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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/27/2020 in all areas

  1. Hello all, A few days ago I introduced myself as a new be and was waiting for my 41 Sedanette to arrive. Well it came today and I'm like a 69 year old kid on Christmas morning.. I promised some pics, so if I get them into this topic ( first time posting pics) they should be below. Hope it woks. I'll post better ones when I have a better day outside for quality pics. Here goes!b
    8 points
  2. I went to pick up the car today. When I arrived, Levi was rinsing the car off with a water hose. It seems that a few minutes before I arrived, some landscapers had decided to operate some leaf blowers in the area and had stirred up a major dust storm on the car just after Levi had pushed it out of the shop awaiting my arrival. After writing him a check for my final payment, I hooked up the battery cables, hopped in, and started it up. I had a friend follow me since the car did not have any taillights on it. The approximately 8 mile drive home was uneventful, but I do have some good advice for
    7 points
  3. Lot of work done today. Blasted all parts of the distributor then primed and painted the body. Assembled the vacuum advance bracketry. Put the pinion assembly on the driveshaft and put it in the torque tube. Check out the weld on the driveshaft socket done by the driveshaft shop. They do great work! Made up the brake lines and connected the to the banjo fittings. Installed the emergency brake cables with the cable retainers and new felt pads. Using Prussian Blue, I set the lash on the ring gear. The depth of the pinion was perfect with.025worth of shim. With the marks showing in the correct ar
    7 points
  4. The color photo in the first post is NOT the original Golden Rocket. It is a photoshop version. Note the fins, the altered angle of the C-pillar, the chopped roof, the added Bertone emblem, the wheels and tires, and the fact that it is lowered. Also note the artist's watermark in the lower RH corner. There are a lot of these photoshopped what-if renderings on the web now. This is the original, GM version of that photo, without the photoshop embellishments.
    6 points
  5. Forgot to post this yesterday...my stash! Or at least, a portion of it. To give a better perspective of how many there are... here I am standing in front of them. I'm 5 foot 7. I stopped counting when I hit 1000 models, in 2007. And yes, I'm quite aware of the fact that with the money I've spent on models and die-cast (which I lost count of somewhere over 10,000 unique cars) and storage unit for same, I could have had a real car. But I can see these...
    6 points
  6. Not doing much work these days, trying get my cars out for weekly drives to keep them limbered up. I may start some work on my 34 Chev and will share on my thread. I was thinking about starting a thread here for my 66 Monaco wagon. I already shared my A/C conversion on the Technical forum. If I start a thread here it would be for preservation stuff rather than restoration, would there be any interest?
    5 points
  7. Thank you, Peter for the much needed simplification of on how to use the Forum with very simple explanation steps on answering various "how do I do this questions". This was needed for years...good job! Regards, Peter J.
    4 points
  8. John, The engine is built from wood , brass and plastic .Mostly laminated plastic Venician blind slats that are made from that soft foam material. Very easy to shape and glue. All the bolts and nuts are real fasteners. Took about 1 1/2 years. Still needs the wiring and spark plugs. Having trouble making the wire harness mount. Incidentally, if you look carefully at the photo of the air cleaner, you will notice that behind the screen is an actual copper filter. Wish I had Roger Zimmerman's talent! Here's some pics of my 1/16 scale 1931 Ford Model AA chassis. Sorry for the
    4 points
  9. While waiting out the weather so that I can unwrap the engine and get it out of my truck, I finished getting the rear seat footrest back in place. Gary Martin of Goldfield Trim did the edging work on the Coco mat for me. I can safely say that on the inside of the body from the back of the front seat on back things are in place and finished up. All we can say at this time is Come On Sunshine! Terry Wiegand South Hutchinson, Kansas
    4 points
  10. Matt... yes they're fabulous cars and great to drive. The Airflow Club has many knowledgable and helpful members and we have many of the small, but important, restoration items available in our Club Store. Sending along a few pics of my 36 Desoto coupe. P/S ...Your wagon looks great with those wire wheels! Glad they went to a good home.
