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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/14/2020 in all areas

  1. I don't know if anybody here at AACA is interested in seeing a Bus, Camper, RV, Recently built out of a 1928 Chevrolet flatbed Truck..... Instead of using wood for the framework as they did back in the 1920's...... I used thin-wall tubular steel. I wanted it to be safe on the freeways, easy to get parts for, and be able to pull some weight, while traveling from Canada to the southwest..... I also really like the vintage body styles... with the sweeping fenders, big headlights... they are so Beautiful ...... This Bus was built outside in the desert of Arizona, during the Winter months... I have No Shop, and used a portable 5,500 watt Generator, and a wire-fed Mig welder....... I dismantled the original 1928 chevrolet truck body... sandblasted the sheet metal, spray painted it outside on a windless day after wetting down the ground, (to keep dust down).... I had to cut/splice/box and stretch, the original Frame.... fabricate engine and transmission mounts. I used a 1985 Chevrolet 4.3L Vortex V6 engine (fit nicely under that small hood, with plenty of power)...... 5 speed transmission....... 3/4 ton chevy rear end... I planed and created tongue & grooves on the white Oak boards and secured them to the steel framework with sheet metal screws...... I rebuilt all the wooden Hickory wheel spokes........ I created the cowl with scrap sheet metal, used two original, opening windshields, side by side.... and welded two visors to make one long one... mounted the original truck doors..... We (my wife & myself), made 20 oak framed, stained glass windows, and 4 arrow turn signal lens.... It had skylights, solar powered electricity, propane 4 burner stove with oven, 2 way (under the counter) Fridge, queen sized Bed and carried 50 gallons of potable running water to the Kitchen sink........ The driver, (ME)... sat on a bench seat up front of a woven willow divider wall. It took 3 months to build, cost $8,000 in total materials.... and we traveled 14,800 miles in it over a period of living in it for 3 years ....... I sold it for $45,000 to a man, retiring, who also lived and traveled in it, before selling it...... It now it lives in a Chevrolet museum in Florida .... I just want to inspire people to bring back to Life and enjoy using, these old vehicles.... and if you do most the work yourself.. you don't need to invest a large amount of money.
    7 points
  2. I welded up the emblem holes in the trunk lid due to it coming from a Skylark. I'll have to locate and drill new holes for the GS emblem before paint. I hosed the second round of super build on this afternoon. Hopefully only one or two more rounds of this.
    6 points
  3. Just realized, I have only posted my new car on Facebook but not here. Had bought this from Kentucky and picked it up on Friday in Rotterdam. Battery was dead, but with a fresh battery and a little gas in the carb it started immediately and ran smoothly. Amazing engine!!! Really happy about the car. Needs a lot of TLC, interior is mostly shot, but paint and chrome are good driver quality. Bumpers and grill are very good, window chrome, too. The chromed sweep speers are quite badly pitted, but lets see. No rust issues found so far underneath, but a little crusty. Overall a nice car to work on and improve and the engine runs so super smooth. Seats and door panels biggest issues for now. Right rear side window broken and vent window bad. Lights mostly work, besides dash lights and right rear blinker and brake light (bulb is good) and back up lights.... Lol, so maybe 50% of the lights are good. The lines of the car are just so beautiful!!!! Hans
    5 points
  4. What does one do on a Monday after supper when one doesn't feel like going out into a cold garage and getting dirty? Grab an old T shirt, some clean rags, some chrome cleaner and a bumper guard from the front bumper of a 1958 Buick Limited, tune in the local Classic Rock (yes that is the appropriate saying for 60-70's Rock) and polish away! Keeping in time with the songs is a great motivator. While not show quality it is a great driver condition piece. It's not perfect and wears the marks of a 57,000 mile vehicle can have depending on use and storage... I'm going for saving what I can to get it complete & back on the road.
    5 points
  5. They are two different cars from two different manufacturers. Is there any reason why you think they WOULD fit? Obviously, "fit" is a relative term. If your skillset included sheet metal work, hammer welding, TIG, etc, then sure, they will "fit".
    4 points
  6. 29 miles for breakfast today. Supposed to be another big snow storm this coming weekend so that will bring us back to Northeast US reality.
