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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/27/2019 in all areas

  1. It is pretty late in the season here in Southern Maine. Still a pretty fine day, though.
    5 points
  2. Back to the MGA again today. First, got a call from the British Car shop. My engine is still not ready. They had another engine on their test stand that had issues, so everything is pushed back. I'm okay with it, as the shop is now communicating with me properly after my complaint. Now it's looking like Nov 9th when the engine will be ready. In the meantime, I'm going to attack the outer body panels and get them in better shape. I started back up with the front valence panel, which has been very challenging before. The initial large tear in the metal has re-opened 3 times now, so I've cut out a patch around it instead, the metal is just too thin and it's become a patchwork of patches (Photo 3). With about 2/3 of the tear, it has still kept, but this 1/3 keeps opening up. I also cut out some other bad areas and have welded in some fresh metal (Photos 1 & 2). I feel I've reached another level with my welding, I think I'm getting the hang of it and (with good metal), I think I can call myself "satisfactory." Still have a long way to go to get to the level of some of the folks on the site. I did some further banging on the panel and applied a nice coat of filler over the lower portion of the panel to see where I stand. I've done a lot of hammering on it, so it's not that bad, really. The upper part, which was spared from damage from the bumper being in front of it needs minimal pitting fill. I just need to weld in one more patch where the large tear in the metal was (again, photo 3), and it should be ready for a couple coats of etching primer, then I'll start sanding. Here's the whole panel (Photo 4), just before I cut out the square area and called it a day. Not bad so far, considering it looked like someone drove it through a parking lot full of anvils when I started. Last, I'm working on cleaning up the dozens and dozens of nuts, bolts, washers, and shims that hold on the 4 fenders. As always, will always try to reuse any part that's original, restorable, and safe, rather than use new or repro. Pretty easy work, but it's something like 270 individual pieces all told. Still thinking about how great Hershey was this year, too. Found an NOS door striker for my 1930 Plymouth in the bottom of a crate, an NOS vacuum wiper motor for my the same car, and found an NOS overflow tank cap and NOS oil filter for my '74 Camaro, among other great parts, signs, and other deals. A lot of good deals if you dug a little deeper and haggled, amongst all the rip-off artists there. Also saw some amazing cars that give me a really high bar to live up to with my resto.
    4 points
  3. I would try some evaporust thermocure in it and see if improves the radiator efficiency. https://evapo-rust.com/thermocure/
    4 points
  4. I spent some time this weekend to convert the gauges from International to Crosley. I ordered the decal set and repainted the gauge faces and needles, then applied the decals. I will apply the "Crosley" decal to the center of the trim and then seal everything back up and install it soon. This has been the holdout for getting the FOR running, so hopefully it will be running soon.
    3 points
  5. Yesterday at Bradley, Maine. The foliage is past peak but still it was a wonderful crisp Fall day.
    3 points
  6. Around Acadia in Maine last week
    3 points
  7. I keep this car up the street at my Dad's, so it's not like it's inconvenient, but I just don't get to it on the weekends as much as I should. I'm reminded of this when I do get it out and find out what a great driver it is. My grandfather bought it new in '63 and did over 100,000 miles of touring based out of New Jersey. He gave it to me in 1977 and I managed to not ruin it. Body and interior are original, engine and transmission have been rebuilt. It is a beautiful car, and not one you want to have to restore, given the miles of wiring and vacuum lines!
    3 points
  8. Hi John, I will try the evapo-rust to see if it helps and I wish it would. Still going to try and buy the other radiator because the price is right. Have considered the brassworks option but it will be a last resort as it’s about a $4-5000 dollar one to make it in the honeycomb. I ask him a while back. No thermostat in a Olds, it has radiator shutters for heat control. The bottom water feed to the pump on the Olds is mostly pipe with just two short lengths of hose to join the ends. The side water jacket has a NOS Dorman brand cover with built in deflection plate so all those boxes have been checked so to speak. Pretty sure it’s now just the radiator.
    3 points
  9. Late to the game, but congrats on the award(s)! I was able to see your car at Hershey and was simply blown away. Just a fantastic restoration.
