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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/11/2019 in all areas

  1. Larry, quit drooling on the spam
    5 points
  2. Reporting live from the world's largest golf cart and handicapped scooter exposition, flea market and antique car show. Warm. Cloudless skies and a slight breeze. More of the same expected for tomorrow.
    5 points
  3. With the weekend just around the corner I've been prepping to try and get some work done. I have mounted the front fender to my workbench to get higher up in the air so I can easily access the under side while bumping out the imperfections. Overall the fender is in great shape but it does have some small dings. I could fill these but I think probably easier to get the metal as straight as possible and just use a couple coats of sanding primer to fine tune.
    5 points
  4. Maine Forest & Logging Museum October 5th 2019
    3 points
  5. Is your jackstand appropriately positioned and of good quality? I'd think twice about working under that car.
    3 points
  6. See all you hooligans shortly. Yesterday we drove up and Saturday in Class 27H I will have this "That's not a Buick" going for a first Junior. I was supposed to drive it up, but the water pump failed Friday and could get a new one until Tuesday, so borrowed truck and trailer from a local BCA member to be sure I made it. This is my first car I bought when I was 16 and never sold. This is it's debut after a 3 year extensive restoration. And can I just say a restoration is SO much easier when you can buy the whole damn car piece by piece out of a catalog.
    3 points
  7. One last drive before winter with my friend Sue.
    2 points
  8. Great year at Hershey this year. Fantastic weather, good friends, and several new friends. Met several forum members in person , Matt and Melanie Harwood & Restorer32 Jeff of PennDutch Restorations were just a few that I was able to put a face to a name. As for finds.........fantastic year landing what I needed. High on my list were wiper motors for a big custom CCCA classic open car........and found four of them at a fair price, and three more at higher than I wanted to pay. Also a bunch of rare Stromberg carbs, and lots of other odds and ends. Overall a great time......as usual! 👍
    2 points
  9. I am looking forward to reading your posts again. I am surprised how good the fender is - 'Wot no rust'!
    2 points
  10. That’s funny Mike! 😂 I am on the downward stretch for sure. I have been fortunate that many people here, and in other parts of my life, have gone out of their way to help me. It really restores one’s faith in mankind. Perhaps many people can relate because of their own experiences, or consider that if their relative had been in my situation, they would appreciate someone helping them. Or perhaps people simply can’t believe the story I’ve shared. I have driven cluelessly through Colorado with storms and tornados on both sides, but my path ahead was sunny. I’ve driven towards terrifying lightning storms that suddenly stopped straight ahead of my path as I approached, but were on both sides. People with specific skills that I needed appeared in my life at just the right time, and cars sold when I needed money for dad. My new job that is 100% commission in a new industry for me, (loan officer for reverse mortgages), is going much better than expected and is very rewarding. I can not count all the miracles I’ve seen in the last 5 years, but I am very grateful for each one of them. There has certainly been a guiding spirit that has helped me through this. I’d have never guessed that I’d have accomplished what I have. All the credit goes to the many helpful people that I’ve encountered along the way, and of course someone upstairs who made sure that they crossed my path.
    2 points
  11. Not a beer guy Sean. Just everyone's designated driver😉. My patience, so far, has been holding up well throughout this process. During the times where I may become stagnant in the process, I will just sit and admire the car and all of the craftmanship of how the car was put together. I suppose the only thing that tries my patience is not having enough time in a day to do more work.
    2 points
  12. We will be on the show field Saturday with our warwick blue 69 GTO Judge.
    2 points
  13. "Lifted in the air"...maybe that is where I went wrong. I drive the car over my service pit and stand at each wheel. I gave away my Mityvac before I destroyed it with a hammer. But I have developed a method that is just as easy and no spills to attack painted parts. Write your request for this info on a $50 bill.
    2 points
  14. All done. It took much of the day because they had to be done one at the time but it was worth the effort. It's starting to look like an engine. Oh, and the material for the dividing head project finally arrived so tomorrow I'll be back on that. I'm actually grateful it took so long because otherwise I wouldn't have gotten to the priming cups.
    2 points
  15. November 30, 2009 Not yet finished… ...and already something to repair? The hub from the front brake rotor is 0.1mm too large for the hole at the wheel center. It can happen when there is not enough precision! I had to remove the caliper to modify the rotor. For practical reasons, I could not enlarge the wheel’s center hole. Now, I have to do the same at the other side! December 01, 2009 The first wheel is ready. I had to modify the inside diameter because there was an interference with the caliper. I just have to finish the 4 other wheels, fabricate the wheelcovers and the tires!