    4 points
  7. I don't know if anybody here at AACA is interested in seeing a Bus, Camper, RV, Recently built out of a 1928 Chevrolet flatbed Truck..... Instead of using wood for the framework as they did back in the 1920's...... I used thin-wall tubular steel. I wanted it to be safe on the freeways, easy to get parts for, and be able to pull some weight, while traveling from Canada to the southwest..... I also really like the vintage body styles... with the sweeping fenders, big headlights... they are so Beautiful ...... This Bus was built outside in the desert of Arizona, during the Winter months... I have No Shop, and used a portable 5,500 watt Generator, and a wire-fed Mig welder....... I dismantled the original 1928 chevrolet truck body... sandblasted the sheet metal, spray painted it outside on a windless day after wetting down the ground, (to keep dust down).... I had to cut/splice/box and stretch, the original Frame.... fabricate engine and transmission mounts. I used a 1985 Chevrolet 4.3L Vortex V6 engine (fit nicely under that small hood, with plenty of power)...... 5 speed transmission....... 3/4 ton chevy rear end... I planed and created tongue & grooves on the white Oak boards and secured them to the steel framework with sheet metal screws...... I rebuilt all the wooden Hickory wheel spokes........ I created the cowl with scrap sheet metal, used two original, opening windshields, side by side.... and welded two visors to make one long one... mounted the original truck doors..... We (my wife & myself), made 20 oak framed, stained glass windows, and 4 arrow turn signal lens.... It had skylights, solar powered electricity, propane 4 burner stove with oven, 2 way (under the counter) Fridge, queen sized Bed and carried 50 gallons of potable running water to the Kitchen sink........ The driver, (ME)... sat on a bench seat up front of a woven willow divider wall. It took 3 months to build, cost $8,000 in total materials.... and we traveled 14,800 miles in it over a period of living in it for 3 years ....... I sold it for $45,000 to a man, retiring, who also lived and traveled in it, before selling it...... It now it lives in a Chevrolet museum in Florida .... I just want to inspire people to bring back to Life and enjoy using, these old vehicles.... and if you do most the work yourself.. you don't need to invest a large amount of money. If you have a low income, don't let that stop you from buying an old vehicle, and as the parts are found at a reasonable price, you can bring it back to life... they are built so simple, they are not hard to figure out.... no need to restore one to original running condition... you can find lots of low mileage engines and running gear parts, at the wrecking yards.... pre-computers, pre 1985...... this does not need to be a rich man's hobby....🙄 Now a true Restoration, back to original, show room condition... this is another story.....that is a Rich man's hobby......
    4 points
  8. This 1953 Chevrolet 150 two door sedan, was bought new by a friend of the family from Bayer Chevrolet in Long Island City in Queens NY. My father had always wanted the car and was promised first opportunity to purchase the car when the original owner decided she was going to sell it. There is ZERO rust/rot on the car and has just a little over 40,000 miles on it. My father took ownership of the car in the early 80's and I inherited the car 10 years ago. It was off the road for some time prior to my fathers passing. I installed 5 brand new bias ply tires, a new fuel tank and sender, new fuel lines, new brake lines (steel and rubber), master cylinder and wheel cylinders, as well as all brake hardware and shoes; radiator was boiled out, new water pump and hoses. carburetor was rebuilt as well as the fuel pump. It has been certified HPOF by both the AACA and VCCA. The interior is original and is in nice shape, still has the original dealer installed cover on the rear seat (I removed the cover off of the front seat it was torn and uncomfortable to sit on) The car has the cheap heater and a radio delete, as well as a three speed transmission. The car runs and drives great, my reason for selling it is that I need to start downsizing and I just don't use it. As you can see this car has all of the patina that can not be replicated. The chrome was redone by my father prior to any clubs acknowledging unrestored cars. I had to paint the rims and had them pin stripped prior to mounting the new tires. I will post more pictures of the bottom of the car later today. It is located in central Florida the price is firm at $9,000 more information please email me at johnmahchv@aol.com or PM me
    3 points
  9. I'd bet early on people wanted a piece of the car, and a license plate would be the easiest thing to remove....really looks home made to me, not a production item.....
