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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/24/2019 in all areas

  1. Got the sheet metal off without issue and I'm very happy with the frame. Got all the pieces rough cut for the driver's side. I decided to scarf in some new wood on one piece rather than replacing it. The spirit of the restoration is to keep what can be kept and this piece certainly could be saved. Obviously the sill could not be nor the rib that goes on the front. It was broken at a critical point and was too thin to patch. The new sill still needs to be shaped and joinery is to come but I think I should get that done tomorrow.
    6 points
  2. Musk sure saved a lot of money on body forming dies with this one :).. That thing could be built with a press brake and a pop rivet gun. The armored glass is for the pedestrians throwing things at it. Musk is the modern equivalent of PT Barnum, I'll bet he snickers every time he makes some brash claim and a bunch of people agree with him. -Ron
    3 points
  3. Good to see you back. And glad you are mobile and pain free.
    3 points
  4. How come it is taboo to talk about "NEW" cars on this site unless it is about Tesla's?
    3 points
  5. Ed, the photo was taken during the era the car was new or nearly new as well. Personally I would not have the pilot ray light ( I like the single ones but the light looks to early for a car with skirted fenders) remove the spot lights ( I don't usually like spotlights at all on anything except on occasion one spotlight on the drivers windshield post a 1940s era car) the location and license plate frame well.......................I do like metal tire covers painted to match the body color, it lessens the bulls eye that the sphere shape of the tire adds to the side of the car. I do like white wa
    3 points
  6. I’m not saying there are no cold weather issues, what I’m saying is technology will continue to address them, including software controls to minimize the effect. Software has been an incredible tool to make improvements. Do you know who Thomas Selfridge is? He was the first airplane passenger killed when Orville Wright was demonstrating airplanes to the US government all happening in front of the President and military leaders of our country. Today that would be argued on the internet as the reason everyone who told the Wright Brothers travel by airplanes was an impossible drea
    3 points
  7. Al, thank you my good friend, and thank you to all who looked at this post and also were able to contribute! I am truly amazed at the response , and this is after 50+ years of my own contributions to club and commercial publications. This post has been mainly photographs about classic luxury cars of the pre war era and so we don't over load the one post I most likely will start up another similar post fairly soon to include both cars and trucks of the same era (but they would not have to be classic cars like we have here). This will happen but I will need to juggle my time to keep up with my
    3 points
  8. Another LHD PII, taken in New York City outside Inskip's in 1951.
    3 points
  9. ASSUMING THE CHOKE IS CORRECTLY ADJUSTED, AND COMPLETELY VERTICAL WHEN WARM (if not, fix it). There are two idle mixture control screws (brass screws, with the calibration held by a spring). These control the amount of idle fuel. These should be adjusted from 1/2 to 1 1/2 turn from lightly seated. So, suggestion: (A) with the engine cold, gently screw each idle mixture control screw clockwise UNTIL LIGHTLY SEATED, DO NOT OVERTIGHTEN. (B) record the number of turns for each (C) reset the screws as they were (D) start the engine, and
    3 points
  10. The crankcase bolted to my "boring bench", the bed of a lathe that was beyond repairing (and missing its legs) Since I have to make the boring bar, I needed to figure out just how far the tool has to be from the end to allow it to be withdrawn so I can re-set it. I also fnally figured out how the gearbox advances the boring bar so I'll have to make something for the rack that moves the box to attach to. All these details are incorporated in the machine but I'm only using the gearbox so I've some hard thinking to do to come up with a way to attach everything.
    3 points
  11. Not mine, found on Instagram Let me know if I can help w/contact
    2 points
  12. Speaking purely for myself, it's because new vehicles have become irrelevant to my life. My transport needs are met with a very cheap ,basic, offshore car. If I need a new car within the next 5 years or so I will just buy a used, very low mileage example of what I already own, and expect an easy further 10 years of use out of it. By then I will be 70+ and may not even need a car. They sold tens of thousands of them and even very clean low mileage examples are extremely cheap these days. New cars that I consider interesting have two glaring faults , cost, and local traffic law enforcement
    2 points
  13. The Tunick Brothers of Ct. had at least one if not two Brewster bodied Buick town cars of the 1937-38 era. I do not recall what series chassis they were on ( it wasn't the 90 series) but you could see them from the sidewalk at their place I believe in Greenwich? Ct. parked behind a chain link fence. Reasonably solid cars then not sure of their fate and they deteriorated rapidly as they were not under good cover or storage. All of this was 40+ years ago . Why do I remember all of this and can picture the cars clearly in my mind like it was yesterday when now if I get asked what medication
    2 points
  14. Harry Truman was the last true democrat elected to the job. A great president even if though he was left of center. He made hard decisions that too many people second guess today. A remarkable man, any way you look at him.
