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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/15/2020 in all areas

  1. I acquired this car along with several early Chrysler product cars. The Buick has been parked in an enclosed shed since the early 1970s and is the proverbial "barn find." 1931 featured Buick’s first 8 cylinder engine and this was one of 1078 roadsters built. The engine turns over, but I didn’t try to start it. Equipped with a rare factory accessory stone guard. The Buick appears to be wearing it’s original paint. The car is 99% complete and comes with a 1951 California title. Car is super solid and straight with no rust, but needs some wood replaced below the door sills. I’m a Chrysler guy and
    6 points
  2. Later in the day, I decided to primer the front valance panel and see how it looks (Photo 2). It certainly turned out better than I thought it would, with my limited hammering and metal skills. It's far better than where it started, looking like a pretzel, but it's not quite there yet, not ready for prime time. Still has some issues from the metal being effectively folded and it has some contour inconsistencies. I think "good enough" may work eventually, as you can't really see this piece when the car is together, but I don't think it's good enough yet. I'll set it aside and revisit. I ma
    5 points
  3. back at it now totally repaired the body , ordered many new parts an spent the last 3 months redoing the body on weekends an theres finally a light at the end of this tunnel of nightmares , my god the sins I removed from the body of this roadmaster. that poor car had poor owners an just out right bad owners . everything rotten was cut out an replaced , heres a few pics of how bad it was right up to were its at right now with only a few mechanical issues to repair an then finally the repainting can begin .
    5 points
  4. Yes, and this story may sound made up but it is 100% true. About 15 years ago I sold my 1937 Dodge 1/2 pickup through an ad in our local farming related newspaper based in Lancaster county PA. The ad got me many responses and lookers. One very interested person was an older gentleman from about 35 miles away who was very anxious to come and see the truck. He showed up at the time he said he would be there and came driving a 1966 Chrysler that looked in really good shape. Turns out he was in his late 60s and a real fan of Chrysler products. He also said he needed a new project to take hi
    4 points
  5. I am replacing the rear carpet and had the my 1913 Buick model 31 outside, weather was cool, calm and dry, too nice to pass our first drive of 2020. Regards, Gary
    4 points
  6. X2 on the recore of the original radiator. While pricing that out consider going one row wider for greater cooling capacity, unless you're already at the max core width. Bumped my 56 from a 2 row to a 3 row, and my 69 from a three row to a 4 row. The extra cost stung up front but decades later I hardly remember it.
    4 points
  7. Thanks for the tips and encouragement, gentlemen! Saturday was a pretty good day out in the garage. I got the hood in primer, so it is now ready for a final sanding, I think, before paint (Photos 1 & 2). I'll be putting all the hardware back on today, as these parts were originally painted as installed on the car. I'll be setting it aside and continuing on the trunk lid. Want to try to get the hood, trunk lid, and doors in primer before I tackle the body, although it will probably be delayed due to pollen season. Hood turned out very nice overall.
    4 points
  8. Completely cleaned out the steering box and checked it all out. Bearings were good, pitman shaft bushing was good, the worm and sector gear was also so a new coat gasket was made and it was reassembled. Using the offset nut and offset bolt, both got turned to tighten the sector gear as close as possible to the worm with no binding through full travel of the box. The play is taken up with the worm and sector in the dead center of range of rotation as the box is designed to be basically play free only in this position. As the shaft is rotated in either direction from center, play increases sligh
    4 points
  9. Bill, What's wrong with floors patched from STOP signs? LOL We had them in Brooklyn, NY and as I remember, they worked quite well unless you tried to drive through deep water. The Alternate Side of the Street parking signs were good for the backseat floorboards also. Thanks for reminding me!
    4 points
  10. The Aqua Zephyr at Hendricks Stadium, Fort Bragg, North Carolina. The fruit trees are in bloom! Luckily, in this picture, you can't see the fine layer of pollen all over the AZ. 😢 🥵🤭
    4 points
  11. Assembly is underway. Note the NOS Delco front brake shoes. I also have NOS front aluminum drums that are going on it (I will probably never find another pair). Also fitted with NOS ball joints.