    3 points
  10. I doubt that! Newspapers would want operating economy, and back then, a business coupe or a 'utility sedan' with no rear seat would have been their prime choice for a news reporter to drive, with lots of room in the back for their camera gear. Plymouth or Dodge, Fords, Chevrolets, Studebaker Champions, or other inexpensive two-door offerings is what was commonly seen driven by news reporters. Craig
    3 points
  11. 36 Special, I too prefer them as originally manufactured. I hate to tell you but I think that one is going to take quite a bit of work to restore to original. From the steering column and what I think I see of the pedals, I suspect the body may have been placed on a different later chassis. It should have come with a Straight 8 engine. I know much more about 1937 and 1938 Buicks than I do 1936, but if a 1938 248 Straight 8 out of a 1938 Buick Special will work for you, I have most of a rebuildable 1938 248 Straight 8 here that you can have for free. I am not too far down the road from you in Wilmington. I would also suggest that Dave Tachney is the best source for parts for any 1936-1941 Buicks. You can best reach him at 763-427-3460 between 4 and 7 pm Central. I would also suggest you consider joining the 36-38 Buick Club. You can find out more about the club at: http://www.3638buickclub.org/. If you are interested in a .pdf copy of a recent 36-38 Buick Club newsletter, you can contact me through the contact the webmaster link on the 36-38 Buick Club website, or send me a PM on this site with you email address, and I will email you a copy of the newsletter.
    3 points
  12. Today I went to pay for and pick up my engine. Ouch. But it’s done and paid for. I’ve been painting bolt-ons and getting everything ready to put this thing in. Today I worked more on getting the master cylinder out, I’ll finish that tomorrow. The engine is now painted and everything is masked off waiting to receive plugs, manifolds, carb, etc. The engine shop lost one of my flywheel bolts so they have one hostage while they make one. Tomorrow after I get that, the engine and trans go together and in (after a fluid fill up).
    3 points
  13. Today I stopped by and got an update on the metal repair and paint. I took a few photos but there is a lot more work that has been done that probably does not really show up in the photos. Previously, I had chipped off all of the loose rubber from the running boards. I have been working on one of them. My plan is to replace all of the removed old rubber with bondo, to bring the contour of the board up to where it was originally. I will later apply a small coating of rubber over the existing rubber and the bondo patched areas. I am nearly finished with the patching of one running board. I still have a small amount of additional bondo to apply and a bit more shaping with files and a sander, but figured I would add a photo to show the work in progress. As soon as I find the time to finish patching this running board, I will move to the second running board. When I am finished with the patching of both running boards, I will attempt to cover them both with rubber.
    3 points
  14. Man, what a nice car for the money, that's going to be a great car for someone to have a lot of fun with.....thanks for posting here, hope it finds a good home quickly...
    3 points
  15. After 3 years of constantly asking my father-in-law what he was going to do with the 36 Buick Special he had sitting in the driveway of his backyard, he finally decided to give it to me!!! Attaching some photos! Going to be a full restoration to, or as close to factory as possibly. No street roddin', chopping or "suping" it up. I am old school and believe classics deserve to be restored to classic condition. Not that I am against what anyone else does with their cars, this is strictly my choice.
