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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/16/2019 in all areas

  1. My friend just picked up this driver from Kentucky with a vintage PA front plate.
    6 points
  2. This past weekend I started my 1929 Studebaker President up and let it run until warmed up which right now is all I can do. I had not done the winter oil change and wanted to get that taken care of. I was stopped by my wife and adult daughter because I am suffering from a medical issue that I hope will be solved by an upcoming brain surgery procedure. My daughter said to me โ€œLet me change the oil, after all I need to learn how to do it if I am going to take care of the Studebaker.โ€ She crawled under the Studebaker while I sat nearby telling her what to do to complete the oil change. This got me thinking about all of the things I know that I havenโ€™t passed on to my daughter who will someday be the next caretaker of my Studebaker. I am left wondering how to pass on everything I know about maintenance and driving of a car that I have taken 50 years to learn. I guess I should not have waited so long to get started. Now I wonder how do I make up for lost time? Earlier this past April, before my medical issues got in the way, I started to teach her to drive the Studebaker. The lesson was not real successful because she has never driven a manual transmission before. However, she got the basics. Here is a picture of her smiling behind the wheel after her first drive in the Studebaker.
    5 points
  3. Beautiful Studebaker, take her on a weekend tour, would not have to be that far. Just a nice ride and a great overnight destination. The best way to learn is jump in with both feet, she will have you to help her learn. I always forget all the details, having her do the driving she will have lots of question. My daughter driving my 1933 Graham
    5 points
  4. Lapping the discs to each other did improve the situation but not enough so I decided to open up the holes in the front disc. The idea here is that the sides of the cap screw will not touch the inside of the hole which, given there is probably a small amount of miss-alignment, could cause some binding. I'm using a 9/32 reamer so I'm enlarging the holes by 1/32 of an inch. It will eventually get conventional hex head bolts here. That made a substantial improvement. There is still a tiny amount of friction when you turn it but it is so small an amount I suspect a little oil will solve it. With that done, I broached key ways opposite the set screws. I also lapped the surfaces a little to get them even flatter. This about finished this part of the job. There are some cosmetic things to be done to the caps but I'll leave those for a day when I'm waiting for materials. I took the pillow block off the engine and put the magneto on it's shelf to see if it aligned - which, I knew it would. Next up is the cam shaft bearing. I will probably have to order a few things in for that but this time I decided not to start buying materials ahead of time since often enough I change my mind about how to do things and they sit around waiting for a purpose. I've also decided that I really don't like the welding on the water pump - it simply doesn't look right for the period โ€“ and have come up with an elegant solution - something I should have thought of long ago.
    5 points
  5. Bought this whole collection today, nice Christmas present to myself! These Hallmark' collectibles date back as far as 1991 (so they achieve our "25 year" minimum). Left to right are Santa's 4x4 of 1996 (Jeep), Antique Car, 1991, Haul-idays 1993, 1956 T-Bird 1993, Jazzy Jalopy 1999 (battery operated), Kringle Tours 1992, and Shopping with Santa 1993. These were selling on kijiji locally, all are in original packaging, most never opened. Paid $68Can for the lot (about US$45). Any old car nuts with Christmas spirit should check out their local vendors. Happy Christmas Shopping.
    4 points
  6. I did the "rescue" thing and hauled home the remains of a 1935 Morris Eight 4dr. It's the same car as the one I've already got in the garage, only this one is a real basket case. It's been passed around for several years, and ended up on a farm north of Richmond. It was spread out all over the place, fortunately most of it was sheltered. I'm guessing it's about 60-70% complete with too much missing to restore - so, it becomes a spare parts stash in case I ever need anything for my car. Got a spare engine (not the right year for the car, but close), trans, rear end, front and rear axles, steering stuff, sheet metal (doors, fenders, etc) and several boxes of odds and ends, indiscriminately stripped, disassembled and tossed into boxes with no organization of any kind. It would be a real jig-saw puzzle for someone who doesn't know what's right for the car! I'll have fun over the next month or so sorting, cleaning, labeling, and packing away. One reason I decided to haul this home was because the cars are not seen often. I've become aware of only about a dozen or so. Anyone else got one? I've included a photo of mine parked next to Susan's 1948 MGTC. They are related, and it's interesting to see the pre-war and post-war comparison. Terry
    4 points
  7. It's too bad that the article can't be read without creating an account. Free or not, if it involves a password and registration of my email address, it's just not worth it to me. Christmas Cheers, Grog
    4 points
  8. Thought I'd post an update to my seat adjuster issue. I found some acme rod and a brass block on ebay and modified them to resemble the original screw. Used some pretty crude tools (grinding wheel and hand drill) to 'machine' the parts. Finished the assembly tonight, and I'll install it later this week. Spent about 12 bucks in parts. The sheet steel brackets came from a parts car, so I didn't disassemble the original part. Seems to work well, although it's a single thread, not a double as the original was, so it'll take a few more turns to move the seat.