    2 points
  16. Wow... you are getting very good very fast! It is really pretty astonishing how fast problems vanish when you get accustomed to just making what you need. jp
    2 points
  17. It's funny that this topic comes up now as I have a couple deals pending for a one owner 63 Lesabre convertible ( rose mist poly ) and a one owner 1970'Toronado ( regency rose). Not sure either will come to fruition as owners are pretty proud of them. Personally I love the color girlish or not ! I do favor the white top on both rather than black but that 70 Riviera but it is a very striking car . KReed ROA 14549
    2 points
  18. In my previous post, I mentioned failing at my first attempt to remove the engine with transmission. In this post, I will go into more detail of what happened and what I did to correct it. Last Friday was my first attempt and my 2 youngest had asked me several times about helping me with removing the engine. Here's the first video... Not to worry everyone. I only let my 2 youngest do the initial hoisting of the engine until the front end came off of the front engine mounts. Once that was done, I took over the rest. Here's the 2nd video... Shortly after removing the exhaust cross-over pipe and after a few subtle attempts to pull the driveshaft from the transmission, I realized that I was doing something wrong and that I shouldn't force the issue. That's when I texted Matt and asked for his advice. Pulling backwards on the rear end would be the way to go using jacking straps. At this point, it was getting a little late and I had other responsibilities to take care of. So, I rested the engine in place and called it a day. The next day at about noon, I am back at it trying to figure out if anything would restrict me from pulling the rear end backwards. The only thing I saw that might restrict this was a rear diagonal round bar shown here...I removed this by unbolting 4 bolts, 1 nut and a bracket, all shown here...On the other side, I removed this nut...and then removed 2 bolts and bracket shown here.Tap the threaded shaft out on this end. This side is now free. Go back to passenger's side and pull off of the threaded shaft. Showing area of removal here...and then here...Showing the rear suspension cross bar removed from car.Overall, easy task. Now, time to pull the rear end. I didn't have any jacking straps, but my kind neighbor let me borrow his. Here is a video of what I did... The jacking straps worked like a charm and the torque tube slid out of the torque ball very easily as shown...Once it was totally separated, I reinstalled the rear suspension diagonal bar and then I get back to removing the engine/transmission. The only other foul that popped up was the oil filter housing. I removed it from the engine and I was now in the clear. Here's the last video that I took... At this point it's dark and getting late. So, I left the engine outside over night while it sit covered in plastic and on a couple of 4 x 4's. On Sunday, I cleared an area in the garage in front of my work bench and moved it in there. Here's a couple shots after all of the work...Overall, this task was a moderate and timely one when doing it by yourself. But it is very doable!
    2 points
  19. Area code 912 is a US telephone area code serving the southeastern portion of the state of Georgia.
    1 point
  20. Sorry, but the dragging can, chains, or steel pipe on each cart is the most annoying thing at Hershey. Yes, the drivers of these vehicles need to watch where they are going and NOT look at the wares in the swap spaces, but that's a different problem. When every motorized vehicle has a noismaker, you rapidly get to the point that you ignore them, which renders the annoying noise moot as far as a supposed "safety" feature. Sorry, but it is the responsibility of the driver of the vehicle to watch out for pedestrians, not the other way around.
    1 point
  21. The secret to Mighty-Vac success is to seal the bleeder screws so air does not get sucked in. I use (horror, GASP, HORROR, the world will end.....) PTFE tape! Just wrap at the "air" end, one wrap, leaving the first few threads next to the bleed hole IN THE wheel cylinder clear of tape. That way none of the shards of PTFE tape will make their way into the wheel cylinder/brake system, where, yes, things can go wrong..... Tape on threads, vacuum at end of bleeder, where are the tape shards going? Yes, into the Mighty-Vac or other vacuum source. Been using a Mighty-Vac to bleed brakes on all sorts of cars for 35 years. Everytime I get the "this isn't working right" feeling, I put tape on the bleed screw (see, I try it dry first!) and all is well. YMMV
    1 point
  22. Those 64 only, Wildcat only center caps are extremely rare. I challenge anyone to find a complete set in good condition. I'm saying that he could replicate the wheels using a later year wheel, painting the webs the same silver, and using a Riviera cap. Many a 64 Wildcat owner would pay handsomely for a genuine set of 64 Wildcat rally wheels with the correct cap. That center cap is stamped. It would require a lot to make a press that could reproduce it in a limited number.
