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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/12/2020 in all areas

  1. Last night the Spyder was loaded up for the trip home to Oregon. She has New Hampshire plates, registered last in the early 80’s and I know she was shipped down here a few years after that. It’s bittersweet to remove her from her long sleep, as she is the very last thing I am taking out of dad’s shop. It’s a relief to know that I somehow managed to get both shops and his home cleared out, but it’s an odd feeling to leave Harper and know that I never have to go back. The timing feels right, as a huge pipeline is going in just behind his properties. I know my dad would have not liked th
    15 points
  2. 2019-04-23_09-05-42 by Kerry Grubb, on Flickr 2019-04-23_09-06-08 by Kerry Grubb, on Flickr 2019-05-02_10-28-52 by Kerry Grubb, on Flickr 2019-05-06_06-56-15 by Kerry Grubb, on Flickr2019-05-06_06-56-47 by Kerry Grubb, on Flickr 2019-05-06_06-56-39 by Kerry Grubb, on Flickr
    5 points
  3. Here is a Reo Royale 18 inch wheel that is part of a set that Dayton just restored. They are going on the Dietrich bodied sedan.
    5 points
  4. I told a friend I was spending all my inheritance on my daddy’s cars. She said I need a bumper sticker that says that. 😂
    4 points
  5. Some progress but it least something overhauling the brakes Also..
    4 points
  6. Friday morning update.... have 6 1/2 sets complete, should be able to make another 3 1/2 sets to get me 10 total sets. I have randomly takes 1 seal here or there and torn them apart and validated cure at various stages, 6 hours, 12 hours, 24 hours, 48 hours look at how it is curing, adhering to the metal inset, etc... looking good so far. up until 48+ hours they are still gooey in the middle. and the longer it sits the stickier it gets. but after 48 hours they look good, solid. the metal inset provides a nice backbone to support and hold the shape. with no inset i can
    4 points
  7. So my wife and I were out in the car tonight. We picked up a tranny. She was on top. I was on the bottom. It was a bit of a struggle but we got it to settle in....Wait minute. I was out in the garage working on my ‘38. I asked for her to help me guide in the transmission. I was under the car. She was up above in the cab. Floor pans out. The tranny wouldn’t line up. No way no how. I had a spare pinion and it wouldn’t go through the clutch into the pilot bushing either. So out it all came. Tranny, clutch disc, throw out bearing and pressure plate. My wife dropped the throwout beari
    4 points
  8. My McLaughlin 25-45A started out from the factory as a 25-45A which apparently was an option for colder climates like we have up hear in Canada. The remnants of the fixed top were still with the car when I got it as well as the infloor exhaust heater was in the back seat floor area. I had no desire to try to restore the fixed top and as the top bow saddle mounting brackets were still on the car, they had been cut off flush with the body sheet metal I decided to restore the car to a folding top.
    4 points
  9. I bought a car from a broker house once. In the phone conversation I was told the car ran perfectly and had no issues. The broker told me the car did not have any major leaks,. When I arrived the radiator had a pretty good leak. The broker told me it was not a leak but rather a drip. I asked the difference. I was told a leak makes a big puddle on the floor a drip only makes a small puddle. I found the charging system not to be working and the broker asked why I cared, because nobody drives old cars that far. I have driven the car several thousand miles now that it is fixed. On the test drive t
    4 points
  10. Well two years ago while my grandfather was still alive he gave me the 33 Hupmobile. That is my next project after finishing my 70 Chevelle drag car. This is the car right after I brought it home.
    4 points
  11. I’m not disagreeing but you would reassemble for the fun of it. A true amateur restoration. Not about the money. Will be 100 years old soon
    3 points
  12. Similar, but the hill isn't steep enough, sidewalks are too narrow, the road is too wide, and there are no half naked hippies walking around.
    3 points
  13. A little more progress was made yesterday afternoon. The plug wiring tube is now in place. The NOS AC Titan Spark Plugs were gapped and installed. The water return pipe on top of the block was installed permanently. The Marvel Carburetor is just in place for the photo. I will take it off so that the steering column can be re-installed. Barbara helped me get the timing set. We gapped the points at .020". That was where the three hands really helped with the feeler gauge. It's getting there. Terry Wiegand South Hutchinson, Kansas
    3 points
  14. Instagram friend just bought this “for his wife” yea brother, uhh huh, right..... told him “good luck wit dat”
    3 points
  15. FYI, the National Meet Schedule is printed in each edition of the AACA Magazine. I use that information to update my electronic calendar. One thing to keep in mind is that Meet information printed in the magazine HAS CHANGED on occasion in the past so one really needs to read every magazine and keep your own calendar up-to-date. The chance that change happens tends to occur with Nationals that are further out in the future from then present time. BTW, IIRC the current AACA magazine lists some Nationals that will be held in 2022.
