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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/14/2020 in all areas

  1. My Three Sons. They found time to work together. Now that's a rare find! (1972 Pontiac Ventura II) Fred MacMurray would be proud,
    8 points
  2. Placing seatbelts on a wooden coach built car is of no value, and probably a detriment. In a serious crash, the body will separate from the frame........attach the belts to the frame.......your dead in a very ugly manner. Attached to the wood.........you may or may not stay with the splinters and tin tossing down the street. Your better off with nothing and taking you chances of being thrown clear. Better yet......avoid all risks that you can, drive defensively, use your head. Much better and safer than belts in an old car.
    8 points
  3. See this this old photo of the Firetruck. 1930's I believe. I am extremely fortunate as I still get to drive it today. The frame was shortened, however it is still is on the road and takes part in many local vintage car events. Attached is a photo of my wife helping me get it ready for a parade last Nov. 2019. I believe it's stayed local here in Kamloops its entire life since it was new. Currently it is in the hands of the Kamloops Vintage Car Club. Which I am a member of. We own and take care of it (we baby it). We bring it out for everyone to see whenever we can. Several times a year.
    7 points
  4. I think the problem (and the largest threat to the continuing maintenance of old cars) is that collectors amass stashes of parts "just in case." Then they die. Their families not only have no idea what the parts are, but they don't even have a clue what to do with the stuff or where to turn to get rid of it. Then Mom sells the house and all that "junk" needs to go so they throw it in the dumpster in order to vacate the house. And then it's all gone forever. I see it happen over and over and over. I am guilty of gathering unneeded parts myself and while my wife is far more learned and experienc
    7 points
  5. This painting hangs in my local pub
    5 points
  6. There is a lot of engineering that goes in to safety systems to actually lower chance of injury. Belts installed in a car that wasn't designed for them is probably of limited benefit and potentially negative benefit.
    5 points
  7. I stopped by today and was able to see two coats of clear as it was applied to the body. The black looked very good and after the clearcoats it is really looking good. Now it will sit in the paint booth until Saturday. After that, the car comes out of the paint booth and the fenders, doors, etc, go in for paint. There is still a lot of work for him to do before the paint is finished, but it certainly looks different.
    5 points
  8. To all-too common definition of "hoarding" is when somebody else owns something that you want and they won't sell it to you.... A lot of people get the Scarlet H hung on them by people that don't know how they came upon the stuff in the first place. I could probably even be accused of it with some of the things I have that don't fit my collecting interests. What people don't know is some of it I literally picked out of a trash pile at the conclusion of a swap meet. Now, is that hoarding just because I put it away and haven't yet done anything with it or was that stuff given anot
    4 points
  9. Fenders are in polyester primer, and I blocked the hood as well. It already has a really nice layer of (fairly new) paint, so I am just running over it with a block to smooth it out. It's amazing how wavy it is, since it looked great before I touched it.
    4 points
  10. pkhammer is a good friend of mine, and you can trust your dealings with him. I'm trying to get to his place before all the goodies are gone!!
    3 points
  11. Nice stuff! The way you described things on the Main Forum I thought it was all Model A Ford stuff. Looks like Hershey 1975. Bob
    3 points
  12. ‘53 Chrysler over here. Body is bolted to frame. I installed 4 lap belts. Drilled thru body and used large washers on the back side. Rarely does the car go above 40mph. Probably 95% of my driving is in town on small roads. The lap belts, I gotta believe, offer some type of additional support. They might keep the steering wheel out of my teeth. My wife’s face out of the glove box. The back passengers don’t need their eyeballs inside the ashtray that is mounted in the back of the front seat. I can’t quite grasp why the seatbelts would not help me and my passengers. If the body comes
    3 points
  13. Keith, we have this picture. Wife will get a copy if you don't pay a ransome!! 😁
    3 points
  14. From John Mereness: “Basically, enjoy your car, make it better every time you touch - little stuff, and after you have driven it a while then make more major decisions.” It took me a long time to learn that. Too many friends bogged down on “projects” I am having a sign painter friend make one with that quote for my shop. Now back to our topic, well, sort of. I vote for deep maroon wheels and whitewalls on the Auburn. I always wanted to do that with my Model A Cabriolet but never did.
