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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/21/2020 in all areas

  1. 45 degrees in Mass today. Perfect for 94 year old guys to drive their cars.
    5 points
  2. Suddenly I wish I wasn't slung so under.
    5 points
  3. Kids fed and happily ignoring me: Dads garage is more interesting, warmer, and I have some parts to box up there.
    5 points
  4. Here is my 1931 Reo Royale Victoria 8 - 31 before I started on the wood rebuilding which all has to be replaced right down to the sills. There is only a few of these 8 - 31 known to survive. A Royale in a forest metal rotted out. [ middle picture ] A Royale member in Alaska saved this Royale [ bottom picture } and had it shipped to his home.
    5 points
  5. I know this probably doesn't directly have anything to do with Buicks but it does have to do with my Daughter Sarah who was at the 100th in Flint and at least 2 BDE meets over the years. She is a true Buick lover and is currently on an underway aboard the USS San Jacinto with the task force led by the USS Eisenhower. I am very proud of her for so many reasons and she sent me a message the other day saying that since leaving they have not been allowed to touch land. They will probably not see any port visits until at least May so I asked her what she would like me to send in the way of things they might like. Today we went shopping and sent her a couple care packages. Thank goodness they give a discount on military addresses. I used to have a picture of her following me driving my 1955 Buick Special while we were on a poker run. You could see her smile a mile away and she drove that car when ever she had a chance manual steering and brakes no problem. I had planned on making her peanut butter cookies but I got home yesterday afternoon and have to leave today with a load of meat to Indianapolis so no time this time I am home. Maybe next time,
    4 points
  6. 4 points
  7. This just showed up in today's Toronto Sun chain of papers
    4 points
  8. This is a tough position! Let me start from the end. There are no affordable hobbies. Even gardening can be expensive. But it helps to focus on something that brings you joy. 40 is a scary time. For many it is a perception that things are moving forward while perhaps you think you are stagnant. Or maybe an awakening to one's mortality, and that there may not be enough time to accomplish what you want to do. But from my experience it is actually a time when magic happens. You may suddenly realize that opportunities exist and you're qualified to step into them. Things can happen fast, so regardless of how you currently feel, keep your eyes open and be available. Examine the "doesn't bring me joy" comment. Is it just related to Buttercup? Or the other assets too? I worked with a fellow who was heavy into old cars. I never did see his collection but was led to believe he had 3 cars all fully restored. We used to talk at work and one day he told me that he had grown tired of the cars and decided to let em all go. It was a bad decision. Several years later he missed the whole thing and then found it was hard to replace what he had. He told me " hang on to what you have!" Even if you are tired of it, just put it on the side. These were wise words. If you are truly tired of the cars, do what needs to be done to store em best you can. And wait a few years to make sure you really do not want them before letting them go. Also consider what each vehicle really needs, and then build a plan that will allow you to refurbish what has to be done on each to advance your enjoyment of them. Big projects and little ones. One year I just replaced the outside mirrors and the gas tank door guard on the '56 and I was done for that year. Make it a multi year plan. It's okay. Nothing has to be finished in a day. You have put a lot of time and effort into Buttercup to bring her back. You have restored her inner and outer beauty. It is okay to take a break from it for a while. But I think it is best to keep her running, even if not driving it locally, now that you have gone as far as you have with it. .
    4 points
  9. Ted, I love the work on the truck. This forum is a great way to take a break from the stress and reality of the 24/7 news about the virus. It is important that we should all be informed, but we also need time to stop and breathe, and this is the place to go. Thanks, John
    4 points
  10. 4 points
  11. I do not think a lack of interest in mechanics is surprising. The only aspect of restoration that is consistently rewarded is cosmetics.
    4 points
  12. I believe a main reason for this is no one seems to have the same idea what a restoration is. There’s no actual definition as far as our car hobby goes. What Joe might think is a full restoration, might be half of what Bob might consider a restoration. I do not understand though how those basic three that you mention, and I’ll add another, safe, aren’t a priority with anyone who restores a vehicle. If anyone looks at my restoration thread, you will see that I go completely through the front axle with all its components making all like brand new. King pins are always fully checked and even if just a tiny bit worn, replaced. Brakes checked adjusted, transmissions fully disassembled and rebuilt along with all the accompanying components, replaced when needed. Motors checked by opening up the pan, compression checks, regasketed, valves adjusted, etc. I also rebuild or replace any questionable wood, check body to frame mounts/bolts , replace gas to safety glass, add third brake lights, wire in directional switches, have headlight reflectors aluminized. Of course I suggest some of these things and it’s up to the owner what actually gets done. To me a true restoration is everything is touched, everything. Anything less i consider a freshening, repairs, updates, etc. but that’s my idea of a restoration.