    2 points
  15. The first wheel is done! At first, I thought that the spokes having an elbow would simplify the construction. Well, not exactly: the spokes must be at the right length because when the elbow is going through the hole at the rim, the spoke must be almost at the appropriate hole at the hub. Well, it took a long time for the first one; now I have recorded the length from the 4 different spokes, this will simplify the assembly for the next wheels. It seems that my device to hold hub and rim was a good design: the finished wheel is turning perfectly true!
    2 points
  16. Wrong, the parts are the same, just nobodies buying them. BUT if you find someone who NEEDS a particular part there’s nothing ethically wrong with charging a fair price tha’s my story....
    2 points
  17. Nope. Nothing scary about a nailhead. The manual has it all.
    2 points
  18. Hello Al, Not quite, progress is a bit slow, but at least some. Making the joints is a lot of work, but measuring to get the body dimensional correct, takes a lot of time and thinking. Blow I show some pictures of the body as it is today. Tomorrow should be a nice day to do some sawing and planing outside. Furthermore some steam bending of wooden parts must be done. Have to build a steam box. The body is held together with some small screws, no glue yet. I use Bostik PK75 glue, very good stuff, but when it has set (takes 15 minutes to set
    2 points
  19. I have read this post and I am confused about the strategy. I also know the Kaiser engine and transmission history. You have a really nice car; maybe I am missing something, I don't know. By putting any V-8 in a 1949 Kaiser; is certainly going to change the balance of the car. When I say balance, I am using a broad term. The Engine change would alter the car, and it would be a modified. In some shows it would have to be put in a modified class. The picture of the car, you referenced, in Hemmings; is a modified car. Not only has the engine been changed; but it
    2 points
  20. The offset is a little shorter in length, in the picture above it is completely smooth still at the 6/10th mark. I will check later today but I think that there is a slight mismatch between the thick top side piece (under the scuttle) and the rib that runs down to the sill. I believe the offset is where this mismatch occurs. I remember thinking I had messed something up but went out and verified it on the parts car. Update: I checked and the passenger's side offset is a little longer, probably 1.75". I think somewhere around less than 2" should be fine. There is a cutout of
    2 points
  21. What could be purtier than this?
    2 points
  22. In an Owen Magnetic, the engine and rear end are not mechanically linked. The engine drives a generator which in turn powers an electric motor that turns the driveshaft. The speed of the gasoline engine was proportional to the generator's output and therefore the amount of current powering the electric motor (or maybe two motors, I don't remember). In that way, using the accelerator normally would make the car behave more or less like a regular car, just without a clutch or transmission. Kind of a clever work-around for the period that simplified operation. It was not, however, a hybrid in the
    2 points
  23. Clutches are easier to replace than synchros. Do it right and it's fine, yes, but do it wrong and you're causing a lot of extra wear. And even a little wrong adds more wear than simply using the clutch. Big rigs are different as their gearboxes are typically not synchronized and drivers learn to get it right pretty quickly because the sychros aren't there to mask the mistakes. Can you do it? Sure. Is it a good idea? Meh.
    2 points
  24. My car came with a plain teardrop radiator cap which I assume is a reproduction as it is made out of stamped sheetmetal. Wanting an upgrade I looked for the 33-34 Phoenix cast mascot on Ebay. Quite a few available in very different conditions and prices but I found an original with an exterior finish that matched the car and that also had an intact but rusty bayonet base. At the same time I bought the mascot I ordered a new repro bayonet piece from The Filling Station. Once everything showed up I started soaking the two base screws in penetrant. It took a week and a half for them to free up bu
    2 points
  25. It was on June 18th of 2018 that I joined the AACA and made one of my first posts on the forum titled “looking for owners of Cole Motor Cars. At the time I had a 1913 Cole Series 9 Touring Car. Since then, it has been a whirlwind 16 months for my 19 year old son and me! Over that period of time we 1. Acquired two more Cole motor cars 2. Made lots of friends, connections, and relaunched the Cole registry at www.colemotorcarregistry.com 3. Organized a Cole owners meetup this spring with ten Coles in attendance 4, Helped the Gilmore Car Museum put together a special