    4 points
  9. Today I continued welding up pinholes and cleaning more up on the fender. Still more grinding to do to finish the metalwork. I completed the windshield and frame (Photo 1). Overall, it turned out okay. It was a lot of work. In the future, I'll have to make a few corrections. Due to some corrosion and fitment issues, I ended up stripping a few threads on the screws that hold the windshield posts on and I had some problems with the original backing plate that everything screws into. I had to use 2 screws that don't quite look right and one of those is zinc and not chrome, as I had to switch from metric to standard, due to stripped threads. I don't think anyone will notice except me, but I'll have to try to make it better when I see the fastener guy at Carlisle next. I still need to clean it up and trim the excess glazing material. It was nice today, about 57 degrees, so broke out the Clogmaster and blasted the outer headlight buckets and hood hinges (Photos 2 & 3). Followed them up with some rust inhibitor on the buckets (they will end up being silver cadmium) and the hinges will go on in primer to be painted on the car, as original.
    4 points
  10. Matt is spot on. This doesn't just apply to electrification, either. No aftermarket conversion of anything (engine swap, trans swap, brake swap, etc) will have anywhere near the engineering and testing investment that the factory put into their cars originally. That is not to say that pure stock is the only way to go (and most of my cars are modified in one way or another), just don't kid yourself that any aftermarket or garage modification will be more reliable that properly maintained OEM. I don't know how many threads I read on various automotive forums (fora?) about people who have done four wheel disk brake "upgrades" and now the car doesn't stop as well as it did before, or how many people have converted points to electronic ignition because it's "more reliable" except now they have to carry a spare ignition module in the glove box so they won't be stuck when the original craps out.
    3 points
  11. I found this article in a google search. This is from "Motor Age" dated Dec 22, 1921. It heralds the new AC speedometer. Next is a photo of my test mule for the speedometer with a pointer made so I can work without the face plate on the speedometer. I am using my worst looking speed wheel at the moment. I did locate the decals for Chevrolet to 80 MPH (same AC unit as Buick for 1927). I also found a Stewart Warner wheel decal for 75 MPH, but not sure if this fit is correct for the AC speed wheel yet. I JB welded together an old speed wheel yoke and put it in the car. It is running about 13 MPH slow relative to the GPS. I noticed that the growth of the original repaired yoke does not allow the speed wheel to adjust lower than mid way in the adjustment slots and therefore does not drop deep into the spinning magnetic spider. The second attempt at a 3D printed speed wheel yoke arrived so I put that in the mule. Since it is mainly a copy it had similar dimensions to the repaired one. I had to grind the bottom legs to get it to drop lower on the adjustment scale. At 430 RPM I was reading 29 MPH at the top of the adjustment slot, and 34 MPH if I moved it to the bottom of the slot. According to the early cable readings, 460 RPM should be about 20 MPH. I also understand that not having the housing on the back (and maybe even the face plate on the front) will effect the magnetic field. I need to do more testing to find out. Hugh
    3 points
  12. When you deal with the steering box and then align the car properly matched to also needing new or good king pins and new or good spring bushings the car will handle beautifully. My advice though is one thing at a time and get some more hours on it before making any additional rebuilding decisions.