    4 points
  13. I am a new member after recently acquiring what I believe is a factory 1929 Studebaker 8 Roadster. My extensive search has not resulted in finding any factory RHD models of this model. Could anyone identify the origins or any information relating to this vehicle ?
    3 points
  14. Happened to run across this while on Youtube, not sure if I ever posted it, has it really been seven years since I retired. A bit personal but definitely Buick related. Lil Rivi-Airhead. Sure miss these folks. Watch all the way through to see why everyone's arms go in the air. Buick Power
    3 points
  15. Most people here know I have had a desire to own a 1990 select 60. Well, not exactly a select 60 but check it out, I just purchased this car. For you Corvette fans it's a 1964, 327/300 HP #s matching car with a Muncie 4 speed transmission, AM/FM radio, both hard top and soft top in white, trim tag 936/491DE identifies it as correct white car with two tone white/red interior and knock off wheels. The word of the day is thrilled!!🥂🇺🇸😎
    3 points
  16. There is an attorney , an AACA member, who specializes in this kind of problem in the area. I you need his help happy to pass along his info.
    3 points
  17. I had the Model T out briefly today, but no pictures. But since photos from prior events seem to be welcome on this thread, here are a couple of Stanley shots. One was taking firing up on a misty dawn at the HCCA 1-and 2-cylinder tour last September on the eastern shore of the Chesapeake. The other was taken arriving at the coffee stop at a real cars and coffee on a very cold fall day about a year and a half ago.
    3 points
  18. My winter garage is a table in our sunroom. Here are some recent garage projects. I really enjoy the posts of the real cars, this was great idea.
    3 points
  19. 1965 Cadillac upper headlamp bezel....
    3 points
  20. Things are still pretty quiet up here. The '25 Buick has been run recently. The '29 McLaughlin and '21 Chevy are ready to run. Sometimes it's nice just to go out and "visit". The half doors in front of the "29 are for the latest stablemate,a 1999 Jeep TJ Sahara. They are a rare commodity here in rust free or unmodified condition.This one spent it's life in BC and Arizona,with many of it's miles logged up behind a big motorhome. While not a recognized collector vehicle yet, I feel it's worth preserving. Besides,I just like Jeeps,pre-2007. It remains to be seen if there will be any place to drive to this year. Hoping all will stay safe and healthy. Jim
    3 points
  21. I said before that they will be older pictures... The 1928 A phaeton was sold to someone in northern Vermont, and my 1929 roadster wound up in Switzerland shortly before moving from Maine to North Carolina. My 26 T is being stored in a friends garage while I have the Pierce engine apart in my small 2-car garage but gets out occasionally even though the traffic here is terrible for the 35MPH driving! And my “newest” toy is a 1931 Pierce-Arrow, which is pretty much out for the count as the place making my new pistons is in California... That later A is a friends car that I was helping sort. His son is hanging over the hood in a staged breakdown.
    3 points
  22. Don the roof framing was completely gone and I did not have any patterns only a picture of the wood framing a Royale member gave me. I designed my own roof wood framing with the arc and chamber made from cardboard templates. Luckily the other wood was good enough to use as patterns. The tricky part was trying put the wood sills exactly into their position under the sheet metal sides of the car. I had made a jig up for reference so it was just time consuming positioning the body on the sills. The wood trouble was caused by the car been stored outside in Utah where they get lots of snow and the snow melts and trickles into all the wood framing. You are right the metal is in very good shape and where they leaded the car together it is still solid. Mark
    3 points
  23. Good Morning Everyone, first cup of coffee is on hand and here's what I decided to bring out today, not totally free from it's winter slumber but the sun is shining here so maybe a run around the block later
    3 points
  24. Its curved to match the top piece. Keeps the wires in line.. ill get ya a picture with some dimentions later today... John.
    3 points
  25. Tonight I finished making my battery cables. I grounded the battery to the frame as original and also to the transmission. Added an electrical cutoff switch in the positive line to the starter.