    2 points
  16. I just spent a little over a week in mainland China. I had a few days in Chengdu and went to the Sanhe classic car museum. There are no old cars to speak of in China. I was hoping to see a few obscure Russian or Chinese cars. This is a city of almost 8 million people. The owner of the museum owns several automotive dealerships. There were only 2 Chinese vehicles in the entire collection. 2 Chinese vehicles for dignitaries. Very behind in the styling for 1965 and 1974. The 1974 model is pictured. I assume the museum owner bought what he liked from the US or abroad, as he had some very rare and expensive cars. Numerous Rolls Royce’s. He did have a 1919 Buick H45. All of the bodywork on these cars was top notch. Posting a few other cars here just because of the sheer rarity. Hugh
    2 points
  17. There is an hour long show on the 2019 Amelia Island Concours coming up soon. It will include some info from past shows and some info on this year's silver anniversary. If you have never been to Amelia here is a chance to get SOME of the experience. If you were at the show a chance to relive it again. Amelia is a terrific event that combines the best of the production car world with race cars. The seminars are the best ever! NBC Sports Network (NBCSN) Tuesday, January 28, 2020 at 9 PM EST, replay at midnight EST
    2 points
  18. Thanks guys. I appreciate your comments. Now I realise I should have jotted down various ideas for pulling or pushing the bushes into the pistons before I blindly went ahead and used the first method I thought of. I used the treaded rod idea because I had used that method in the past on bushes and it had worked. Lesson learned! Al, I wish it would, I'm fed up with all this rain and windy weather that you lot on the other side of the pond are sending us! Thank you Roger. After reading your post I used the original Ford gudgeon pin to push the bush in straight and it worked. Mike, I used a slightly smaller bush and pushed it in (see my reply to Roger above). I may well do this with the other pistons. A heat gun maybe enough to expand the gudgeon pin bore enough? The problem is we don't have a freezer anymore since it packed up and our fridge does not have a freezer compartment. The fridge may at least get the bush reasonably cool. By using a slightly smaller diameter bush (0.0005" smaller) and using the original Ford gudgeon pin to push the bush in, it fitted OK. Now, to design a method of pushing, pulling or both pushing and pulling to fit this second bush in. I'll make a spigot on this 'lump' of metal bar the internal diameter of the bronze bush. I am now getting used to using the dial gauge to get the machining lengths correct. This spigot is going to be 3/4" long. I got close on the correct diameter with the machining. The final sizing I did with emery cloth to get a nice sliding fit. It nearly fits. It does now! You will have to wait until tomorrow so see what I do next.
    2 points
  19. Reminds me of the time a "Little Person", running a scam as a Fortune Teller, escaped Police Custody- The radio broadcast was: "Small Medium At Large" Nice Buicks, Matt- Variety is the Spice of Life
    2 points
  20. Thanks for your replies folks. The tranny came out as it had excessive counter shaft thrust washer wear. Symptoms were howling in 1st and 2nd gear. I rebuilt the tranny. The throwout bearing was also worn and is being replaced. From my perspective I am of the mindset that this is a hobby. I am reviewing an old tired mostly stock condition car. It will be a summer cruiser once in a while. Currently I am going over all the mechanical parts of the car. Making it safe and reliable. I enjoy wrenching on it as much as driving it. The clutch disc will be replaced. The pressure plate, maybe at another time. The car might see 300 miles in a year. Maybe. The tranny came out easily in about an hour. I am not concerned about removing it again in the the future if i need to get back into the clutch. I’m wrenching and trying to watch my costs. As you know it’s easy to throw $20K into a 4dr sedan. I’m trying to build a fun driver, rarely seen on the roads today. Without tossing to much money into the wind.
    2 points
  21. Gary, Thanks for the kind words. I know this will be a large undertaking. I am up for the challenge though as this to me is a piece of history also that needs to be restored. I've been told that the chassis is not the original. I've found a place that I can get a new one for this make, model and year though. The stuff is out there, just going to need to try and find it!
    2 points
  22. I have this aluminum version. Im not sure who made it, yet it says Made in Mexico in Spanish on it. It would look awesome on a 425 GS with the aluminum valve covers, as Ed mentioned.
    2 points
  23. I almost bought the aluminum batwing, but wasn't sure it would fit under the hood. It's my understanding a regular batwing doesn't fit without serious base mods. I went with a Cal Custom "Shaker Scoop" for mine. With a 2" tall 10" diameter air filter, it clears the hood by almost a inch. The filter is undersized by a couple cubic inches for the engine size, but I prefer the looks than full on performance. Inbeween the fins is going to be painted teal to match the motor. Matching valve covers eventually.
    2 points
  24. Dissembled and Scrubbed the abs unit. Tomorrow, I’m going to thrown new lines and bolt this guy in.
    2 points
  25. Iancemb -- guess you're right. But I don't recall having ever encountered such unpleasantness here before.
    2 points
  26. Just for comparison, here is what one of the original Indy car seating areas looks like. Seat belts are, of course, a modern addition.