    1 point
  23. George, I don't mean to get into an argument, but the Fel-Pro and Victor gaskets already have a coating that will seal the imperfections. Adding another sealer will defeat the purpose of the coating. Most head gasket failures are caused by incorrect procedures in preparation and installation.The block and the head should be surfaced when the head gasket is replaced. Most blocks and heads from the early years have enough meat to facilitate this. The copper spray does not give a thick enough coating to seal any large imperfections and small imperfections should be handled by a good gasket. The threads on the fasteners must be clean and lubricated according to the engine manufacturer's specifications. The torque wrench should be checked for accuracy and the fasteners tightened in stages. I believe that asbestos gaskets were last made in the 1970's and I would not trust them on my cars.
    1 point
  24. Sleeve job as it came back from Brake and Equipment:
    1 point
  25. The specification is the inside length, the outside width, depth and the angle of the sides. If you have an old one, measure it, even take it with you. Dunlop Fan Belt and Radiator Hose Recommendation Catalogue about 1946 show 1935 Stude Dictator 6 with belt V60, same as 1934, of 46-9/16 x 53/64 x 17/32 -- 42o. Also fitted to Buicks, Chryslers, Citroen, De Soto, Dodge, Essex, Fargo, Hudson, International, Massey Harris, Plymouth, Rockne, Terraplane, Twin City of various years. "Automotive Interchangeability" by the Automotive Publishing Co., 1933-42, gives 4 "master fan belts". Studebaker 1933-35 Pres., Comm. and Dict. use belt 4 = "Plymouth 6 1933-42" and from Dunlop that is the V60!
    1 point
  26. I have not ever seen oversize cups in modern times. In any event, you should NOT hone that much. The bore is going to have issues. It just is. Don't try to make it new. Often the pits will not be where the seal normally moves. Even if they are, it is truly amazing how bad of a bore you can get away with and have things seal up just fine, as long as you don't go crazy with the hone, and the rubber is brand new! Use the hone to clean and deglaze the bore and knock down the rust. It doesn't take much. Do NOT try to remove the pits. Even little ones are way too deep. Just scrape down the high spots, wash the bore REALLY clean, assemble the cylinder with a little sil-glyde and call it a day. Resleeving is readily available these days if you need it. It isn't even that expensive, and then you have a brand new bore.
    1 point
  27. The correct ones are the flat back ones. I will get you pictures of them tomorrow - for lack of a better description they look like large cooking pots.
    1 point
  28. None of the discussion bothers me! Inside quarters/armrests are a big problem, and I've cobbled together some assemblies, as you cannot duplicate the heavy formed compound curves with any material I've found. There are Fiberglas repros available for some Packards, I understand. I start with a shaped piece of plywood for the armrest, and work from there. The compound curve over a wheel well from armrest to door can be duplicated by attaching a layer of muslin over the ever present bracing, padding, and installing fabric on that, with no board backing. As to door panels, using a waterproof panel board and putting a plastic backing on it is good practice. I've never seen an original door panel, pre-WW2, that came from the factory like that, though. The factory just used water resistant board, and figured that would last long enough.
    1 point
  29. VL: You could post about how to boil water and very one would read about it. Looks like you may be winding up some loose ends I just wish I had your fortitude I just admire what you have been through.. God must be right there with you. Lots of love. Mike
    1 point
  30. Here are some additional photos as requested. PM me with your e-mail for the Dropbox link to see many more.
    1 point
  31. Again the internal threading went well. . . . . and the 5C collet threaded into the end.
    1 point
  32. After cutting the thread I bored the centre out and reduced the diameter of the end to fit into the seamless hollow tube - if it ever arrives! Still boring! That should do. I won't part the threaded part off until the tube is here. I knew there was another reason for not parting it off - I needed the threaded portion to have a 'handle so I could use it to check the thread when I cut it into the block that holds the thrust race. I forgot to take photos of cutting this internal thread. It all went better than I expected. . . . . Apart from the knurling which was a failure. I milled out four slots for the C-spanner. I had to do this by eye, as I did not have any means of holding the round material, other than in the machine vice. At first, I had tried clamping it onto a V-block on the milling table but it came loose and broke the milling cutter! The next job to do was making an end to braze into the hollow tube that will screw onto the thread on the 5C collets. I measured how long the thread had to be, added a bit and then cut a relief inside the tube about the depth of the thread.