    3 points
  13. I'm still here! Babylife has been keeping me busy, but I have made some progress on the Buick in these past 4 months... ๐Ÿ˜‰ The engine and transmission have been mounted and the body, doors, and panels are ready for the mobile media blaster. I'm planning to have that done in January. After that's finished, everything will be primed and the floors will be cut out and replaced. Then, we'll paint the bottom and put the body back on the frame. ๐Ÿ™‚ I've also included a photo of my little helper, wearing his favorite onesie. ๐Ÿ˜›
    3 points
  14. I had the blaster out yesterday so we could get this done before a nasty winter storm rolls through today and tomorrow. There was am undercoating on the body that was like a hard plastic. Similar to truck bed liner. We were worried that it wouldn't come off with the blaster...but had high hopes. It actually blew off pretty quickly. I had him clean up the rolling chassis while he was here, as well as the underside of the trunk lid. I now have the chassis in the shop ready to disassemble. The body is in the house garage where it will stay until I finish the chassis. There is one ugly spot on the body floor that needs attention, and a couple really small spots where seams overlap. Other than that, it's really clean.
    3 points
  15. Mark just spend the time, she will pick up more than you can imagine. Also best wishes for a speedy recovery, nice to see you back on here.
    2 points
  16. I have never used lube on any part of the switch. If it were mine, I'd clean it out and leave it without grease. You really don't want anything getting stuck or clogged in this circuit.
    2 points
  17. FN motorcycle, that's what he's looking for, or parts......first four cylinder motorcycle made, in Europe...Pierce would copy this motorcycle to manufacture the first four in the United States, 1908-09
    2 points
  18. So I have been making a little progress with my test mule. I have a variable speed drill with the trigger held with a velcro strap. I have the drill on a foot pedal to make shutting it on and off easier. I have a spare speedometer cable. When it is on, I am turning 530 RPM. If the bucket is off the speedometer, it reads 34 MPH. Once I put the bucket on, the most I can get out of the speedometer is 19 MPH and with the speed wheel as low into the armature as I can set it. I grabbed another backing (I have 5). I put the speed wheel in it, and not all the way down, put it in the bucket, and it reads 30 MPH. It should read 30 MPH at 504 RPM per the 1921 posting as William pointed out. That is pretty close and I did not do a lot of tweaking yet, just happy to be in the ball park for once. Don, Your point is well taken about the spring. The wheel is still returning to 0 when the drill is off, so it is close. So how do I check the power of my magnets? Obviously I have at least one that is low. Can I recharge them? How would I know the amount of charge to add.? Are there other good options. Can I just add magnets to what I have rather than putting them in different places as they did with Don's speedometer? This is so Pre War Buick. It's not just one part that is broken, but multiple parts as you dig into it. No wonder Buick chose AC as the supplier. More equal minds thinking alike.
    2 points
  19. Hugh: It is funny that your repaired yoke's sweet spot for operation produced the same results as what my repaired (JB weld) AC unit did. 13 MPH lower. All I used to check mine was the 25 MPH traffic sensor sign near my neighborhood. (Sign indicated speed of 28 MPH. The speedometer showed 15 MPH.) Again, the one that came in my car was spot on up to 30 mph when binding on the drum caused it to go crazy. That yoke had an old repair that was epoxied in place and was missing one leg. Another point to take into consideration is that the permanent horseshoe magnet may loose it's magnetic strength over the years. When I was restoring some early Briggs and Stratton engines and early 1920s horn type radio speakers the magnets for the ignition on the Briggs and the driver on the speakers had to be "recharged".
