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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/27/2019 in all areas

  1. It is pretty late in the season here in Southern Maine. Still a pretty fine day, though.
    5 points
  2. Back to the MGA again today. First, got a call from the British Car shop. My engine is still not ready. They had another engine on their test stand that had issues, so everything is pushed back. I'm okay with it, as the shop is now communicating with me properly after my complaint. Now it's looking like Nov 9th when the engine will be ready. In the meantime, I'm going to attack the outer body panels and get them in better shape. I started back up with the front valence panel, which has been very challenging before. The initial large tear in the metal has re-opened 3 times no
    4 points
  3. I would try some evaporust thermocure in it and see if improves the radiator efficiency. https://evapo-rust.com/thermocure/
    4 points
  4. I spent some time this weekend to convert the gauges from International to Crosley. I ordered the decal set and repainted the gauge faces and needles, then applied the decals. I will apply the "Crosley" decal to the center of the trim and then seal everything back up and install it soon. This has been the holdout for getting the FOR running, so hopefully it will be running soon.
    3 points
  5. This is such a persistent myth but it isn't true. Detergent oil is probably a misnomer and I wish they would have chosen something else. It doesn't "clean" the engine. It merely holds the dirt in suspension better so it can be caught in the filter. In old cars using non-detergent oils, dirt would settle out in the pan because the oil couldn't hold it in suspension. That's why it's a good idea to drop the pan and clean it out on a new-to-you car. But there is no danger of a detergent oil "breaking off dirt" and pushing it through the rest of the engine. Sounds reasonable when you think about it
    3 points
  6. Yesterday at Bradley, Maine. The foliage is past peak but still it was a wonderful crisp Fall day.
    3 points
  7. Around Acadia in Maine last week
    3 points
  8. This !!!!! And make sure it's the tech people, not the sales department, or your likely to get totally different info. When I was first learning about engine repair an old mechanic once told me,... "it's good to get your info right from the horse's mouth. But you need to be smart enough to know which end of the horse your talking with." Paul
    3 points
  9. I keep this car up the street at my Dad's, so it's not like it's inconvenient, but I just don't get to it on the weekends as much as I should. I'm reminded of this when I do get it out and find out what a great driver it is. My grandfather bought it new in '63 and did over 100,000 miles of touring based out of New Jersey. He gave it to me in 1977 and I managed to not ruin it. Body and interior are original, engine and transmission have been rebuilt. It is a beautiful car, and not one you want to have to restore, given the miles of wiring and vacuum lines!
    3 points
  10. Hi John, I will try the evapo-rust to see if it helps and I wish it would. Still going to try and buy the other radiator because the price is right. Have considered the brassworks option but it will be a last resort as it’s about a $4-5000 dollar one to make it in the honeycomb. I ask him a while back. No thermostat in a Olds, it has radiator shutters for heat control. The bottom water feed to the pump on the Olds is mostly pipe with just two short lengths of hose to join the ends. The side water jacket has a NOS Dorman brand cover with built in deflection plate so all those boxes have been ch
    3 points
  11. Late to the game, but congrats on the award(s)! I was able to see your car at Hershey and was simply blown away. Just a fantastic restoration.
    3 points
  12. I milled the sides of the water pump clamp down using the base as the register point. In as much as I can measure, the sides are now perpendicular to the base. It is just about the right size...of course given Mitchell precision, the saddle is wider on one side than the other but not by much. The engine stand was given to me by a friend who was the auto shop teacher at a local High School. When they closed down the department (because, of course, no one needs to know that stuff any more) they threw it in the dumpster. My 3-jaw chuck, small 4-jaw and 3/4 Jacobs chu
    3 points
  13. Sorry to hear about the issues with the Olds. You will get it all figured out and repaired properly. It will be a distant memory after your back on the road and enjoying it again.
    3 points
  14. 3 points
  15. Al. If the market was dying, the cars wouldn't be selling. What is happening is the market is shifting to a different type of buyer: buyers who are not interested in paying extravagant prices, especially for project cars. In my opinion, there will always be a market for old cars -- a butt for every seat, as they say -- but a price drop is good for the hobby as it gets these cars into the hands of people that can afford them. That's not to say that periodic price increases is not good, either, as without higher values, many reproduction parts would never have been made, and many "lesser" body s
    3 points
  16. I'm pretty sure this is the side cover plate to a factory jack which was used by several marques. I've seen Cadillac and Wills Sainte Claire "script" jacks with the same-shaped side cover. Can't guess the price, except to say (1) it's a great wall hanger for a Lincoln collector, and (2) if a Lincoln collector has a jack with another marque's name on it, he/she might be interested. That is, it's no gold mine but shouldn't be scrapped.