    4 points
  12. Been a while since I posted here, but I recently had my shop manager and detailer, Michael, spend some serious time on the Chrysler. It was invited to a big indoor show this weekend (https://www.pistonpowershow.com/) as part of what they're calling the "long roof" display. Michael wet sanded and buffed the paint and to be honest, it looks spectacular. It's hard to tell in photos, especially since the car has always looked pretty vivid, but the color is much deeper and bolder than it used to be. It always looked kind of washed out but it now looks as good in person as it does in photos. I'm rea
    4 points
  13. *SOLD* I was completely blindsided by how much I dig this big brute of an Oldsmobile. It rolled in the same day as a freshly restored Superbird and as soon as I saw the Olds, I was like, "Superbird who?" This car has SWAGGER. It also has a very cool story, not the least of which is the fact that it's the first 1969 Hurst/Olds built (George Hurst's personal car was #3). It is very extensively documented, including original purchase documents plus a copy of the window sticker and paperwork from Demmer Engineering, who were actually the guys who built these cars. The story is entertaining, too. A
    3 points
  14. Yes, cascade blue. I’m doing this one bone stock since it’s a well preserved 71 GS. Toughest decision was keeping the vinyl top.
    3 points
  15. 3 points
  16. I like your plan and I think it will work great. I'm not sure what the body shop environment is like where you are but for me it made it impossible to find a place for paint. Everything around me is a chain, high end... but still a chain and they don't do custom work as it is new (less than 10 years old) cars and insurance work only. It was recommended to me (by Barry at SPI) to find an independent show car painter and that those guys would have a deal in place with a body shop that let them rent it for a project. This is not only a little cheaper, but you get a guy that's really good and
    3 points
  17. 3 points
  18. It took an awful long time to fabricate those 2 tiny bearing guiding the brake shafts. They are small and, even if I had not fat fingers, I had some difficulties to grab them for "machining". Then, to adjust them to have a free rotation of the shafts was a matter of trial and error. And, finally, by soldering the bearing (a simple tube with the proper dimensions) to the support, I had the bad surprise that everything was soldered: bearing, support and shaft! On the second bearing, I thought that I had the perfect solution: I used a cleaned drill bit to simulate the shaft; the solder found it
    3 points
  19. Still lots to do but it’s looking a lot more like a car:). Fitted the front seat base - not sure how the seat backs go though - the rear one should be hinges at the bottom so I guess it just screws to a wood backing panel?
    3 points
  20. Thank you Ted, I have the same feelings for the guys I have 'met' on this forum. All of you please keep safe as the virus is now spreading quickly in the western world. I seem to be much better now, hopefully this feeling will last and I can get on with some work. Mike
    3 points
  21. I've made a fair amount of progress on the walls for the booth. The original plan was to have a 1' tall mini-wall that hung down from the ceiling and then attach 8'x4' sheets of Coroplast (corrugated plastic) to that and duct tape it all together. I made the 1' panels and installed them in the ceiling and that worked well. The 8'x4' sheets did work hanging from the mounting panels but it was too flimsy. The panels I made for the top really turned out great... lightweight, easy to work with. As such I decided I needed to just build 8'x4' panels for the lower section. For the upper panels
    3 points
  22. I spent today tweaking my still wet dash and glove box door. I dismantled the radio. I have neither the cash nor the desire to spend hundreds to get an AM radio restored. Instead, I’ve gutted the radio box (many of the internals were damaged, I’m not the first to poke around) and will put a small car speaker (or two) in there. I’ll leave all the controls and plates for looks. I’ll run a small marine Bluetooth amplifier in the radio box with the speakers on a 6 to 12v converter. I cleaned and painted the speaker faceplate and mocked up the dash. I also spent some time on the lucite wings. I
    3 points
