The photo is not clear enough to read the registration sticker on the windshield.
    1 point
  41. AJ - It’s a time and money issue. We all seem to have much less time than we used to have, add in the increasingly expensive restoration and repair costs.........actually, once a car is fully sorted......the cheapest way to store it is drive it ten miles every month. Running cars need much less attention and money then trailer queens and garage rats.
    1 point
  42. I'm easy. 1937 & 38 Buicks do it for me. Prefer the Century but a Special is just fine.
    1 point
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