    1 point
  26. I see a DB Victory Six hiding back there!
    1 point
  27. After 30 minutes of flushing it was time to get everything buttoned up. Installed a new distribution tube and it slid in nice. Just a couple good whacks to set it. Did not feel any scale holding me back. Flushed the radiator and put everything back together and off for a 20 mile ride. These results pleased me and when I got home I laser heat checked the back to front. Every spot was within 3 degree's of each other and not the 30 + the back was showing. I am sure there is more scale that will break loose over time and come spring I will be running the evapo rust again. But for now I am very
    1 point
  28. I think the Avanti was a subliminal dig at Goldwater. But a customized Jag. Who woulda thought? And you are right. That is one car you would want in your collection. Very cool.
    1 point
  29. I found with my poorly rebuilt 54 264 the cam, lifters and push rods are new and for a 56. If the geometry is right she'll run. Can't mix years. I reused the cam, rods but replaced the lifters. Cam was not wiped after starting for the first run in. Reused the .30 pistons. I was either blessed with a happy running rebuild or I RTM and took the advice from those that have rebuilt them. I'm saying it is a bit of both.
    1 point
  30. You worry too much.... Ken built a good engine and a nut on a rod cap shattered (never heard of before); he came up with a fix. Myself, even after his experience, I would just re-use parts like I did on all the nailheads I had a hand in building. The problems I have had is with machine shops: you need to double check their work! And I can tell you where to check.
    1 point
  31. ...and guidance here...
    1 point
  32. Back on my feet, no pain, totally mobile, no crutches, cane or walker. I can finally get back to Daphne! The machine shop I mentioned earlier did a great job on the steering box and only charged me 25 bucks. The before picture shows the roached threads; not a pretty sight. The after shot looks a lot cleaner. not perfect, but a vast improvement. And you can't replace missing metal. They also cleaned up the housing threads. Now the two pieces screw together easily by hand. No binding or drag.
    1 point
  33. For those of you that like Pics, Dan shared these with me. Wow, She is a beauty
    1 point
  34. I don't believe this picture has ever been published before. It is up for auction and there is a separate thread discussing it.
    1 point
  35. Cleaned and re-greased and reassembled. However, top adjuster locknut is seized solid. That's on the to-do list. At least I know why that brake was so poor. Phil
    1 point
  36. If Tesla wanted to branch out from cars and build something they could sell they should be making taxicabs and urban buses. Forget the hiway trucks and pickup trucks, build something electric vehicles are ideally suited for, and that there is a steady demand for.
    1 point
  37. I checked my sources.....the car isn't at the collection I thought it was at. (Marin county, California) For any great car, when you need information, there is always one or two individuals who have the true background on each individual manufacture. I'm a Pierce Arrow guy.......and I get and am able to answer the majority of the questions put to me. When it comes to the super exotic pre war mega dollar stuff.....there's just one go to guy in the field.............no questions asked........See the photo below for his contact info. He not only knows all pre war mega cars like no one else.....
    1 point
  38. $200 too high? That 2% made a deal fall through? Of course I could say that about the seller AND the prospective buyer! I hope that is a misprint.
    1 point
  39. Sounds like it's time to start a new thread about starting problems. 😎
    1 point
  40. You are talking about EBIT. I didn't run it that way because more info is needed and I had to make enough assumptions as it was. Used 1981 pricing though was a bit light on MSRP, was $18K and change. The point was to show the burden that initial investment imposes deep into a program's life cycle. We don't know what the real numbers were, i just tried to get them in the right zip code.
    1 point
  41. PII Henley roadster parked on a street in Cambridge..c. 1949
    1 point
  42. Great thread and nice work getting her running........ I’ve some good luck over the years waking up engines that have not run in decades. If you still have an irksome tick or tap..... drain that warm up oil, change filter (inspect the can and filter for metallic stuff). Refill with 4 qt.s of lighter weight oil and one quart of either Marvel Mystery oil or an engine cleaning solvent like Rislone. Get it up to operating temperature and vary the rpms up and down for a good amount of time. Shut it off let the oil drain back into pan, then do it again.
    1 point
  43. "And exactly how did those foot prints git on the headliner of my car young man?"
    1 point
  44. And if a bull had udders it would be a cow.
    1 point
  45. Got my new AACA Christmas cards and did a little 'colorization"
    1 point
  46. By the way, you will never have easier access to replace the brake lines and rear wheel cylinders than right now. Looking at the pictures it is something else I would recommend.
    1 point
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