    3 points
  10. I milled the sides of the water pump clamp down using the base as the register point. In as much as I can measure, the sides are now perpendicular to the base. It is just about the right size...of course given Mitchell precision, the saddle is wider on one side than the other but not by much. The engine stand was given to me by a friend who was the auto shop teacher at a local High School. When they closed down the department (because, of course, no one needs to know that stuff any more) they threw it in the dumpster. My 3-jaw chuck, small 4-jaw and 3/4 Jacobs chuck came from the same dumpster. Most of the day was spent thinking about how to go about the next steps and looking to see if I already had what I'll need. Not to surprisingly, I had more than I'd thought and didn't have what I thought I did have. I'll have to order some materials but not too much. I also put this "dummy" cam shaft in. It is 1" bar with a long keyway. This will be part of the setup to line bore the saddles. In the middle you can see what's left of the cheesy Mitchell center cam bearing. Rather than make a real bearing they used a spring loaded piece to press down on the cam against Babbitt "half bearing." Making something to replace this will be a real challenge... even if I wanted to keep it, it would be a major problem because pouring Babbitt into an oil soaked aluminum case is not a good idea and it would still have to be bored. I have an idea but I am certain it will change before I make anything. When all the machine work is done I plan to have the case vapor degreased. I also plan to bore out the old main bearings and make bronze shells that can be Babbitted.
    3 points
  11. Sorry to hear about the issues with the Olds. You will get it all figured out and repaired properly. It will be a distant memory after your back on the road and enjoying it again.
    3 points
  12. 3 points
  13. Al. If the market was dying, the cars wouldn't be selling. What is happening is the market is shifting to a different type of buyer: buyers who are not interested in paying extravagant prices, especially for project cars. In my opinion, there will always be a market for old cars -- a butt for every seat, as they say -- but a price drop is good for the hobby as it gets these cars into the hands of people that can afford them. That's not to say that periodic price increases is not good, either, as without higher values, many reproduction parts would never have been made, and many "lesser" body styles would have never been restored to the quality we have seen. Also, today's general-car buyers tend not to put together a whole collection of cars as the collectors of the past. That may change, however, as prices drop to certain levels.
    3 points
  14. I'm pretty sure this is the side cover plate to a factory jack which was used by several marques. I've seen Cadillac and Wills Sainte Claire "script" jacks with the same-shaped side cover. Can't guess the price, except to say (1) it's a great wall hanger for a Lincoln collector, and (2) if a Lincoln collector has a jack with another marque's name on it, he/she might be interested. That is, it's no gold mine but shouldn't be scrapped.
    2 points
  15. Custom Built, 1930 Model A 4X4 extended cab Pick up truck.... It is Not a hot rod and Not a rat rod.... It is a practical... daily driver, Vintage 4X4 truck.... If you would like a Model A pickup, But you are a 'big' man, and are not comfortable, squeezed into an 'A' cab.... and you would like to drive it all winter, on icy, snowy roads.... Not to mention being able to keep up with traffic, on today's busy roads......... You might like the look and feel of this truck..... Hopefully, not considered 'molested', but, 'upgraded'.... Located in Southern New Mexico..... I am willing to pay Half the shipping to, anywhere in the USA I boxed and extended, the frame to be able to mount the 1930 body, which came from a model 170-B 'Blind back' 4 door sedan, that was really in very poor condition. All the wooden framework was rotten, So... I replaced it all with a custom formed, tubular steel framework. I wanted a pickup cab that had abundant leg room ( I'm 6' 4" 200 lbs.) So, I used the back of the sedan and 1/2 of the rear doors & windows to create a extended cab for the pickup. The entire cab and floor are sound proofed and insulated. All new, lightly tinted safety glass installed, with new window channels and regulators... The gas tank, (that used to sit in your lap), was removed and a new steel dash with glove box and gauges from the 1983 Toyota 4X4, truck, installed. (pre-computer) New motor and transmission mounts created, and a removable transmission cross member bolted in and three other cross members welded into the lengthened frame.It has a very low mileage 22R four cylinder engine (105 Hp) A new Weber carb, with manual choke, New 3 core aluminum Radiator installed (never over heats)... New heavy duty clutch/pressure plate, new fuel & water pumps,Timing chain kit, and new alternator & regulator, hoses & belts.... New 6 ply tires, New brake lines & radius rods installed All new leaf springs (front and rear), new coil over shocks (front & rear) spare tire mount installed under pickup bed in the back. rebuilt 5 speed tranny, where 5th gear acts as an overdrive, over 50 mph. The 4x4 is a solid front axle, with manual hubs.. and works perfectly. it has power brakes (disc in front, drum in rear) New rack & pinion steering.The Body was welded, sanded, primed and painted with enamel paint, (Black fenders & dark forest green cab,hood and bed). New headlight lens, reflectors with halogen high & low beams, new tail/brake lights, with led turn signals front & rear. Very comfortable, adjustable, bucket seats, with seat belts. Good strong Heater with windshield defroster. Ahooga horn and new windshield wiper motor and blade. Clear title in my name, licensed & insured as my daily driver... Very dependable & easy to drive. Valued at $15,000 contact, Sunny 505-990-6008 sunnybabaspirit@yahoo.com Located in southern New Mexicomany more detailed photos upon request Thank you for taking the time to consider this Truck... I will consider trades for a good running , older restoration, or original survivor ..... 1929-1934 Sedan ...