    2 points
  27. Sometimes owners want cars restored properly, the Rene Thomas Ballot was brush painted the day before the 1919 INDY 500. It looked great on the lawn at Pebble Beach 2019. Bob
    2 points
  28. Hi Alex I can help you with most of these below: Please see my comments in bold. Under the hood, the bar towards the front which holds the insulation in place - x1 Sunvisors - left and right Fuel door - in excellent condition, no pitting! Accessory button for dash with something holding it in place - don’t need the actual button (Please Clarify) Windshield trim clips Trim that goes across roof on the inside - x2 Headline trim pieces that sits along and above the window - 2 each side - passenger and driver Glove compartment contact/jamb for the light Driver side door lock mechanism - mainly the rods that connect to the door handle Rear middle window - clear glass - Century/Special only Washer jar pump - I have the lid 2 Door handles - 2dr HT 2 front seat trim - black or white - manual seats 1 Cigarette lighter - complete The top plastic ‘lid’ for the horn ring. I have the plastic that has the text, need the dome over it. 1 screw for inner tail light bezel. There are usually 3 in total on each side but I’m missing 1. 1 centre ventilation bracket, the one that sits below the dash and holds it up the on the passenger side. 2 Window channel - front door. (I don't think these are from the two door hardtop, the two door hardtops and convertibles used the chrome ones as you list below) 2 chromed door side window frames - bottom section (These are going to be very difficult, but we can discuss. I just did the ones on my convertible.) Washer jar holder bracket I will pull the pieces and send you some pictures. Steve
    2 points
  29. I don’t really care, except for verifying it was a real sale. I’m tired of fake auction sales and the resultant hype that goes on with the media. I heard a rumor it was a questionable sale, and just trying to get facts. The auction company could have very well guaranteed the family a certain sales number, and now they own it. Would like to think I’m wrong, but with high dollar egos, having no one coming forward and bragging makes me wonder. Isn’t this Mustang all about bragging rights?
    2 points
  30. Don't make more work out of this if you can help it. Do a bubble flair at the break and put a short piece in from the break back to the Teves Master Cylinder Practice on the broken piece so you can get some experience.
    2 points
  31. If Ben's 92 counts, do I get to count the 7,689 miles that I put on Large Marge last year? She rolled over the150K mark this past year and she still runs like a Swiss watch.
    2 points
  32. The CCCA lists cars that they consider "Classic," which is the same term as "Full Classic." As noted, they were expensive cars of limited production, mostly before World War II. However, they don't own the word! The word "classic," with a lower-case letter, is widely used by everyone else to describe old cars that people enjoy. There is no list for that--it's what you make it to be! As Steve Moskowitz intimated above, the AACA is the club for collectible cars of all sorts. Vehicles 25 years old, or older, are eligible to participate in their events. If you join the national organization, you can also join a "region" near you that will enable you to know other local car fans, and participate in many fun local activities. Being active in AACA can really enhance your enjoyment of your old car.
    2 points
  33. I decided to drill the holes I need using the dividing head rather than the rotary table. The dividing head is more accurate and it is much easier to fit on the drill press table. Because it is so accurate, I took a chance and did the pieces one at a time. The front plate was drilled and tapped. Then the rear plate was drilled with clearance holes. I then put both pieces on the expanding arbor and tried screws in the holes. They all aligned perfectly. With that done, I took the rear plate off and used a counterbore to get a perfectly flat surface around the screw hole. Nuts will go here. I was thinking of using acorn nuts but that would require that the little rods that go between the two plates be very precise. I still haven't made up my mind on this part. With the two plates screwed together and on the arbor I turned them down to slightly larger than the flat made by the counterbore. The plates are slightly larger than the old ones. I was never happy with the way they looked as the heads of the cap screws were right on the edge and I'd prefer not to use socket head cap screws for this. The last thing I did today was set the inlet plate up in the mill to cut the water inlet channel. In it's finished form it is 1-1/2" deep. It's only 1/4" here - so I have something to start on first ting in the morning. Thus far the cast aluminum is milling much smoother than the 6061 I used previously.
    2 points
  34. THat s a piece of cake. If the car is anywhere near Montreal it will even be easier. I have shipped motorcycles out of Montreal to Europe several times and one crated 4 wheel dirt tracker to Melbourne Australia. The docks are right there at Lachine. a suburb of Montreal contact Bollore Logistics Canada
    2 points
  35. You should be able to get the lock cyl assembly out without a key, if its not froze-up. Look close at the shaft, there is a small pin to knock out, once removed, the lock assembly should pull out the front.