    4 points
  11. AACA UPDATE: Event Cancellations & National Headquarters Shutdown AACA and its affiliates will continue to monitor issues related to the coronavirus, as well as abiding by CDC and other governmental agency recommendations. Our members are our utmost concern, and we will work diligently to keep you informed of changes to scheduled events as they arise. As such, we have two new developments that we would like to notify you of... The AACA Western Spring Nationals and Founders Tour in April have been canceled. The Phoenix Region will process refunds as soon as possible.
    3 points
  12. Built many models growing up which probably help get me into the old car hobby. Been decades since building a model however a few years back I was fortunate to find a few 55 Pontiac unassembled promo models still in the sealed box. I decided to put one together and try and make it look like my real 55. Even have a cover for it so when the real one is covered the model is also. When friends visit the shop they get a chuckle. My wife thinks I'm nuts. Maybe she is right
    3 points
  13. After seeing a 67 Riviera in Charcoal Grey I had to paint my 65 that color. It is a really handsome hue!
    3 points
  14. Thanks again everyone for your enthusiasm and support for this "period" thread. It has gone waaaaaay beyond my expectations as to how everyone would react. Makes me feel good that after 55 years of membership in AACA I can finally give back a little and get others to take the time to contribute as well. Keep it up everyone! Walt
    3 points
  15. For many years we had a great shop up north, that were the go to guys to align anything, and they could handle a ten ton truck, or a Fiat Jolly. We could work with them also, which was a great benefit. They closed two years ago. Now down south, I have assembled all my own tools to do alignments in the shop myself............by careful searching of a combination of old and new modern tools, we can easily align all our cars. Our Model J- 357 has a steering damper on it for almost fifty years, and I spoke to all the guys who had serviced the car. They couldn't get it to stop the death wobble, so
    3 points
  16. I know very little about Studebaker's other than owning probably the last surviving 12 Garford. This is one of the best threads in the past several years in my opinion. The knowledge and expertise of forum members is remarkable. I check several times a day for new postings. I hope Touts will continue this thread throughout the restoration . It reminds me of when I found my 38 V-16 Cadillac Convertible with automatic transmission which had been sitting outside in Maine for 8 years with the top down, no hood and the heads laying on the ground. It is nice to see that people in the hobby are
    3 points
  17. For rare kits, I've built this one... For rare subject matter...how about this one? It ran two Cup races in 2002, and I believe I have the only set of 1/24 scale decals ever sold. I had the entire body chrome plated, the real car was wrapped in chrome- the second full body wrap in NASCAR history.
    3 points
  18. A beautiful shot of Tioga Pass, California in July 1950. An attractive lady is standing next to a 1947 or 1948 Buick Super 4 door sedan. I wish I could identify the car in the lower left part of the pasture. It look pretty cool!
    3 points
  19. 1952 Buick Super Riviera from an undated 1950's Kodachrome slide in my personal archive.
    3 points
  20. Interestingly I have just finished painting my ' 66 GS back to its original B code gun metal gray in a frame on restoration I am hopefully getting the car in the next couple of days from the paint shop and I will be glad to send you some pictures. My car was at some point painted black laquer in a Texas dust storm! I had it taken back to bare metal during this repaint . I can tell you that when I had the paint shop spray out a card for me , it was absolutely a surprise . I loved it! As mentioned above , it's a very subtle blue hue that pops in the sunlight ! . There is "nothing " gray abo
    3 points
  21. Done. I tried all the caps and they fit just fine but this was a serious tension inducing job. Now I'll make the studs. Interestingly, I had a bit of a search to find grade 5 castellated nuts. The grade 2's are available everywhere but it is desirable to match the nut to the stud or bolt. I'm making the studs out of Stressproof which has just about the same tensile strength as grade 5. With four 7/16 studs on each cap there is no need to go to grade 8 - the original bolts were about as hard as soap. The only holes I'm not putting inserts in are those for the studs that
    3 points
  22. Hre are some pics of my first foray into 1/6 scale scratch building. The engine from my '36 Dodge.
    3 points
  23. Can I be forgiven for 3D printing a model of my 1932 Studebaker Indy car replica? It’s 10 inches long, took 3 days to print. It’s detailed right down to the rivet heads. I guess I should paint it. I remember building plastic models of cars from the ‘teens when I was a kid. The wheels were placed on the axles and a lit match was held to the end of the spindle to soften the plastic and make a mushroom to retain the wheel. None of those survived my high school years.