    3 points
  26. To our valued members: The AACA and its affiliates are monitoring issues related to the coronavirus (COVID-19) as well as abiding by the CDC and other governmental agency recommendations. Our members are our utmost concern and we will make notifications as necessary should our events or operations be affected in any way. The AACA office and Library is now back to work in the building but due to Covid and a consolidation of all staff to the library portion of our building by June 30 we are keeping the building locked and not allowing guests for the time being. We will be monitoring the CDC guidelines along with the Governor's mandates as we maneuver through these troubling times. We will make changes to our operations based upon the safety of our staff and guests alike as circumstances allow. There WILL be some disruption of our services to members as we are already dealing with materials stored in 7 locations in town. A lot of items are simply buried in storage lockers until we move into the new building. Our staff is working under very difficult condition's with a move out by the 30th, working in temporary locations, learning a complex new phone system (which when we learn it, it will be GREAT) and migrating to a new IT company by June 30th. We packed years of work into a few months. Please bear with us as we navigate this unusual time. AACA National Board of Directors, Steve and the Entire Team
    3 points
  27. I saw this fabulous slide at a site I discovered on facebook and figured this one needed to be here. The full title of the slide is Street Scene, Saskatoon Credit Union Federation 9th Annual Convention held at Watrous, Saskatchewan, Canada on June 23, 1947. Cars aren't the main subject matter but there are HUNDREDS of well done late 40's/50's slides there >>> https://everettbakerslides.smugmug.com/Photography I went through only the first of 4 albums.
    2 points
  28. Wow , just viewed every photo posted, loved it , great window on history , not just the cars , the people , the style and the ambiance of some of the scenes. So many spectacular and interesting cars and so many I loved , be unfair to chose a favourite. Many thanks to all the posters stay safe pilgrim
    2 points
  29. This morning me and my son decided to take out the crawlers this morning. Good times. Planning on working on the Merc tomorrow since the weather is getting better.
    2 points
  30. Hi Phil... found it.... John
    2 points
  31. We have a similar shirt in Arizona except it has a outline of state of California in red with the hammer and sickle and says " Don't let this happen to our state"
    2 points
  32. For my Packard friends: Caption: View of motorists in 1934 Packard Twelve convertible participating in Decoration Day parade at Winnetka, Illinois. Two boys ride bicycles next to car; Tudor style house in background. Handwritten on back: "Decoration Day parade, Winnetka, Ill. 1934 Packard Twelve, Eleventh Series, Model 1107. 12 cy., 160 b.h.p., 142" whb., phaeton ~ 4 pass. (body-type #731)."
    2 points
  33. Yesterday I took three cars out to get their annual New York State inspection. I was complying to a New York State regulation. And I had to bring all the fluids up to operating temperature to drive off any condensed water vapor. Besides. they have been pointing their finger at my tailpipe telling me my exhaust depletes the ozone layer. I'm pretty sure UV rays will kill a virus and Spring is here. Huh, more sun, more UV. Maybe there is a connection with that term "cold and flu season". Nah, only Orson Welles would think like that.
    2 points
  34. Go ahead and drive. What they are trying to stop is social gatherings where people might pass an infection around. If you want to go someplace what's the diff how old the car is? Do your shopping, or just go out and enjoy the breeze. If you get a ticket it would make an interesting court case if all they have on you is they don't like the age of your car.
    2 points
  35. For that reason alone that cup is worth more than the contents of the garage
    2 points
  36. Cheers to that cup! And the shop is pretty darn nice as well! Don
    2 points
  37. Isn't that high priced "patina"?
    2 points
  38. Good morning all you early and late risers. My cuppa comes form a local coffee roasters company "Just Us", and I prefer their Italian grind, specs for tasting notes say "high roast, high body, low acidity"! The '31 Chevrolet is a Special Coach, a term used in Canada for Deluxe models, has side-mounts, cowl lights etc, currently self -quarantined! The '31 Chrysler CD8 Roadster is in for minor repairs, should be finished in a year or so. To prove I am up to date, here interestingly enough is today's local paper which I picked up at end of driveway this am while out photographing the cars. You guessed it, front page photo of a woods find car! Anyone able to name it before K31 gets to it? Enjoy.