    2 points
  16. The ‘55 is sold and went to a great home to someone who will appreciate it. I’m sure it will remind him driving back in the 50’s. Avanti Bill is a great guy not only for the professional transport but hooking up his father in law with a Great car that will remind him of his high school years. Have fun guys!!
    2 points
  17. Terry B ..... Basically I Love the 1920's and early 1930's lines on the vehicles of those years (1924-1934)... sedans, coupes, roadsters and touring.... The sweeping fenders the radiators and louvered hoods, the big headlights, etc..... and I have owned and driven, stock, original, model A's and a 1929 Dodge, 1930 Chevrolet, 1930 Chrysler, 1928 Dodge ... anyway... I Love the 'stepping back in time'... of a slower pace of life... where people were not in a hurry, and a man's word and his hand shake could be trusted.... But lately, (last 10 years) I have been building vintage cars & trucks, from the frame up.... sedans and pickups mostly (late 20's & early 30's) and keeping the old body look (even the wooden spokes on the wheels) and upgrading to 4 cylinder & V6 engines ... putting in modern syncro transmissions (4&5 speeds) and improving the steering and brakes.... to make them travel long distances, Safely,... at freeway speeds Also making parts easy to find and easy to work on yourself .. (no computer).......... I don't want them to be Hot Rods or Ratty rods... just nice looking vintage styling.... in appearance, with modern mechanical running gear.. Now a days I am building custom made Gypsy Wagon Campers and sheep wagon campers and Conestoga style campers.... Below is a photo of a 29 pickup I built 8 years ago, and it has the same exact running gear as this one above has (22R engine, 4x4 and 5 speed) It sold for $16K, 8 years ago the second photo is of it pulling one of my gypsy wagon campers on a 2,000 mile road trip .... People LOVE them... every where they go.... they leave a wake of smiles and happiness... 😊 😋 😎
    2 points
  18. Ted, I'm going nuts going back and forth at those pictures.... all great..... I would probably go with #6..... Steve
    2 points
  19. This is such a persistent myth but it isn't true. Detergent oil is probably a misnomer and I wish they would have chosen something else. It doesn't "clean" the engine. It merely holds the dirt in suspension better so it can be caught in the filter. In old cars using non-detergent oils, dirt would settle out in the pan because the oil couldn't hold it in suspension. That's why it's a good idea to drop the pan and clean it out on a new-to-you car. But there is no danger of a detergent oil "breaking off dirt" and pushing it through the rest of the engine. Sounds reasonable when you think about it, but that's not what happens. I am not a fan of additives. They can be mis-used and mis-marketed and many are flat-out vaporware that do nothing. The zinc crisis is the same as the unleaded gas crisis--a grain of truth buried under an avalanche of extrapolation, rumor, and anecdotal evidence. Zinc is most beneficial to cars with high-lift, flat-tappet camshafts and heavy spring pressures. That means race cars and a [very] few muscle cars. How much zinc is enough is a topic of much discussion; there is no "too little" but there is most certainly a "too much," which, again, isn't a known quantity. It is my belief that in at least 90% of cars that qualify for the AACA, extra zinc is not needed. One, most are not high-lift, high-spring-pressure performance engines and even some of the most potent engines of the '60s don't really need excessive protecting. Two, most of us drive these old cars sparingly and like they're made of glass--they're already going to outlast us all; dumping in additives to add to that already incredibly long lifespan seems like a waste of money. And three, if you do it wrong, you will hurt your engine. Whatever magical solutions people recommend, they're free to use them. Most won't hurt. I feel that it's throwing money away, but if it's your money, go ahead and spend it. But unless your car bucks and snarls and won't idle below 1000 RPM and each cylinder fire is something you can feel in your chest, your engine probably isn't radical enough to benefit from more zinc than is already in the oil. It's just another thing that has been blown all out of proportion and then paralyzed by over-analysis. A bit of marketing on behalf of the additive makers doesn't hurt either--do you suppose Jay Leno was perhaps paid to use that additive in that segment? There is no answer. There can be no answer. Spend your money or don't. I suspect the result will be the same.