    3 points
  24. Been getting a lot of work done on the truck. Chassis got rolled out an power washed, added front motor mount and other small item. Been doing a ton of blasting, priming, and painting. Rebuilt the starter, generator, and half done on the distributor. On another thread in another forum category,there was a discussion about how many “full” restorations concentrate more on the appearance of the car and less on the mechanics as cars are judged mainly on their looks. While I like a vehicle to look good, I also like it to drive as good or better so I go through all those mechanical components like
    3 points
  25. Today's update in photos. He now expects the car to be ready for me to pick it up on Friday.
    3 points
  26. I purchased a parts lot that were removed from a 1925 Standard coupe destined to be street-rodded. The entire engine driveline plus the seats and all. Along with this came a "mystery box" mostly full of 1925 Master Parts. I sprung for this because there were the 22" wheels which sometime in the past mine were changed out to 21". The owner started to restore the car but changed his mind. He also bought 5 new 600X22 tires tubes and flaps. Everything had to come as a package deal. Unfortunately it was located in Bend Oregon. Enter Mark Shaw from Vanc
    2 points
  27. If you don't read the Buick General forum, you may have missed Lamar's post in which he tells everyone about a performance add-on from O'Reilly Auto Parts Rare Parts Group. Find the O'Reilly's website and search for part 121g. I think it would definitely improve the performance of any Riviera, but especially the 68 - 69's 430. Ed
    2 points
  28. I drove my Crosley convertible at the Crosley Club National meet without a windshield and my eyes would tear up if I drove too fast. I told my wife goggles would help! PS. The Buick looks great, have fun putting it together. You should have it done in no time with the stay at home orders...
    2 points
  29. Stuart-Turner launch engine built from S-T kit of raw materials. Kit came from the James Bliss Co. on Atlantic Ave in Boston. Simple marine engine with Stevenson reversing gear, 7/8" bore x 1" stroke. Also built a Scotch Marine boiler to power it. The steam launch it was intended for has never materialized.
    2 points
  30. Got back to it today. Tried adding the battery to see what lights would work. Turns out - none. This harness has so much resistance, it's sucking up all the power within itself. About 3v loss on the big wire between the voltage regulator and the solenoid. This goes through the ammeter, but I checked no detectable loss through the ammeter itself. On the smaller wires out to the front marker lights, voltage is almost nothing. Ordered a new harness from Studebaker Int'l, and started backing this one out. Hopefully their harness has a couple more pounds of copper than this one. Got the dash disass
    2 points
  31. After thinking about it a bit, I guess that just getting the headliner replaced would go a long way towards making the interior less off-putting. Headliners are their own fabric, anyway, so matching it later with seat fabric wouldn't be an issue. The way it currently is, I have to think would be like driving around under storm clouds. Maybe later on, the door panels.
    2 points
  32. Hi Folks - I've seen the car and I believe it is in great mechanical shape with recent work that has been done. The body is sound - no obvious rust problems. You could repaint it if you like or just drive it and enjoy it as is. I agree that the interior is not to my taste BUT having said that, this car will tour and drive all day long as is. If you want to have fun with an Airflow this is a great place to start. And as dpcdfan has noted, the Airflow Club offers tremendous support for these beautiful cars.
    2 points
  33. I think I like the styling in the photo I posted better than the original. The fins on the original look wimpy. The sloped roof & back glass in my post are more stylish IMHO. Either way, I wouldn't kick it out of my garage.
    2 points
  34. Until about ten years ago, the special bearings were able to be sourced......today, they seem to be all gone. Often we change the box and worm over to an available modern bearing........if it can be done. Usually on Gemmer boxes, we machine the box and install Torrington roller bearings where the bushings were used originally. Makes for a much better steering box, but adds cost and time to the project. We also machine the entire box for modern seals, so when we are finished we run ATF as a lubricant..........steers like a dream after a total overhaul with added bearings.
    2 points
  35. I ran across this ad going through some of my materials while cleaning my office at home.
    2 points
  36. No fooling. I have one of those magnification lamps mounted to the side of my Bridgeport milling machine so I can see the little stuff I'm machining clearly. Dandy Dave!