    2 points
  17. Custom Built, 1930 Model A 4X4 extended cab Pick up truck.... It is Not a hot rod and Not a rat rod.... It is a practical... daily driver, Vintage 4X4 truck.... If you would like a Model A pickup, But you are a 'big' man, and are not comfortable, squeezed into an 'A' cab.... and you would like to drive it all winter, on icy, snowy roads.... Not to mention being able to keep up with traffic, on today's busy roads......... You might like the look and feel of this truck..... Hopefully, not considered 'molested', but, 'upgraded'.... Located in Southern New Mexico..... I am willing
    2 points
  18. The ‘55 is sold and went to a great home to someone who will appreciate it. I’m sure it will remind him driving back in the 50’s. Avanti Bill is a great guy not only for the professional transport but hooking up his father in law with a Great car that will remind him of his high school years. Have fun guys!!
    2 points
  19. Terry B ..... Basically I Love the 1920's and early 1930's lines on the vehicles of those years (1924-1934)... sedans, coupes, roadsters and touring.... The sweeping fenders the radiators and louvered hoods, the big headlights, etc..... and I have owned and driven, stock, original, model A's and a 1929 Dodge, 1930 Chevrolet, 1930 Chrysler, 1928 Dodge ... anyway... I Love the 'stepping back in time'... of a slower pace of life... where people were not in a hurry, and a man's word and his hand shake could be trusted.... But lately, (last 10 years) I have been building vintage cars & trucks,
    2 points
  20. Ted, I'm going nuts going back and forth at those pictures.... all great..... I would probably go with #6..... Steve
    2 points
  21. No harm ever in having an extra radiator - go for it !
    2 points
  22. Ah, now were getting to the heart of the engine! I've been looking forward to this part of the build. That's an odd looking camshaft set-up. It looks as though they were relying to some degree on valve spring pressure to keep the shaft located in it's centre bearing. Are there any machined faces under there that would accept a bearing cap? Hopefully you have access to a proper line boring machine. Or perhaps you have previous experience in this field. I attempted my first home-made boring bar job recently, and it was a little tricky to get it right. I certainly cannot offer guidan
    2 points
  23. Our HCCA group had a "Last Chance Run" today, before the bad weather really sets in. There wasn't much colourful foliage to see but we had a great 45 mile drive. Peter, in British Columbia.
    2 points
  24. I read all the comments made on this forum concerning what oil to use, however, when it comes to making a choice of what lubricant to use in any of my vehicles or machinery I always contact the technical department of whatever oil company I am using at the time. I have never had an issue when their advice has been followed. Quite frankly I would never follow some of the oil grade recommendations I have read on this forum for old cars whether or not they have been newly reconditioned or have done quite a few miles. I have always found the technical staff of oil companies quite kn
    2 points
  25. But for early engines, we should assess whether our oil temperature rises enough to achieve the viscosity on the right side of the hyphen. A friend who owned a 1917 Pierce 66 for many years added temperature senders to his oil pan and found that his oil temperature never exceeded 118*F even after an all day run at 60-65 mph in 85-95*F weather (yes a 66 can do that, despite its 1500 rpm redline). Has anyone done the research to determine what oil temps are necessary, in Spinneyhill's case, to "release" the viscosity of his 5W-40 to the equivalent of straight SAE 30 or SAE 40?
    2 points
  26. That picture could be on the cover of a magazine.
    2 points
  27. Looking good Chris, keep it up ! Steve
    2 points
  28. Without his Bertillon measurements, I guess we'll never know. 😉
    2 points
  29. Fleek... I call it a Model A.. because to the uneducated, uninitiated, common person on the street (public), they do not know the difference... they all love it, and the only people who question it or criticize it, are people who know their vintage vehicles .... like you You know the public love that old vintage vehicle look, and love to see them on the road... It has won 'peoples choice' at more than one car show... so that must mean that most people are either ignorant, uninformed or have very poor quality taste..... almost everyone who has seen it, Loves it..... lots of thumbs up and bi
    2 points
  30. It's great that your family has kept that car for so long. As JamesR said, it is very difficult to hand down cars from one generation to the next. Following generations tend to not treasure a vehicle like previous ones did. I am the only grandchild that could have taken my grandfather's Pierce when I did and maintained it and loved it like I have. I am hoping the next generation will be careful caretakers of both the Pierce Arrow and the Rickenbacker.