    2 points
  20. No harm ever in having an extra radiator - go for it !
    2 points
  21. Ah, now were getting to the heart of the engine! I've been looking forward to this part of the build. That's an odd looking camshaft set-up. It looks as though they were relying to some degree on valve spring pressure to keep the shaft located in it's centre bearing. Are there any machined faces under there that would accept a bearing cap? Hopefully you have access to a proper line boring machine. Or perhaps you have previous experience in this field. I attempted my first home-made boring bar job recently, and it was a little tricky to get it right. I certainly cannot offer guidance, as I am a complete novice in this field. But if I may mention two unexpected pitfalls which I did not anticipate when thinking it through. One was the shape of the single HSS cutting tool. Too much rake in the grind, and the cutter will dig into the alloy bearing surface. The small amount of flex in the 36 mm bar, combined with the necessary clearance in the home made bushings supporting it, allowed the cutter to dig in if you went too hard or attempted more than .003"-.005' each cut. Just barely enough back-rake to give clearance seemed to work best. The other problem was that I needed more clearance for the scurf to flow out of the bearing. And more scurf clearance on the boring bar increases the possibility of flex. So it was a slow job. I tapped a stud into the end of the bar in order to drive it with a cordless drill, and then controlled the feed with my other hand against the other end of the bar. I final-finished with a brake cylinder hone on an extension bar. Primitive and agricultural, no doubt, but the camshaft now has a nice feel, with close to my target clearance of .003" in each of the four bearings. Hopefully it will hold up OK. Good luck with yours, JV. It seems to have a lot of camshaft spanning between bearings. Is the shaft only one inch, or is that just the size of the test set-up?
    2 points
  22. Our HCCA group had a "Last Chance Run" today, before the bad weather really sets in. There wasn't much colourful foliage to see but we had a great 45 mile drive. Peter, in British Columbia.
    2 points
  23. This !!!!! And make sure it's the tech people, not the sales department, or your likely to get totally different info. When I was first learning about engine repair an old mechanic once told me,... "it's good to get your info right from the horse's mouth. But you need to be smart enough to know which end of the horse your talking with." Paul
    2 points
  24. That picture could be on the cover of a magazine.
    2 points
  25. Looking good Chris, keep it up ! Steve
    2 points
  26. Without his Bertillon measurements, I guess we'll never know. 😉
    2 points
  27. A honeycomb clogs pretty easily and is not that easy to clean out via its design. I guess you could try the evapo-rust stuff first and see if you can improve upon it even prior to taking it to a radiator shop. That being said, you did such a nice job on the car, I would be tempted to have a new core made by Brassworks. And, not sure about what you have for a thermostat, but make sure that is working properly. Also, make sure you do not have a hose collapsing from water pump suction (it will only collapse at speed/under load - aka generally not in the garage while looking at it). Does it have a water distribution tube in the block ?
    2 points
  28. Sorry to hear that Ted..... I hope it all works out for you. Steve
    2 points
  29. Got the head back on a couple days ago. Ended up installing 13 Time Serts into the block. I only left 11 bores untouched. The ten holes along the manifold side were in very good shape. I assume the motor being hotter in that area possibly prevented the block from rusting as much as other parts even though all are in the water jacket. The opposite side has only 6 so the torque load is also spread a greater range on the off side of the manifold. The motor is 87-88 years old and who knows how many valve jobs were done on it and how many times the head had been on and off. Simple metal fatigue, wear, and age all played a part in slowly eroding the holes. I used a dial indicator and if I had more than .030 movement to the bolt, I installed the insert. Sprayed the new gasket with copper spray gasket maker on both sides and put it on the block, installed the head on top, and started installing each head bolt after coating each bolt with Permatex gray ultra. Working in the correct pattern I started with 40lbs, went to 50lbs, then finished them at 65lbs. I went back later after an hour and torqued them all again to 65lbs. Let the motor sit for over 24hrs to let all the sealer cure then filled it with a 50/50 mix of distilled water and green antifreeze. Fired it up yesterday and took it for a ride. It stayed at 160 for a fairly long time then when I increased my speed, it increased to 180 for a fair amount of time then again, started to climb. Nothing like before where it immediately got hot and bubbled. No bubbles this time but still climbed to 200 as I pulled in the yard. This time I was armed with my laser thermometer and took some temps off the rear of the radiator and the head. The head was 200 in most all locations. The top of the radiator center was 185 and the middle center was 160, bottom center was 155. Drivers side top was 140, mid was 120, bottom 120. Passenger side (about a good 6" of width from outside edge was 104 top, 104 mid, 104 bottom. So, my issue is the flow of the radiator for sure now. It seems I had two issues originally, blow by and radiator. I believe whats happening is when driving at speed, the water pumps up into the top of the radiator and it can't flow through fast enough nore cool enough. The water at the top reservoir is being forced out the over flow tube so eventually the motor can't get enough water, nevermind cool enough water, to keep it from getting hot. I was fortunate to locate a 32' Olds radiator and we in negotiations right now about it. Want to get it checked out and cleaned, then when I pull my current radiator out, I can replace it immediately to get the car back on the road without wait. And here I was hoping my restoration was going to be all done so I could just enjoy this car. Not to be as of right now!