    3 points
  15. Larry musta been bored! He sent me a couple pictures of a very special fender and part of Norman’s story! I never in a million years thought this would come out. The day it was paid for in the junkyard in Owosso in the early 50’s the fenders were nice and straight. They went back the next day to pick it up and found somebody had backed into it with a tractor moving it around and creased the rear passenger side fender bad. Norm wasn’t at all happy with the damage but loaded it on the trailer and drug it home anyway. They happened to stop at a diner for lunch on the way home and just as they got
    3 points
  16. By looking at the differential's pictures I have, something was obvious: the ends of the diff at the wheels are separate parts assembled by welding to the main body. It's not important to know, but I still wonder if the machining was dome before or after welding. For my needs, I choose the solution "before" because the solution "after" is not suitable with my tools. Therefore, I machined 2 short tubes with the flange for the brake shield; this move will allow me to complete the rear brakes. The correct orientation of the brake shields on the main body will be easy then. The attached pictur
    3 points
  17. Feels like you hit the summit of mt. Rushmore doesn’t it!🕺💃🕺💃🕺💃 Makes you feel like dancing.
    3 points
  18. Tonight? Axles and diff out. Stole the bathroom scale out of curiosity. 57 lbs.
    3 points
  19. The parts were sold off and they are still available from another vendor. I forget the name. I've told this story before, but back in the 50s there was still a lot of ACD stuff mixed in with the Graham and Hupp parts. My dad got a ton of NOS Auburn/Cord/Duesenberg parts from there. We just used up our last NOS Duesenberg Master Cylinder that came out of there back in 1957. My dad bought 12 of them.
    3 points
  20. OK, I'll keep posting too...I love these old cars and often dream of earlier times before cell phones. LOL.
    3 points
  21. I don't like body work and should have done it first. I am making slow progress on a 31 Chevy Cabriolet with one more door to da and finish up the body work. Dave
    3 points
  22. No problem as long as it's car or garage related we are good.
    3 points
  23. We have recently purchased a large collection of antique auto parts from a now defunct auto museum. My intention is to save these parts and make them available to the collectors and restorers that need them. A small list of what we have so far: -Dozens of wood spoke wheels from the teens and twenties -Dozens of grille shells and grille parts fro the teens thru the forties -Trunks, heaters, radios, driving lights and other accessories -Dozens of carburetors, many NOS -Water pumps, starters, generators, magnetos, many NOS -Dozens of fender skirts, many N
    2 points
  24. Just tried to renew my lapsed membership on line. What an impossible thicket of dead ends, misleading instructions, and..... " You can't get there from here. You have to go someplace else first" (Spoken in my head with a thick down East Maine accent).......Oy Vey......... Bob
    2 points
  25. This New York Times Automotive supplement of Jan 04 1931 is on eBay currently. It shows an interesting array of cars available back then, interestingly, no Ford products shown?
    2 points
  26. ^^^^^^ Chrome goes well with everything. Bob
    2 points
  27. Klotz is the best stuff on the planet........smells good.......like the 1970's!
    2 points
  28. Just meant I miss the smell that was common in the 60's at races or are talks about vintage race cars verboten. In that case I won't mention the habit back in the day of LeMans starts of filling the float bowls of the carbs with nitro. One lap jump and gone to inspectors but made for an interesting smelling first lap. Or what the dime was for.
    2 points
  29. Dad says "That's one Ace Ventura!"
    2 points
  30. I got into buying collections like have been mentioned here about 10 years ago. I was looking for parts for a model A Ford and had an older friend that had a bunch of model A parts. When I went to him about what I needed he asked me "would you be interested in buying everything?". I have since bought numerous collections of parts, usually from families whose Father or Husband was a collector and had passed away and the family was just trying to deal with the "hoard". I have bought a diesel pickup and two enclosed trailers and me and a couple of good friends stay busy on the weekends. It's a lo
    2 points
  31. Joe said it was a Buick colors. It’s actually two tone but very subtle. I ask joe but I believe he said they were offered by Buick in 32’.