    2 points
  31. A honeycomb clogs pretty easily and is not that easy to clean out via its design. I guess you could try the evapo-rust stuff first and see if you can improve upon it even prior to taking it to a radiator shop. That being said, you did such a nice job on the car, I would be tempted to have a new core made by Brassworks. And, not sure about what you have for a thermostat, but make sure that is working properly. Also, make sure you do not have a hose collapsing from water pump suction (it will only collapse at speed/under load - aka generally not in the garage while looking at it). Does it ha
    2 points
  32. Sorry to hear that Ted..... I hope it all works out for you. Steve
    2 points
  33. Got the head back on a couple days ago. Ended up installing 13 Time Serts into the block. I only left 11 bores untouched. The ten holes along the manifold side were in very good shape. I assume the motor being hotter in that area possibly prevented the block from rusting as much as other parts even though all are in the water jacket. The opposite side has only 6 so the torque load is also spread a greater range on the off side of the manifold. The motor is 87-88 years old and who knows how many valve jobs were done on it and how many times the head had been on and off. Simple metal fatigue, we
    2 points
  34. It will be relisted due to non-paying bidder. That was not a realistic bid, someone was playing around. My guess is that the seller had two buddies he asked to bid on it to drive up the price but they weren't told about each other and were pushing numbers up without knowing they were working against each other.
    2 points
  35. Got notified this morning that the Sherwin Williams calendar for 2020 is already set for printing so my 32' Olds will be going into the 2021 calendar instead. Pretty cool.
    2 points
  36. With paint that shiny and nice, it will be VERY difficult to get no reflections of unwanted items. I vote for #2 and #5.
    1 point
  37. Maybe the guys with big money. 100 G and over to spend on cars, just want to buy done cars as they have all been burned out on projects, often probably buying something that looks good, only to find out it all needs to be done over to be up to their snuff.
    1 point
  38. Try Best Offer Counts in Sellersville, Pa. He has a web site also. I just got some parts for my 64 from him.
    1 point
  39. I use Valvoline VR-1 racing oil in my 1961 Mercury engine. High zinc levels #1 Selling Racing Motor Oil Specifically formulated for race-level protection in all classic and modern high-performance vehicles, including flat-tappet and performance cam engines High zinc and phosphorus formula for extreme anti-wear protection Formulated to maximize horsepower
    1 point
  40. Catholic converters? Does the Pope know about this? 😀. Maybe catalytic converters is what you mean. Some people use Diesel engine oil for that reason, the other oil that had higher zinc was motorcycle oil but now most new motorcycles have catalytic converters so the zinc level in the oil might have been reduced.
    1 point
  41. Hello Luv2Wrench, thanks for your comment. I must admit I would not do this again... How we made the radiator for our Cleveland. A few years ago, I asked a professional radiator company, what the radiator for the Cleveland would cost me, I gave him all the dimensions. Including all the tooling he had to make, a rough estimate: it would cost me $ 7.500,- , but that could be more if he got my order, then he would make a more precise calculation of the cost. I thought this was a bit steep, and that it would not go well with Anna (also not with me). And right I was…. So I decid
    1 point
  42. Since everyone is putting up photos of their favorite Buick or Buicks in a Fall setting, I thought it would be nice to show off the Model 48 in a photo that was taken a few years ago in one of the most beautiful old residential settings in our town. This was taken the day before Halloween and it was cool to say the least. We even had the floorboard mounted exhaust heater in operation and it worked just great. There is just something about an old Buick on a beautiful late Fall afternoon. It just doesn't get any better than that. Terry Wiegand Doo Dah America
    1 point
  43. Thanks Dennis Lets see some pics of that beauty of yours... Before things go too much further on my engine, I plan to go back over the items that still need painting. I'd like to get it looking like it did when it rolled off the factory floor. I know several of the bolts need to be the same color as the engine, as do the water jacket plugs, gasket edges, etc. I also need to get the oil filter painted a warm silver (I'm learning as much as I can from Mr Jenkins, and from all of you guys that have been through all of this already, thanks for the support!!!)
    1 point
  44. Here are a few shots showing progress on the body. It seemed to take forever to get to this point, but its starting to take shape again!
    1 point
  45. Once the paint & bondo start to come off, old sins are revealed. The wheel wells are an example. As you can see in the before shot, very little metal held the fenders in place (left.) The rust was cut out and new steel was welded into place for a permanent fix (right.) The fenders had to be regularly checked for fit.
    1 point
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