    3 points
  16. This company has been an excellent fuel pump supplier in the past, http://www.then-now-auto.com/ Dave
    3 points
  17. Your cycling that you noticed in the fuel system is normal. It is the vacuum tank switching between suck mode - which shuts off the vent, and opens the line to the tank, and drain mode, where it blocks the fuel line and opens the vent line, effectively creating a vacuum leak to the manifold, The only thing you can do is possibly adjust the carb so that it runs a little crappy in both situations. LOL. No really, this is the way those tanks work.
    3 points
  18. Soooo.....Rummaging around my bits and pieces I got when I original bought the car I came across two complete brake drum / backing plate setups. Couldn't see the Banjo Fitting for the year and years of muck built up around the. Finally got the socket over the bolt and removed them. Looks like they may had had a few fails and changed the design so the collar is incorporated in the complete fitting. They cleaned up pretty well. Also took a shot of the front of the car.....slightly different aspect of the car. Cheers Ian
    3 points
  19. " Gall Bladder green" ? WTH? #99
    3 points
  20. Gary and the boys at Dayton do great work. And in the last ten years, they are the only outside supplier I have ever worked with that always got things done on time, on budget, and made things easy.
    3 points
  21. The way the help desk knows a problem is resolved is the user quits calling.
    3 points
  22. Auto City Classics came through again today. New windshield ordered Monday and arrived 4 days later. Beats waiting 6 weeks for a broken one from Summit.
    3 points
  23. Well isn't that nice. No regard for those high risk who need to go out for supplies, just breathe all over them by not wearing a mask. Are you doing the shopping for those at risk? Or just being selfish?Wearing a mask is something nice to do for others, but people are too selfish to even do a little something.
    3 points
  24. Just got my original radiator back....re cored , media blasted, re soldered and pressure tested...turned out great ! Next up will be a carburetor rebuild and then I should be ready to start up the 427 Big Block. Steve
    3 points
  25. Just a short note.........most cars I have serviced that have been to pebble, and even class winners, usually need 80 hours or more of my time. Some need hundreds of hours............
    3 points
  26. Pay the shipping if it's a car you want, no questions asked. It's not expensive and you get a car you want without worrying about limiting yourself to your neighborhood.
    3 points
  27. Clark’s Corvair has what you need. They advertise in the Riview and are on the net.
    3 points
  28. For Sale on Ebay 1960 Buick LeSabre 2-Door Hardtop in North Chicago, IL - Classified Ad Price $36,400.00 or Make Offer - Call 847 960 3386 Link: https://www.ebay.com/itm/224040679131 Ebay Seller: thelastdetail Seller's Description: EXCEPTIONALLY WELL PRESERVED, HIGH-QUALITY SURVIVOR ONLY 55,000 ORIGINAL MILES AT TIME OF WRITING STRIKING PEARL FAWN/CORDOVAN FINISH OVER FAWN/BLACK INTERIOR 250 HP 364 CI V-8/TWIN-TURBINE DYNAFLOW AUTOMATIC INCLUDES PROTECT-O-PLATE AND OWNERS MANUALS STUNNING 1960S BUICK STYLING AND GLAMOROUS PRESENCE FEATURES
    2 points
  29. The Great Molasses Flood, also known as the Boston Molasses Disaster or the Great Boston Molasses Flood, and sometimes referred to locally as the Boston Molassacre,[1][2] occurred on January 15, 1919, in the North End neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts. A large storage tank filled with 2.3 million US gal (8,700 m3)[3] weighing approximately 13,000 short tons (12,000 t) of molasses burst, and the resultant wave of molasses rushed through the streets at an estimated 35 mph (56 km/h), killing 21 and injuring 150.[4] The event entered local folklore and residents claimed for decades afterwards
    2 points
  30. I have MUCH better photos, from the Classic Era.......but if I post them, Peter will complain to Steve M.........like he is going to do anyway with this one.........
    2 points
  31. Here's the latest update, current as of today (Fri, 12 June 2020), for the remaining AACA national activities in 2020. Sadly, the Eastern Divisional Tour has been cancelled, but has applied to reschedule the tour for next year on 2-5 June 2021 (pending AACA Board of Directors approval). All members registered for the tour have been e-mailed by the Tour Chairperson (Charles Emery) and given the option of carrying over their registration to next year or receiving a full refund. - Grand Nationals in Allentown, PA (21-22 August) - Updated 11 June 2020 - Glidden Tour (hos
    2 points
  32. These are highly prized by every segment of the hobby. They have been a favorite for both stock restorers and street rodders for more then two decades. Just about the time we think that they are all dried up one will pop up. IMO you cant's go wrong for the price. These are pretty straight forward, they used the standard 1937 Dictator coup body, chassis and running gear. They used the same basic 6 cyl. engine engine that was used in larger cars and trucks as late as 1950, in some cars, and some pickups into the 60's (not to be confused with the smaller 6cyl. Champion engine used fr
    2 points
  33. Tomorrow I will be making a short trip to check out a Studebaker Express that is for sale in my area. Just wondering what to pay special attention to
    2 points
  34. Philipson's ad for Cord on the back cover of Bonniers Månadsmagasin in 1930. Interesting as the front-wheel drive American is absent from the list of car models in the Royal Swedish Automobileclub's almanach/handbook for that year, eventhough Rolls-Royce and Isotta-Fraschini are listed
    2 points
  35. Hope he is not the one that has been throwing parts at it. Sometimes you really need a hobbiest who doesn't care about "billable hours" when dealing with a 40 year old car.