    2 points
  32. Hey Dave, Clearly there are two camps on this issue. I believe, with the early cars, that if one were in a high speed head on collision, chances of the driver being impaled on the steering column and the passenger exiting through the windshield are pretty high. However if the accident were at a lower speed and/or not head on (as is usually the case), there is a very high probability of one (or both) of the doors popping open on cars from the 1930's/40's. This is when people tend to fall out of the earlier cars and get seriously injured. The safety "double grip" door latche
    2 points
  33. Keith, thanks for the photos! to all others thank you as well for sharing all these great "of the era" photographs. It is really nice to know that there is a strong group of regulars here at this thread that are as enthusiastic as I am . ( I know several friends who are looking at this are also thinking - yes and as crazy too) Each image is telling a story, and in doing so is honoring those that had contact with the marvelous vehicles we see here. The common bond we have is wonderful, it also justifies and renews our passion - there are those who think "history is just the past" well i
    2 points
  34. Hi Gene - I no longer need one but Big Ricky apparently does .Thanks KReed ROA 14549
    2 points
  35. Al: have a look at fintube.com. They make a lot of different types of finned tube. For 5/8” tube, they seem to have options for 4 fins/inch ( or more) with up to 1/2” fin height (1-5/8” dia) - very close to what you want. As the fin diameter increases, the fin needs to be thicker to conduct the heat, so they offer 0.020” thick disks for 1-5/8” dia. Assuming your 2 cylinder engine is about 15 hp, at 746 W/hp, you need to get rid of about 11 kW of heat. With 5 rows high, 3 rows deep, 28” wide, you will have 1680 fin disks plus 420” of tube surface for heat exchange. It sounds like enough, but
    2 points
  36. Redundant maybe, but pertinent nonetheless. Forty years ago my 16yo nephew's friend surreptitiously, loaded a one car garage at a rental house that I own, with car parts. He informed me, after the fact of course that I wasn't going to be able to use the garage for a while, but it would be temporary. Thirty eight years later the parts were still there and the garage needed attention. The garage needed to be emptied, and the perpetrator was no where to be found. Most of the parts were not pre-war, but the process would have been the same regardless. I'm no longer young and my Sweetie has limited
    2 points
  37. Being in the Fire Service years ago, I remember one of our rescue trucks - 1972 Ford F250, I believe it had 6,000 original miles on it. It sold thru the Fire District by seal bid...beautiful truck, but people at times fail to realized the engine hours on those vehicles... like mention above by 3macboys, a lot of idle hours. After a run, all of our vehicles would go thru a check list... starting miles, ending miles and engine idle hours etc.. So if you see a retired emergency vehicle for sale, always take that into account. Steve Here is a picture of that Ford.... by th
    2 points
  38. The trouble is you have to buy parts when they are available, not when you want them.
    2 points
  39. there are hoards of parts owned by people who perhaps saw their father buy and hoard stuff ( it will be just so valuable some day - worth its weight in gold) perhaps for a car ( or cars) he had ( which never did see the road) and they are doing the same. One particular make of pre war car has at least two people who seek, buy and hoard.. One collection is known as being in 'the black hole in West Virginia". How many existing cars really need just a few parts to get them on the road and can not , due to the hoarders! Sad commentary on some peoples "right to own" what they do. Over the decades
    2 points
  40. I have noticed the lack of knowledge is a problem. I was a local swap meet, I was going thru a box of pre war headlight bulbs, the guy asked me if I knew what they were for, I said yes, he said great you can have them, you are the only person to look at them all day.
    2 points
  41. I served in an Engine Company for 25 years and you can call me "old school", but when my company and I were in the middle of a raging inferno, I want the sound of a Cummins or Detroit Diesel having my back.
    2 points
  42. Wow, I guess I turned this into the great pizza debate but Giordano's in Chicago is to die for! Uno's is still in business but Malnati's and Giordano's are two of the big guns in town. Pizza in Hershey? Might as well put ketchup on cardboard!
    2 points
  43. There is no "new direction". It was a clarification of the direction that the club has been in for its entire existence.
    2 points
  44. Folks, please!!!! Common sense WILL be the rule of the day! We just reaffirmed, tightened up the criteria. Our moderators hopefully will make sensible decisions and maintain the SPIRIT of what we are trying to accomplish with our forums. We will not always be perfect in our decisions but at least everyone now should be clear about what our forums are all about.
    2 points
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