    1 point
  33. Really enjoyed following your progress and restoration efforts! Now, Keep those pictures coming showing off this beautiful vehicle in all it's glory while you are enjoy it!
    1 point
  34. I ran the pump for two hours today with no leaks so I think I've probably solved that set of problems. UPS is still dithering with my piece of 12L14 - so I decided to tackle another job I had waiting in the wings. The priming cups. This engine uses right angle primers which are a lot less common than the straight ones and in as much as I've seen, frightfully expensive. I bought a set about three years ago - sight unseen on ebay while I was in England. When I got home I realized they were the wrong thread so I've been fishing about for a way to use them. I started to make little adapters...then realized that I could use the ones I already had if I counterbored them to 1/2". The first step was to make a tool to hold them. Its just a piece of 1" bar with a 1/8 NPT threaded hole but it allows me to hold the piece in a 1" collet. Then I counterbored them with a 1/2" end mill to a depth of 1/2". That was easy. The next step was trickier. I made a similar tool with a 1/4 NPT thread, stripped the lever and spring from the primer and screwed it in. I had to grind a tool to get into the space between the hex and the flare of the cup and set a stop on the lathe so I wouldn't move it back too far and hit the cup. Then turned the hex and the threaded part of the primer down to 1/2". When I had the diameter correct, I cut it off at 1/2" Much to my satisfaction it slipped right into the counterbore so I soldered it in place. Then reassembled the primer and tried it in the engine. I think this is about as neat a job as I've ever done. Now I just have to do three more.
    1 point
  35. Ted, we had no doubts in our minds. Thanks for a great ride. John ...
    1 point
  36. What color is your Wildcat? I recently was watching a white 66 convertible for sale in central Canada that was in GREAT shape. It seems to be almost too much of a hassle to have a Canadian car transported to the US though. :-( I love the turquoise 70!
    1 point
  37. Higher octane fuel burns more slowly than lower octane fuel. You will find the exhaust side of the engine gets quite a bit hotter - it is may even be still burning as it goes into the exhaust. You may even have valve trouble. Your car was made for, what, 53 octane? Or maybe 63 octane? Use the lowest octane you can find.
    1 point
  38. Attempted to clean the rims today. The paint isn't in so great shape, and they won't really clean up. With the numerous aftermarket (or stock) options, I don't know that I feel very strongly about making more investment in these tired steel rims. They're 2 different date codes - two with 1990, two with 1994 - so something happened along the way. The rim date codes are split diagonally (right front & left rear). The tire date codes are split front/year, 3 years apart. They'd put "tire blackening" goop on the tires, which was smeared all over the rims & along the fenders. Might just go the low-cost-enjoyment route & have the no-tread rear tires replaced & not think about improving the rims for a while. Space-saver spare has a hole in it, so I'll be replacing that. Repainted the wiper wing (or whatever it's called). Got the emissions done yesterday. I'll get the license plate this upcoming weekend. Full-time job & all that.
    1 point
  39. Our newly acquired 1955 Buick Roadmaster Convertible. Lovin it!
    1 point
  40. Greetings from another NA base model owner! Beautiful car! You did well. I really like the blue. 107k miles? It might take you a while to wear that out....
    1 point
  41. Afternoon Everyone, I just uploaded the entire 852 page 1964 Buick Chassis Service Manual to YouTube. It'll be on my website later on. If you view in 4K, you should be able to take easy, viewable, screenshots. https://www.youtube.com/embed/yWsUv0yZtqM
    1 point
  42. Welcome to the forum. Great looking Riv! If you have not already done so, please consider joining the ROA. Next years Annual Meet will be in Kalamazoo, MI. You have to be a ROA member to participate in the Meet car show. Check the details on www.rivowners.org.
    1 point
  43. I really enjoy seeing these kind of historical display posters and photos and am going to continue my search to try and make my research finding as accurate as possible - no guessing. Love those "FLASH" poster and hope to find as many as I can, along with photos, for my project. Thanks David.
    1 point
  44. Very cool info and great photo to show what the maps would have looked like displayed at the dealers. Each bit of information and each photo I see is a step closer in my research. Thanks Dave
    1 point
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