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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/13/2020 in all areas

  1. Nice catch of me and my wife Alexandra Barn find, Buick McLaughlin K-49 1920 7 passengers, 6 cylinders, 60hp. Never out of the garage since the 60’s and last time running 1944 Very original, with spare engine and transmission. Project: leave it as it is. Except mecanical refresh, 5 tires and new top. Anybody know McLaughlin car please contact me I’ll have some question for my project. thank you everybody to share your passion anthony and Alexandra
    9 points
  2. FINALLY!!! I got some time and nice weather to work on the Old Merc. Was a great day to get some car therapy in. The temps have been starting out in the low 30's , but warms up nice during the day. I think the folks back east are having better weather than we are lately. I managed to get the bad rust holes cut out and new metal strips put in and had to put a filler strip where the lead fell out at the end of the quarter. Looks like I got all the little pin holes welded up on the trim line also. I'm going to invest in one of those shrinking discs and see if I can get the waves out of the
    6 points
  3. After 3 years of constantly asking my father-in-law what he was going to do with the 36 Buick Special he had sitting in the driveway of his backyard, he finally decided to give it to me!!! Attaching some photos! Going to be a full restoration to, or as close to factory as possibly. No street roddin', chopping or "suping" it up. I am old school and believe classics deserve to be restored to classic condition. Not that I am against what anyone else does with their cars, this is strictly my choice.
    4 points
  4. During our short vacation in France, I took the raw material which will be the pattern to shape the frame and I began to work on it. It's 5mm thick, therefore, I cannot prepare it at home, I have no suitable vise. That piece of brass is 420 mm long or 16.6" Back home, I'm continuing the brake shields by adding the various element to make the brakes operable.
    4 points
  5. Last post - period picture of 1918 Kissel Sedanlette from sales materials and finished picture of restored 1918 a Sedanlette.’ the end! Ron Hausmann P. E.
    4 points
  6. I did the most difficult part today, milling the slots that the center of the pump fits into. The last time I milled them first and then turned the center to fit the slots. That is much easier than doing it the other way around but I don't want to make the center over so I gave this a try. I put one end of the previous pump in the mill and lined the 3/16 end mill up with the slot. That is one of those things that is much easier said than done when a being few thousandths off can spell disaster. Naturally, I though of a better way of doing it after I'd already started.
    4 points
  7. Go to classiccarclub.org/grand_classics/approved_classics_2019.html . Definitely no Fords. Only prewar and a few '40's postwar Lincolns. Mass produced assembly line cars just don't fit the definition of a "classic" car. The term has to be one of the most misused words in the car hobby. The Classic Car Club website defines what attributes are required for classic car status. Jim
    3 points
  8. No seal beams in 1937 , yours would be more period correct than a sealed beam.
    3 points
  9. My best guess would be a 1927 Essex.
    3 points
  10. 3 points
  11. 60 degree plus weather this past weekend. Stretched the 54 and 60 for a few miles.
    3 points
  12. " On 1/9/2020 at 7:03 PM, Matt Harwood said: I have decided that I need to own a Full Classic tow truck. Very much want something like these. Maybe I'll cut the back off my '29 sedan... " Not a Classic, but I always wanted a tow truck so I made my own. At least the wrecker boom is at least 80 years old.
    3 points
  13. Well, hopefully I am not off topic. I do own a couple of 32 v-16s. I have driven one of them on a number of Classic Car Carvans one of at least 4,000 miles. The 32 is a very different car from the 30/31's which are much more truck like in driving and riding. The 32's and 33's are a pleasure to drive, even long distances or at prolonged freeway speeds. I don't have personal experience with the later cars. A lot of the v-16 engine parts interchange for multiple years. Because the v-8's and v-12's often used the exact same bodies many other parts are also available for these
    3 points
  14. Mr. Earl goes to the hospital and has a memory lapse as to where he is.
    3 points
  15. here's a recent picture of my 1928 Lincoln tow truck that was converted back in the day taking off the back portion of the limo body and retaining the front of the body. Its a great runner.