    2 points
  37. In a few short years that car will look like one of Ed's parts cars. A talented, patient hobbyist could do a driver restoration on it, but doesn't sound like it will happen. For around 25 or 30 years I, along with others watched a 57 Chevy Nomad, restorable but needing it all, steadilly deteriorate in a yard here in CT. Guy thought he had a retirement fund, and built a fence around it so folks would stop asking about it. Maybe 10 years ago, I think it was hauled away and likely parted out... That story resonated a lot in looking at that thread...
    2 points
  38. Here's some shots of one of my current projects: model of my son's 1975 Chevy C65 dump. Box is scratch built, frame and cab came from donor kits. cab needs alot of work to adapt it to the larger truck. Lots of work on the hood and fenders as this truck has the tilting hood. In fitting this, I found that the frame was a tad too long so it had to be shortened. Working to bring together 2 different scales into 1 model is tricky.
    2 points
  39. Interior Stearns Knight 1928 Town Cabriolet Brunn
    2 points
  40. The light colored car in the distance has a defined front fender outline, a fully skirted rear fender wheel cutout, and a sharply tapered rear outline, and appears to be a coupe', possibly a convertible- but just not enough in focus for my old eyes to get enough detail. The tall, and sweet looking young lady appears content with her Buick Super, and we assume her friend went into the bushes to do nothing more than to snap her photo in this lovely setting. We've driven Tioga pass with several of our cars in the past few years, the '88 Vet
    2 points
  41. Another addition to my personal color slide archive of classic automobiles. Pictured below is a 1963 Riviera sitting in a residence driveway. Location and slide processing date are unknown. @Turbinator I know you are digging those wheel covers! 🤩
    2 points
  42. Gorgeous 1954 Buick Century parked at the "Casa Linda" Motel in Daytona Beach, FL. Image is from an udated 1950's or 1960's color slide in my personal archive.
    2 points
  43. California is trying to figure out how to put a warning sign on air. They’ve discovered that if you breathe it all your life, you die.....
    2 points
  44. On the subject of model-making, there's a museum here in Canton, Ohio, the Ernest Warther Museum, that I first learned about while on a tour with the 36-38 Buick Club. Turns out, he was the world's most extraordinary wood carver, and not just stuff like tiki columns and little black bears. Even though it's not automotive-related, I found his work remarkable. Warther traced the entire history of steam railroading using models carved from ebony, ivory, bone, and other materials. I initially thought it would be ordinary stuff but when I saw the extent of this man's talent, I was absolutely blown
    2 points
  45. How much do I have to pay you to not send it! Back to some work - not on the Humberette I am sorry to say, but at least I am having some fun actually managing to do a bit in the workshop, even if it is for only an hour or so. I found my spirit level and checked the Bridgeport milling table for level. Firstly front to back of the mill That's not far out at all. Then I checked it side to side. That is out, it needs to be higher on the left of the machine. I rang my pal Robert and he has
    2 points
  46. I did get photos of the cars i bought at a distance and bought it taking the gamble. The vette had excellent photos, literally over 100 of it on a lift. The Cord had a few cell phone close ups that were crappy and the Auburn had a few far away shots. The Dodge Roadster I only got a couple of photos of and they weren't good. It's just the level of risk you are willing to take. (remember rarely will you ever lose every penny on a car you paid for it as Matt said) I could still have a near boat anchor under the hood of my Auburn but I was willing to take the risk. Figure the worst, hope for
    2 points
  47. Aw Shucks guys...; I'm just trying to keep more old Buicks on the road... Thanks!
    2 points
  48. I've seen much more expensive cars with much worse interiors. I also think that at that price, doing the interior correctly would come pretty close to paying for itself. Airflows are hot right now and while that's not an Imperial or a coupe or a '34, they still seem to be on the short list of pre-war non-Classics that are still ticking upwards instead of downwards. Overdue, in my opinion. They remain great cars to drive.
    2 points
  49. Model Builders? Now that's a loaded question. Here's a stationary Steam engine I built at the Tech Center in high school. 7 flues in the boiler. Double acting oscillating type. Boiler fires on propane.
    2 points
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