    2 points
  30. It will be relisted due to non-paying bidder. That was not a realistic bid, someone was playing around. My guess is that the seller had two buddies he asked to bid on it to drive up the price but they weren't told about each other and were pushing numbers up without knowing they were working against each other.
    2 points
  31. Got notified this morning that the Sherwin Williams calendar for 2020 is already set for printing so my 32' Olds will be going into the 2021 calendar instead. Pretty cool.
    2 points
  32. Are you talking about the RM auction? The outside tents are open to anyone to see the cars, assuming you can find a parking spot at the Lodge. As for the auction itself, I don't think RM is in the business of providing entertainment to someone that isn't going to buy a car.
    1 point
  33. There is a guy in NJ named Doug Hull who can fix that fender. He is busy but call him 201 230 3300.
    1 point
  34. Maybe the guys with big money. 100 G and over to spend on cars, just want to buy done cars as they have all been burned out on projects, often probably buying something that looks good, only to find out it all needs to be done over to be up to their snuff.
    1 point
  35. I like the Danbury Mint items....
    1 point
  36. Try Best Offer Counts in Sellersville, Pa. He has a web site also. I just got some parts for my 64 from him.
    1 point
  37. I use Valvoline VR-1 racing oil in my 1961 Mercury engine. High zinc levels #1 Selling Racing Motor Oil Specifically formulated for race-level protection in all classic and modern high-performance vehicles, including flat-tappet and performance cam engines High zinc and phosphorus formula for extreme anti-wear protection Formulated to maximize horsepower
    1 point
  38. Catholic converters? Does the Pope know about this? 😀. Maybe catalytic converters is what you mean. Some people use Diesel engine oil for that reason, the other oil that had higher zinc was motorcycle oil but now most new motorcycles have catalytic converters so the zinc level in the oil might have been reduced.
    1 point
  39. Thanks for bringing it back. Just in time for me. I just got that 1914 bought that we talked about. Car number 6119. I'll get it in the registry soon and I'm sure I'll be asking for plenty of input
    1 point
  40. Sidenote: Having just done this project this past weekend on a Cadillac and dealing with non-fitting parts due to shrinkage, I will tell you that I spent a good 15-20 hours with the Dremel tool matched to about 60 dollars in various tips/tools for it. When finished on the castings, I then had to deal with the broken bakelite - I used 3M auto panel body adhesive in black (they use the product to glue on sheet metal repair panels). Also, was kind of a pain as it takes a special calk gun and the adhesive is somewhat expensive. I was at AutoZone this week and saw JB weld or Peramatex had a small tube of panel adhesive that you hand mix the two parts 50/50 - I picked up a tube and will try it today on a repair to the steering wheel (I have been using the 3M panel adhesive to repair steering wheels - black, sandable. polishable, and ... - not a perfect black color match, but pretty good nevertheless). I also use the panel adhesive to repair the one piece of sector die cast the fellow who made parts did not reproduced- seems he made what was broken on his car only.
    1 point
  41. The minutes for 9/18/2019 have been posted on the BCA web site.
    1 point
  42. Our 1925-45 "REMLEY" in soft focus. Our 1925-25 "Beulah" with wife Joan driving.
    1 point
  43. Taken at Lake Rotoiti NZ during the NZ Packard Clubs National Rally in 2014. Sorry there are no Autumn(Fall) colours(colors). Packards at Lake Rotoiti 2014.html
    1 point
  44. The engine block has been cleaned and painted (wow, what a bunch of gunk inside!) and reinstalled on new mounts. The head is off and in the process of being checked and cleaned.
    1 point
  45. Here are some shots during the wet sanding process. Lots of labor and love
    1 point
  46. I didn't realize I had two different sized winder escutcheons (thanks to Grandpa, here on the forum, for pointing it out!) It seems the longer window winders have a taller escutcheon, presumably to keep the end of the winder off of the door panel. Luckily, I have both of mine, but one is pretty beat up. $ounds like another item for refini$hing...ugg. The first "side-by-side" photo is one I found on Bill Anderson's website. If you guys haven't visited the site, it's well worth it: Anderson Automotive Enterprises
    1 point
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