    3 points
  16. Hey All, My name is Scott and I reside in Central NC just outside of the Raleigh area. Newbie to the site but a long time Buick guy. My first was a 1970 Buick Gran Sport when I was 17. Unfortunately as a young and dumb kid back in the day, I met a woman in my late teens and sold the car! I still tear up when I think of that car and the amount of time, love and money I put into that car only to sell it right before the paint job. Recently, my father-in-law caved in after 3 years of me constantly asking him what he was going to do with his 36 Buick Special he had sittin
    2 points
  17. Because it looks like the Millennium Falcon...Kinda.
    2 points
  18. Wanted to give an update on this. First off, I want to say thanks to Cabelaro2, 1957Buickjim and g-g-g0 for helping me out on this. The turn signals are in working order!! Yahoo!! Thank you guys!!
    2 points
  19. Man, what a nice car for the money, that's going to be a great car for someone to have a lot of fun with.....thanks for posting here, hope it finds a good home quickly...
    2 points
  20. Look what I found when crawling around under the car.. so i guess when you put new heavy duty leafsprings and airbags in, and then add the weight of a trailer plus all the stuff for the trip.... you might want to upgrade from the rubber shackle bushings to heavy duty polyurethane ones... the rubber just can't take the be punch. Hopefully the ones the local parts store are getting for me will fit without much modification. Good thing I noticed now and not a 1000 miles down the road..
    2 points
  21. Here is a roller/brush painted truck that I built and painted last year... I used Rustolium enamel.... which is self leveling...... and the second and third coats need to go on when wet.. about 5 minutes after the previous coat.... it was done out side in the sun.....
    2 points
  22. Yes it cam from the man that uses the Handle; PovertyCove...... from the coast of Maine .... very nice car, runs like a swiss watch..... and can you believe he let it go for $5K.... the market is down enough for some of use 'Lower income guys", to be able to Enjoy these Pre-war machines.... a photo of the back....
    2 points
  23. As I said earlier, the guys rebuilding this engine are two of the best in the hobby. So I think I'll wait for a replacement crankcase. I would like to thank everyone for their responses as this has been most interesting to me. Steve
    2 points
  24. Satisfied with having the front tires on I looked up on the shelf and noticed a hood trim I think is for the Limited. Having sat on the shelf for so long I thought I'd better get out the magic stuff and have at her. Good thing I did as it took quite a bit of scrubbing to get a few stubborn spots off. While not perfect it will do for a driver and against the black paint some might not even notice. Fortunately I put all the bolts in so I don't have to go searching those out. Not going to be another late night tonight...
    2 points
  25. Nice job you'll love it when it is done, I like the bold interior a lot.
    2 points
  26. Another picture of a Standard 8 touring car.
    2 points
  27. It was over 70° today! (for reference its usually in the 30s this time of year) Couldn't pass that up, so unwrapped the Riv and let the girlfriend take some beauty shots. She's a way better photographer than I am.
    2 points
  28. Interesting guy - had a master's degree, was a Korea veteran, and started Bonanza and Ponderosa steak houses. Dunno if the story is true, but I read that the Bonanza crew had a beat-up old fridge where they kept soda and snacks. Blocker routinely helped himself until he found out the crew, not the producers, were paying for the goodies and no one had the courage to tell the star to chip in. The next morning, a brand new top-of-the-line refrigerator had appeared and Blocker kept it stocked thereafter.
    2 points
  29. Still not sure what I am quite going to do for the outer part of the tool for pulling in the bronze bushes into the piston, I have sketched out some ideas, but it seems that I am now making it up as I go along! I started off with this bit of stainless hexagon scrap and drilled it out to a clearance hole for the threaded studding, that I am going to use to pull the bush into the gudgeon pin hole in the piston. I then counter bored it to a depth of a 1/4" and then bored it out to an internal clearance bore of the diameter of the bronze bush.