  23. Just finished a Faux American-Bosch magneto switch face plate. The vehicle this is going into originally had a American-Bosch switch. However, years ago when the motor was swapped out they changed it to a distributor and modern key ignition. This will adapt to it and give it somewhat of an original appearance. and provide a use for those screw holes in the dash panel. On another note my students successfully ran all the CNC setups for the Vesta headlight hinges. They used machinable wax for this run. Next will be for keeps in brass. They ar
    3 points
  24. Ken: There is a screw with a long slot that threads into the L bracket to locate the band by pushing against the band with the thread adjusting in relationship to the L shaped bracket riveted to the backing plate. Keeping position bey the spring pressure. Once adjusted the cotter pin is inserted. Also notice spring in-between. Parts you need are 169132 and Spring169131. I had to make them up for my friends 1919 H-45. He was driving the car for over 20 years with out this one brake being able to be useable as he was missing the same adjusting screw. And th
    3 points
  25. ROA member Bob Reed and I attending BCA Tarheel Buick Club cruise to Fort Bragg, North Carolina 82nd Airborne Division museum today. The BCA's Tarheel Buick Club chapter visited the museum and had lunch at an on base golf course. .
    3 points
  26. I am not sure what part of this photo is the best.
    3 points
  27. Our copy finally arrived- Great article on Reggie Nash and his '09 Rambler. It was an absolute privilege and a "forever" memory, that Reggie had me drive this gem for a complete day when the Reliability tour was based in Ashland, VA several years back. The four-speed transmission has an unusual pattern which took some getting used to. Their granddaughter Alex, even at a young age, was a "pro" at handling the '09 Rambler, and even pitched in to change a tire when another participant's car had a puncture. Reggie and Cyndi are generous and delightful examples of what our hobby can be,
    3 points
  28. I'll bet that does really well. And why do people always have to mention "Jay Leno" whenever they see a prewar car for sale? It screams to me somebody that knows jack about cars.
    2 points
  29. One is for sale now 1913 Rauch & Lang Electric Open Roadster Location: Wellington, Nevada 89444 This 1913 Rauch & Lang Electric Open Roadster is said to have spent time in Briggs Cunningham’s automotive museum in Costa Mesa, California, prior to being sold into another private collection. It was purchased in 1988 by the seller’s father, who used it as a promotional vehicle at his theme park, the Ponderosa Ranch in Incline Village, Nevada. The car has reportedly remained in storage since the theme park closed in 2004. An 80-volt Hertner el
    2 points
  30. No......you get a crankshaft rumble..........rod knock noise is distinctive.
    2 points
  31. Never a big concern of mine when I wanted a car. If I got in too deep I can always sell them. I have had a lot of cars I didn't marry.... and only one wife. If I hadn't kept that balance I may not have had as many cars. I have hung out with a couple of local doctors who were into old cars. One thing we found somewhat in common. They could take one look at a guy walking into their office and pretty much know the condition. I'm about the same with cars.
    2 points
  32. It is too bad it is such a mess; it sure doesn’t look it from the pictures, of course. Looking closer there does seem to be some other interior issues. The inserts inside the cup holders are missing, the trim for the front of the passenger seat mount is laying in the floor, and the pictures of the console lid show it open. That could be a latch problem, or something else, I’m not sure. If the supercharger is just “rattling,” that could just be the “coupler.” That is not a difficult fix, and the part is usually around $30. Was the steering problem at low speeds, or somet
    2 points
  33. I acquired this car along with several early Chrysler product cars. The Buick has been parked in an enclosed shed since the early 1970s. 1931 featured Buick’s first 8 cylinder engine and this was one of 1078 roadsters built. The engine turns over, but I didn’t try to start it. Equipped with a rare factory accessory stone guard. The Buick appears to be wearing it’s original paint. The car is 99% complete and comes with a 1951 California title. Car is super solid and straight with no rust, but needs some wood replaced below the door sills. I’m a Chrysler guy and not at all familiar with early Bu