    2 points
  20. It seems ages since I have posted anything about how I am getting on with the Humberette, although I believe it is only a few days. The calculations below may not be of any use to non Humberette owners, although, they may be of use to Humberette owners looking for replacement pistons for their Humberette engines in the future. PISTON CALCULATIONS FOR HUMBERETTE ENGINE STANDARD ORIGINAL HUMBERETTE PISTON FORD ZETEC PISTON 24003 STD Measured Measured Measured Measured by Micrometer by Vernier Use for Calcs by Micrometer by Vernier Use for Calcs inches inches inches inches inches inches Standard bore diameter is 84.25 mm (Ford 84.8 mm) 3.317 3.3386 3.339 Top of piston above top of gudgeon pin hole N/A 0.901 0.900 N/A 0.900 0.900 Gudgeon pin diameter 0.515 0.515 0.515 0.812 0.812 Half the diameter of the gudgeon pin 0.258 0.406 Therefore top of piston above gudgeon pin centre is:- 1.158 1.306 Height of piston top above top ring 0.138 0.142 0.140 0.294 0.288 0.290 Therefore height of top of top piston ring from gudgeon pin centre 1.018 1.016 Below are a few of photos of the pistons. I have yet to draw out the bronze bushes that I need to make to fit to the Ford piston to the Humberette con rods. The Ford piston will slightly increase the compression ratio as the extra height of 0.147" which equates to 6.71cc's. I have given myself a bit of a break from the crankshaft assembly alignment for the time being and have been thinking about some machining I need to do to aid me. This is a plug that screws into the jug from the top, above the centre of the cylinder bore. I puzzled over the thread diameter and TPI as it seemed to be 3/4 x 17 TPI. It looks the same as the thread for the nuts for the big end pin? I tried one of these original big end nuts on the plug. It fitted perfectly. Now, what thread is it? It seems to be either 3/4" or 19mm and the pitch seems to be 1.5mm. The thread form appears to be Metric (60 degree) rather than the Whitworth thread form of 55 degrees. I do not have the gears, to cut metric threads on my big lathe, I also can't, at present, cut metric threads on my Myford lathe. I took the plunge and ordered a M19 x 1.5 tap and die, at great expense, it had to come from Germany. On arrival of the die . . . . I tried the die on the blanking plug and . . . . . . . . also on the big end. It fits like a glove! Now to get the extra gears I need for the Myford, so I can cut the metric threads on that machine. I think that this has answered the question as to what thread form Humber were using at this period in time on this engine.
    2 points
  21. My speedometers are not accurate. I was happy to get one cobbled together for each car, that will show mph when moving (not accurate) and will accumulate milage. Perhaps my magnets are weak. I found if I move the mph drum up or down, the change is not that great. If I lessen the return spring tension on the mph drum, I can get a better speed reading out of the drum, or it allows the drum to move farther, making it more accurate, but once in the car the real life experience is different than the bench experiment. With the car vibration, road bumps, and any cable fluctuations cause the mph drum to bounce wildly all over the place, not giving a steady reading. From experience, it sucks to spend so much time on this instrument, get it back in the car without scratching the dash too much, only to go out for a test drive and look down to see I am going 10 no 35 no 40 no 25 no 15 mph as I hit each bump in the road. Turns out that return spring is very important to dampen the mph drum. Don't take too much tension off it. An instrument restoration company restored a speedometer for my touring car, accomplished by the previous owner, at a cost close to $1000 I was told. They abandoned the horseshoe magnet and epoxied new magnets to the spinning wheel within the mph drum. It was inaccurate, and the mph drum bounced uncontrollably. I put original spare parts back in and it functions better and the drum is fairly stable, is just reads about 5 mph too slow, as all mine do, as checked with a GPS app on my phone.
    2 points
  22. I am continually amazed by all the Franklin expertise shared on this and the HHFC site. Thanks to all of you, from those who are trying to learn.
    2 points
  23. THE PRICE YOU ARE CONSIDERING IS RIGHT ON. 7-8k is about right. parted out it is worth that. If you are determined to sell it, put together your ads, ebay Craigslist or wherever. Just understand that you arent selling to a purist, who might offer you 3k.