    2 points
  30. The National Motor Museum in Birdwood South Australia has a Packard "wrecker" in attendance.
    2 points
  31. http://www.aaca.org/images/2020_AACA_Annual_Convention_seminars.pdf please disregard my idiot answer above then...Stacy has had it out for a few days and there was not only an email blast but it is on our home page. See you in Philly and congrats on your award.
    1 point
  32. I decided to drill the holes I need using the dividing head rather than the rotary table. The dividing head is more accurate and it is much easier to fit on the drill press table. Because it is so accurate, I took a chance and did the pieces one at a time. The front plate was drilled and tapped. Then the rear plate was drilled with clearance holes. I then put both pieces on the expanding arbor and tried screws in the holes. They all aligned perfectly. With that done, I took the rear plate off and used a counterbore to g
    1 point
  33. My engine is not overheating (according to the temp gauge) but if you fill the radiator up to 1" from the cap opening, the radiator will spit a lot of it back out after it comes up to operating temperature. The coolant level would then be about 6" below the cap opening but the engine would not appear to be overheating at all. I could continue to run with the coolant at this 6" low level but I'd rather try to keep the radiator as full as possible. I am tired of cleaning up the mess it makes every time this happens. I would not have added this NOS overflow tank if this didn't keep
    1 point
  34. Just read the link posted above by Ben P re Rex tops and enclose some photos of the original Jiffy rain curtains which came with my super original 1918 Paige 6-39 Linwood 5 seat tourer. It also came with a fitted hood blanket and radiator blanket which unfortunately seems to have shrunk and is difficult to fit without damaging it.
    1 point
  35. Little late in seeing this post. We had a 1903 Cleveland Rear Entrance Tonneau shown for many years in AACA. It was owned by Roger Weiss of Yorkville, Illinois. I used to show my Curved Dash Olds next to him at many shows. I believe I heard a few years ago that Roger passed away. In any event, I am not sure where the car is today but there is a fully restored example somewhere.
    1 point
  36. Chris, You need to test fuel pressure while doing your tests. Get a Fuel pressure gauge or borrow one from Auto Parts Store. You need to be in the 40+psi range for proper engine performance. Without gauge you will not be able to tell if there is any pressure differences with any of the tests. If key on looks good with gauge then I see no need to do the other tests. Check the Fuel Regulator, If you have gas is coming out the vacuum line, regulator is bad, and this could be part of your issue.
    1 point
  37. It could be a valiant in 63. Maybe a 330 wagon ?
    1 point
  38. And if anyone has any questions I am the owner of the car.
    1 point
  39. It will be this 1953 Chieftain Deluxe 8 that I drive frequently in nice weather. Starting January mileage 84053. Thanks and I'd like to see more people get in on this!
    1 point
  40. Nan Ness Auto Row (pictures) https://ohp.parks.ca.gov/pages/1054/files/van ness auto row.pdf
    1 point
  41. Signed up for the local Tech School wood working classes have you Lamar?
    1 point
  42. Start here---------> https://www.craftmasterpaints.co.uk/ They still make a line of cellulose paint that is designed to be applied by brush. Craig
    1 point
  43. I think most gasoline GM engines from about 1980 on have knock sensors and if the sensor hears detonation, the computer will retard the timing so the knock goes away. I also agree with the other comments that unless you are hammering the gas pedal, it is not necessary to use premium gas especially on cars with knock sensors. Timing is automatically retarded when knocking is detected.
    1 point
  44. I myself DON'T use them. Really don't see there is a reason. The other reason is IF you or someone taps the bumper on the protruding tip not only does the bumper flex/twist it also takes with it the fender which gets bent out of shape. Just my thoughts.
    1 point
  45. OldMan, I had leaks in my trunk only to find the painter or owner never put on tail light frame mounts and the lense gasket after the car was painted. Just a thought. Turbinator
    1 point
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