    2 points
  34. Can’t wait to see this but with a black background
    2 points
  35. Another Blocking and sanding Sunday! At least the right rear fender is done.
    2 points
  36. I'll travel through Indian territory with my top down to get there. Nuts, that was last year!
    2 points
  37. First observation from your video is that the head has consistent temps front to rear. If there was an imbalance in the engine causing the temp differential in the headers I would think that would be reflected in the head temp at the back. So, the 2nd observation from the video is that there is less airflow at the back of the engine likely due to the length of the motor and the presence of the all the peripheals between the front two header leads and the rearmost header leads. The 3rd observation deals with the whine. That doesnt sound like the waterpump from my viewing window. I wonde
    2 points
  38. Regarding the exhaust temps, I think you might be worrying needlessly. Every engine feeds cylinders unevenly; dyno tests have shown that there can be a one point difference in air/fuel ratios from one cylinder to the other. Jetting will not change your idle EGTs. You aren't running on the main jets until the car's going at least 40 mph, so you'd have to increase the size of the idle jet, which would really have to be accomplished by pin drills, and then you're in "you had better know what you're doing" territory. Check for vacuum leaks, and set the idle mixture screws based on
    2 points
  39. If you get a charge of air/fuel in a cylinder by cranking, and fire the ignition manually, the engine may start itself. My 1913 Studebaker is set up to do that, but I have only seen it work once. My starting method on a normal day is a lot more like what Tinindian posted. Here are some guys starting the Blitzen Benz by firing the ignition. 1909, Four cylinders, 1312(!) cubic inches.
    2 points
  40. If the ignition and fuel is sorted no problem. If engine is cold. Four cylinder or six needs three pulls up from 9 to 12 o'clock position with choke out, next pull ignition on as soon as engine fires start to unchoke the engine. If engine is warm one pull with ignition off and next pull with ignition on. Eight or twelve cylinder the same except maybe six pulls over with the ignition off. It is not much different pulling a T-head Buick, a straight eight Buick a V12 or my Pontiac over top dead center. If the engine is not properly sorted then all bets are off. Most peopl
    2 points
  41. The Aqua Zephyr at Hendricks Stadium, Fort Bragg, North Carolina. The fruit trees are in bloom! Luckily, you can't see the fine layer of pollen all over the AZ. 😢🥵🤭
    2 points
  42. I have to say Model T fords are cheap and very reliable. Not expensive to fix with parts everywhere. Depot hacks for larger groups, touring cars for the smaller group or couple. Add Rocky Mountain brakes if needed. I see decent Ts going for $6-8000. Not hard to drive once the driver learns and the main draw is the people road in an original of the first mass produced automobile. They are good in mud and snow also. People probably think I’m crazy but we couldn’t kill ours, couldn’t even come close. It was all original except for the aftermarket water pump.
    2 points
  43. Cars like that are almost never more reliable, particularly ones that are for sale. All old cars that are for sale need sorting. Sorting out a modified car that is a pile of parts that was never engineered as a package is rewarding, but is also more work. The overwhelming majority of people who build modified cars do not realize that and do not follow through. They get mad when it doesn't drive right after all the money they spent and sell it. Nobody told them that the first day the car ventures out of the garage is the beginning of the process, not the end. Its funny. I was away f
    2 points
  44. If anyone would butcher that car should be hung.
    2 points
  45. To our valued members: The AACA and its affiliates are monitoring issues related to the coronavirus (COVID-19) as well as abiding by the CDC and other governmental agency recommendations. Our members are our utmost concern and we will make notifications as necessary should our events or operations be affected in any way. AACA National Board of Directors
    2 points
  46. A excellent and useful post. There are many of us who have trod Greg's path and gained a lot of skills on the way.
    2 points
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