    2 points
  24. OOH that one looks fairly bad. Although I have seen much worse. And yes, quite often misuse of the three arm rim spreader CAN do that kind of damage. I have straightened several similar rims over the years. Most of the ones I have straightened have been the 21 inch model T Ford rims of '25 to '27. I must tell you, that the Ford rims are made of a softer steel, and are actually quite easy to straighten. I have also straightened various Chevrolet (Jaxon) rims of the '20s, at least one 20 inch Studebaker rim from about '25, and a Buick Jaxon rim. All of those are made of tougher steel, and therefore harder to straighten. The method is basically the same. I somehow draw a circle or two on some flat cardboard. This is to help visualize the roundness of the rim. A double circle is better than a single, one matching the inner diameter, the other matching the outer diameter. I have used convenient round objects of the right size or a cobbled compass to draw the circles. Working from a nice FLAT area of concrete, driveway, garage floor etc, I get a good vision of just where and what direction the rim is bent wrong. Me? I use my car trailer tongue. Working from whichever side tweaks the rim right or left the proper direction, I slip the rim under the far side, and over the near side, and just use my weight to push the rim in or out as needed. Sometimes a C-clamp is needed to help hold the rim just right. Before going any further. One important detail! A small scrap of wood that fits neatly between the sides of the rim! You do not want to pry against the outer edges of the rim or you WILL get a whole new set of places that need to be straightened. The first time I tried this, I discovered this point the hard way, fortunately before serious harm was done. The small block of wood also serves to spread out the leverage and fulcrum points and helps get gentler bends which usually are what is needed. Work slow. Carefully check and determine what needs to be bent what way, work it a bit. Then recheck against the circles. Then work some more, either the same area, or another area. Just work your way around, a bit here, a bit there, slowly getting it closer and closer. Figure on checking and working at least ten, likely twenty, maybe thirty or more times to get it right. Depending upon just how bad your rim is. I find a nice flat concrete floor is adequate for testing flatness of the rim. Severe bends could require heat to shrink a stretched area on really bad rims. That can get really tricky. Occasionally, stand back and give the rim a good look. Sometimes one can spot a needed tweak that is missed up close. Bends tend to form just outside the fulcrum point. Using marking pen or crayon for a begin and end of desired bends can help to visualize where you need to apply the pressure. Always work the rim with the join clamp (whatever type it may have) NOT clamped, bolted, or otherwise attached. Let the ends of the rim float as free as they may. But also, always work the rim with the ends butted together so that you can keep an eye on how much things are moving, and which way. Also be careful of the rim. These things do like to bite! I don't know of any machines that are up to this task, although some specialized metal forming plant may have something. And I have never known any modern shop that I would trust to do this. But I have done several myself. I also straightened a friends 1925 Lincoln rim. Now, THAT one was a BEAR! And it wasn't even bent much. Outer edges of the rim (where the tire's bead pushes out against) are best tweaked using a large Crescent wrench. Some "monkey" wrenches might be able to do the job, and a Stillson (pipe) wrench might work, but car must be taken to not gouge up the rim with the Stillson's teeth. Bent rims should ALWAYS be checked for cracks forming anywhere, especially right on the outer area of the rim where the bead side turns up.
    2 points
  25. Hello Al, Well, it was a nice weekend with limited shopping. We went to Rotterdam, it is the largest harbor of Europe. Nice shopping, but very bad weather, a lot of wind and rain. So instead to continue shopping the whole Saturday, we went in the afternoon for a harbor tour by boat. We were impressed, a very busy harbor. Stayed the night over, and had a very good "surprise diner" at one of the restaurants (good wine too ๐Ÿ˜‹). Regards, Harm
    2 points
  26. My sister got tired of her Bring My Wallet and bought a Dodge. Maybe someone shot a Video of someone driving a Mini, would save the time finding one. Bob
    2 points
  27. All snug in their beds while visions of sugarplums danced in their heads...
    2 points
  28. Fall has hit here, it was sunny and 80 today. We went for a drive of about 50 miles. No pictures though.
    2 points
  29. Most T owners/fans around here would likely have more enjoyment and car show interest from this interesting speedster than their original black touring cars of this era. Would be interesting to know just when it was put together, possibly mid-late 1920's, a nearly 100 year old project of someones? Nice thing about this car is you could buy it and not change a thing, just keep it in tune. As many on here know, it is the re-build/restoration costs that usually make old cars so expensive to own.
    2 points
  30. This is the exact type of comment by anyone who says "it's just a used car". You're turning people away before they even get a chance to be a part of this club. Every person has an idea of what they like and what they don't. In 2033, a 2007 Magnum will be eligible to compete at AACA events. Have you seen that other people enter Vegas, Pintos and other "non-collectible" cars in these same shows? Do you walk up to them and tell them it's not a real collectible?