    2 points
  39. Mark, I've got a 30 AA Ford Truck that I have to do the same thing with. I've been sort of putting off the wood work as I really want to think it through before I take anything apart and scarf in new pieces. The big problem is it's a Canadian built chassis with a custom cab from an unknown builder so all I have to work with is the original pieces. We definitely know that it's Canadian from the Robertson screws used in it and suspect the cab may have been built at Brantford Coachbuilders. Don
    2 points
  40. Hi Phil... Heres the best I can do on short notice, as I am conducting corona research..... The piece in question looks something like this.. you may have to adjust side notches to match wire thickness. Also the edge is flared to match the piece you have to prevent chafing on wires.. hope this helps.. John
    2 points
  41. Dave I only met him once but boy did this man leave a lasting impression on me His knowledge and wisdom was beyond words Mpgp 1999 I was told that they had a private cremation Very low key and that's how he would have wanted it to be I don't think that his wife can open his computer She knows that he contributed to these forums but seeing he was a computer wiz he most probably had some cryptic password I have asked John Post to pass on our sympathies That's about all one can do
    2 points
  42. Touts, You need to tell us where you are and how you came by the car............. "Extensive research " ? = where, how, when, who ? We would love to help, but right now we are flying blind............. Mike in Colorado
    2 points
  43. On the one hand, you're right, it's a terminology problem. But in the real world, the number of shops qualified to actually do what you're calling a "restoration" can probably be counted on two hands. The rest are mostly cleaning and repainting parts. The problem is that most people don't really know the difference. For instance, I had a 1957 Chevy come into my shop a few years ago that was festooned with every award a car can win, including AACA Grand National First Prize. I mean, it was the very definition of "trailer queen." It was certainly lovely. It had a dual quad motor that didn't seem to be as snappy as it should, so we started going through it to see if it was set up correctly. When we checked the timing, we discovered that the harmonic balancer was loose on the crank snout. And not only was it loose, but the shop that did the work KNEW it was loose and instead of fixing it, they just drilled a hole and used a set screw to hold it in place. WTF? Check it out: As soon as we found that, we started digging through the rest of the car and discovered that almost nothing had been "rebuilt" or "repaired" or "replaced" or even "adjusted." They simply took the car apart, cleaned and painted/plated every part, then put it back together. Everything we touched, the thing next to it broke, too. The former owner, a fairly knowledgeable Corvette guy, never knew the difference because he never drove it farther than on and off a trailer. He paid six figures for the restoration that could have been done by a high school shop class, and I bet more than a few of you have heard of this shop that did the work. Nobody would have known had I not started driving the car and my butt dyno decided it just wasn't right. I'm guessing that the only reason I noticed is because I'm picky and I drive a lot of cars. An average hobbyist? Meh, obviously not. We ended up spending about $12,000 to fix the important stuff on that car, including a fresh motor (it had some kind of circle track cam in it and the rear carb was disabled--no wonder it ran like crap). I offered to help him sue the restorer, but the guy was dying of cancer or something and my client didn't have the heart to go after him. I suppose there was no punishment we could visit on him that was worse than that. Anyway, my point is that an experienced car guy paid a reputable shop a lot of money to do a terrible job, and nobody ever noticed. What's worse, I bet the shop that did the work considered themselves restorers, not hacks and certainly not crooks. I bet anyone but me driving it would have thought, "Well, it's old, that's just how they were. And boy, isn't it shiny!" Wayne Carini surely knows the difference, but he's still subject to the same problem as the rest of us: 98% of old cars are rife with issues so "good" becomes a very relative term. Great cars are rare and they're only great because someone who knew better went through and fixed it (and spent a ton of money they'll never get back doing it). Everyone else seems to not really know or care because there's just no basis for comparison. I have to believe that Wayne fixed that car before passing it on, but maybe not--he probably knows that whomever bought it at the auction is just going to put it in some mega-collection in a warehouse and they'll never have enough seat time to experience the problem. That's probably not a bad gamble at all... So yes, terminology is a problem. But the real problem is that most folks just don't have a frame of reference because, of course, few of us are old enough to have experienced any of these cars when they were new. With that in mind, it shouldn't be a surprise that most old cars drive like crap--because nobody can tell the difference and most cars aren't driven enough to find the flaws. And many of the same guys who own the cars own the shops that restore them--do they know any better or do they just assume good enough is good enough? Is there a degree of difficulty where they just stop (like rebuilding a steering box rather than just filling it with thicker grease)? As with many things in this life, ignorance, willful or otherwise, is the problem.
    2 points
  44. Well, The photo was taken on State Street in Ludlow Mass, my hometown of fifty years. I can tell you if the Packard exists, I have never seen it. I have heard a rumor of a similar vehicle in New England, but can not prove it’s veracity.
    2 points
  45. 2 points
  46. In some ways maybe but man at all the things I thought I would have accomplished/completed and or gotten to by now. Advice to those approaching retirement, double the dollars that you think you will need and divide by two the projects you plan to accomplish... you'll still likely come out short on both though.
    2 points
  47. This was last Sunday: A most pleasurable task was accomplished today. I woke my Model T up from its’ winter nap and prepared it for the coming driving season.My son stepped right up and offered to take it for a shakedown cruise. I planned on being the copilot until the queen of their household pulled rank on me. Needless to say Grandpa was a pushover! Veronica is looking forward to learning to drive a Model T when she is tall enough.
    2 points
  48. Yes! I watched it a few times. If I recall correctly, it was right after they talked about how the car was so well sorted and drove so well.
    2 points
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