    2 points
  36. Thank you Terry. I often think about how my dad led me to all of you who have supported me so well during this stage of my life. So often in life, you find what you need, when you need it.
    2 points
  37. With some regret I have decided to find a new home for our 1935 Standard Coach. It has languished in our garage for almost 8 years now and I have only made time to drive it about 300 miles or less. Life keeps getting in the way. Car has the factory paint and upholstery in very good condition and the original fabric top that I have re-sealed and coated. Surface rust on frame and undercarriage but no real corrosion. Body wood is 100% solid. Black paint/black wire wheels. Original woodgraining in decent condition. Built at Baltimore assembly plant, July '35. the good: 55,000 mile survi
    2 points
  38. A wonderfully detailed and sharp photo of a 1934 Plymouth DeLuxe (engineering code PE) with a number of options (dual trumpet horns, bumper guards, passenger side wiper, etc.). License plate brackets front and rear but no license tags so I am assuming this is a brand new car at the time of the photo.
    2 points
  39. Tonight I started the old girl and without the filter she kept running until I shut it off after 40 minutes or so. While idling about 450 rpm according my dwell meter, the dwell was about 34. I did notice a bit of a change in performance over a regular period of time. While the engine was idling and the fuel filter bowl was full It ran very smoothly. All of a sudden when you could see bubbles in the fuel filter bowl there was a drop of 50 or so rpm and idle got a bit less smooth. As the bubbles stopped in the fuel filter bowl the rpm picked up 50 or so rpm and smoothed out. This cycle re
    2 points
  40. well I went up to check on the car no progress so I brought an air sensor and four screws and a plug later it was all fixed. I settled up for the tail pipe and the brake work they did and am just waiting for the tow truck. i thanked them for their work. But it was time to get it home. I still have to replace the egr valve and belts but that’s small stuff!
    2 points
  41. So far, everything had gone well with this job but just when you think it's easy, something goes wrong. Next I turned the piece around to make the counterbore on the other side uniform... it was wildly off. And went right through the casting at the bottom edge, something I hadn't anticipated but fortunately isn't really a big issue because the casting itself is so massive. I filed the slot to make it look as if it was supposed to be there. There is supposed to be a notch on this side for a corss pin in the shaft of the crank handle. You can
    2 points
  42. Final product, it is the same molding with the drilled holes, I took a picture of the reverse side to show the spot welds. The holes on the lip are the mounting holes.
    2 points
  43. Leave the clutch alone for now........... You can run the old style green coolant or run water with cutting oil or a water anti rust treatment. Cutting oil is cheap, and washes off with a hose.......no stains or mess....a big plus. Just don't let it freeze. Yes, prime all the cups. First, pull all the plugs, and crank it over with the starter for 30 seconds at a time waiting one minute in-between. Do it five or six times. Be sure the battery is fully charged. Check the oil.....the car can be tricky and it can be hard to figure out how much is in the case. Ch
    2 points
  44. Spare is mounted on the rear. Not interested in trading, I do not have time to enjoy this car properly right now. It is in unusually good condition, but there are at least two other unrestored 35 Standards in the Vintage Chevrolet Club.......
    2 points
  45. It's great fun when we can help people on line fix a running problem. Please pay the kindness forward is some way................take a young person with an interest for a ride or to a car show.
    2 points
  46. It comes down to engineering. When originally designed, the automaker wanted to sell options. Options are big profit makers for both the manufacture and the dealer. In the early 1960s power steering was not universally desired (so not 100% of the cars were built that way) but a customer might want it installed after the purchase. (Except for maybe a radio upgrade or wheels, I dont think there are many dealer options anymore) To make the installation quick and easy AND PROFITABLE the manufacture built all the frames with all the holes in all the right places to bolt the accessories into pl
    2 points
  47. Rear seat grab rope recovered. Door panels will be next.
    2 points
  48. The first generation Rivieras came with a type 27 battery. That battery, if installed per the factory, would have the positive post nearest the radiator BUT the post would have been at the front of the battery, in front of the filler caps. The 27F (for Ford), if installed per the folks in the ROA, puts the positive post nearest the radiator BUT it puts that post on the back side of the battery. It's much easier to run the battery cables that way. Keeping the positive post away from the hood and the inner fender is just plain good thinking. It will short against the hood and destroy a whol
    2 points
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