    2 points
  31. Very nice! That warm weather you have certainly helps. No salt on your roads. Up here in New England itโ€™s another story. The car looks great.
    2 points
  32. 34-35 Hudson 8 coupes do not pop up on the market very often. And some of the parts can be as hard to find as Auburn or Cord parts. All steel bodies, quality construction. An easy restoration/build, if the car is a complete solid car to start with. A 34-35 coupe has always been one of my must have cars. I was in the market for one a while back, could not find one. Settled for the Victoria body style (not giving up any styling) I think 34 is a better styled car, with grill/shell design and hood vents. I have owned one now, crossed off my must have list. Just one more Hudson on my must have list, and there is no settling on that one. I am a fan of the Hudson trucks, and could have a moment of automotive weakness, and end up owning another. The 49 Hudson Commodore coupe is almost done. And will be a fun car to drive around. (most likely in another State, still waiting Idaho) I would have jumped on the coupe if it was for sale when I bought this Victoria. The sweeping lines of the Victoria is tough to beat.
    2 points
  33. Stupid spellcheck! I typed in Roadmaster not toastmaster.
    2 points
  34. Beautiful car, Brooklyn Beer. We all missed out on that one. Glad it was bought by someone who really appreciates it, though. ๐Ÿ˜‰
    2 points
  35. The reception the Olds has gotten since Hershey is still surprising to me. Today I got my notification that the Olds did win a National award and the envelope had all the information about attending the banquet and other festivities in Philadelphia in February. All I can say is thank you to everyone who supported me from those with positive comments and technical help to those who judged and voted for it. Michelle and I are on a pretty cool ride right now with โ€œour little Oldsmobile โ€œ. We went out and had a nice celebratory dinner and drink tonight!
    2 points
  36. A Short and sweet. ๐Ÿคฃ
    1 point
  37. Check out this place....https://www.tomsbroncoparts.com/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMImfLEpOu65gIVxiCtBh2FzwuNEAAYASAAEgLugPD_BwE
    1 point
  38. Mark - parts are pulled and ready to mail. Won't guarantee today (look at the Missouri weather map ) Quote "I hope this old Marvel works after all of this!" End quote When you are playing with a Marvel carburetor, always remember the mechanic's joke that is older than me (73): "You have a Marvel? It will be a MARVEL if it works!" Jon.
    1 point
  39. Hugh as far as calibration, in the ad would their statement help at least on the bench?
    1 point
  40. 1 point
  41. Hello Harm, How was your shopping "spree"? I hope as rewarding for you as it likely was for Anna..... ๐Ÿ™‚ Al
    1 point
  42. I watched a documentary on Netflix about this old woman in the UK who collected hair clippings (really) for decades. She had giant garbage bags full of the stuff. Knowing this, I suppose there is hope for the Dodge Magnum.
    1 point
  43. Bad idea to cut a large hole in the side of your trailer. That is what you did by putting a side door in. Trailer manufacturers use framed flush doors for a reason. Height and width are limited so the trailer maintains structural integrity - there is a reason for a header support - just like a door in a structure. You destroyed the the sidewall integrity. That side gets the brunt of road vibration and hammering. Now it will start to flex - the crack the welds. Jim
    1 point
  44. Now I can sleep at night again.
    1 point
  45. Spent the afternoon and evening (late in the AM) trying to get at that rim. Biggest issue is the garage has been a catch all for both myself and son for years and now it's time to pay the piper if I want to get things done on the Limited. Still finding a few things of his and have them set aside for another drop off later. Had to continue taping some insulation on the garage door and replace some plastic on the ceiling where the coon pushed down the insulation. It's making a difference maintaining heat with my electric heater now only on the low setting. With that much completed I turned to the pile on the motor that while isn't in the way, just isn't helping my cause... (anyone need a nailhead? It's not a '57 or '58 so...). At this point and some thought I went to the lumber store and bought material to make a bench area to work from. Several trips out to the garbage can (and more to follow) but it will serve me well. I didn't get too far as it was really late by now but, to be continued.
    1 point
  46. My rebuilt shocks are back! Time to start getting the frame back together!
    1 point
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