    2 points
  36. AACA would welcome you!! We have classes for your car
    2 points
  37. Probably the method to pull the bushing was not ideal: the piston is a cast part; the surface on which the special tool rested is not 100% perpendicular to the axle. I would imagine a device to guide the bushing using the free hole from the piston and the inside diameter from the bushing. With that, even if the tool is not perfectly perpendicular, the bushing will not be canted. If you can guide the bushing the right way into the piston, you will probably be able to save it as the shaving was not on the whole surface.
    2 points
  38. Hi everybody, I’m actually on my way back to home with the car and the spare engine/transmission in my trailer. It’s a 7 passenger and he’s so original. Nothing missing except 1 gauge. me and my wife don’t want to restore the car. We will clean it, make the mechanics work to tour with the car, new top, new tire and he will be ready for he’s new life. He’s sitting in a garage since the 60’s and never been started since the last owner bought the car. He have in project to restore the car but sadly he past away. me and my wife Alexandra are both 29 years old and are brass area enthousiast but we own 3 Buick McLaughlin because the company are Canadian and have a wonderful history. We live in batiscan, quebec (French parts of Quebec, sorry if my writing are not perfect I do my best) Our plan with antique is to have a collection of all running, original and unrestored or good old restoration car because they are in majority incontestably real when they are like that, not assembled from scratch. I’ll post more picture of all around the car And interior Monday morning. if somebody know good knowleadgeable guys about McLaughlin I’m interested to have is information. many thanks anthony
    2 points
  39. For those friends of Joe's that could not be there, I've posted a few photo's (provided by Dan Bower) from Joe's funeral service. The service was well attended by friends and family, with many of Joe's favorite Buicks in the procession. Lots of good "Joe" stories told by family and friends. One display that stood out was a map of the U.S. with pins showing where Joe (along with friends and family) had traveled over the years in his Buicks. I don't think that feat could be matched by anyone else. Joe always said that "Buicks were meant to be driven", and he meant what he said. Joe led a full and interesting life, and will be missed by many.
    2 points
  40. Nice catch of me and my wife Alexandra Barn find, Buick McLaughlin K-49 1920 7 passengers, 6 cylinders, 60hp. Never out of the garage since the 60’s and last time running 1944 Very original, with spare engine and transmission. Project: leave it as it is. Except mecanical refresh, 5 tires and new top. Anybody know McLaughlin car please contact me I’ll have some question for my project. thank you everybody to share your passion anthony and Alexandra
    1 point
  41. The following two trucks were owned by the dealership I eventually owned. Sadly, they were long gone. The 34 olds pick up was built by the guys in our body shop as a parts hauler. The other truck I believe is a 28 Chevrolet
    1 point
  42. The car was stolen in Topeka Kansas, so it should be a Kansas plate. I doubt criminals changed plates on stolen cars back then.....
    1 point
  43. It depends on which 8 cylinder engine you have. Presidents with the 337 cu in engine used generator 927J from 1931-33. The armature, but not the generator itself, was shared with Pierce Arrows of the period. Dictators and Commanders with the smaller 8 used generator 955C from 1929 through 1934. The Chilton Interchange book says 1930-ish Marmons used the same armature - good luck with that!
    1 point
  44. I think the mystery piece is the wire harness cover on the driver side inner fender behind the battery.
    1 point
  45. I'd rather have the flying steam engine.
    1 point
  46. Wouldn't want that car. I don't think I could handle my mom having a crush on me.
    1 point
  47. Yes, old neoprene (Buna-N) o-rings leak oil. replace with Viton and you are good to go for years!👍 You only top off with Lucas? You need oil too! Yes, you should be asking Corvair questions over on : http://corvaircenter.com/phorum/list.php?1 Manual transmission or PG (Powerglide)? Flywheels get lose rivets and mimic a rod knock perfectly! Spark knock only happens on acceleration. Sounds like BBs rattling around in there. Do not worry about a valve adjustment until you get 1000 miles or so on it and you will do a valve adjustment when you replace the o-rings anyway.😉
    1 point
  48. The Crawford Auto-Aviation Museum in Cleveland, Ohio has an original 1914 Stutz roadster. They got it back in the 1960's in rough shape and restored it. While it's true many 1916 & earlier roadsters and Bulldogs were made into Bearcats, this is one example that was not.
    1 point
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