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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/17/2019 in all areas

  1. Installed the rubber running board onto the metal running board and installed the chrome strip along the edge. Started to fit the board to the drivers side and found the wood I replaced was just a little too thick and was hitting the top of the running board. I had to trim the wood with chisels to narrow the bottom edge enough to clear the board top. Cut and trimmed up a piece of welting and held it in place with double sided tape, then bolted the front of the board to the rear of the fender with six 1/4-20 bolts. I will have to pull the rubber board off later when I bolt the running board down to the two support irons. I’m waiting until I have the rear fenders in place before I drill the holes through the boards. Because my boards were restored with repopped bottoms, they have no mounting holes and I need to align everything up first before drilling holes.
    5 points
  2. Rewiring Old Sockets The new front harness I got from Rhode Island Wiring Service requires that I re-use two sockets from the old harness -- a six pin socket that connects the front harness to the rear harness, and a three pin socket that connects the turn signal wires from the front harness to the wires coming out of the steering column. Here's what the six pin connector looks like: To open up the connector, I had to very carefully pry up the little ears -- first with an Xacto and then a small screw driver. The connector then comes apart like this: Since I was a little intimidated by the soldering job (because I'm assuming finding replacements for these things would be very difficult), I decided to start with the three-pin one first. First I carefully desoldered the old wires and used some solder wick to soak up the old solder and clear the holes in the contacts. RI Wire provides very detailed and excellent instructions on how to hook everything up. Strip off a bit of insulation ... And resolder the wires according to the diagram. Slip everything back together and crimp back down the ears, and job's all done. Not as bad as I thought, and I'm ready for the six-pin job next.
    4 points
  3. I found this on YouTube. Enjoy the old cars.
    3 points
  4. Late teen's early 20's. Car facing camera might be a 1915 mid size Buick. They had a largish, light colored, square name badge like this car has. Also cowl and windshield look about right for a 1915 Buick. All the others look to be no newer than around 1922. Greg in Canada
    3 points
  5. We started the weekend early as Friday was Windsor's answer to the Woodward Dream Cruise by holding what promises to be the annual Cruise the River event down on the water front in front of Caesars Casino. Finishing work at 12:30 and a start time of 1 pm till 11 pm, I grabbed the Special, loaded chairs and snacks to join my friends and watch the cars roll in and out. We set up my tent between my friends cars as the sun was a bit warm even though there was a nice breeze. It was a perfect spot and kept the girls happy. I liked that Denise's hair went well with Deryl's Riviera. The event was free to all cars / trucks with the official cruise the river time to kick off at 6 which left lots of time to walk the parking lot and view many makes and models. This Velie is owned by Jim & Mary of Windsor. Jim found it out in western Canada, took it all apart as the wood while there needed replacing and has driven it all over! It is the only one in our part of the country and draws quite a crowd. Eventually this beautifully restored Wildcat came in parking beside the Special. It ran just like a nailhead should! After sharing a pizza with the group we had delivered, it was time to cruise. One of the interesting things was this stop at the Firestone lot where the Dari Delite Ice Cream place we went to last week had a trailer and was offering free ice cream and pop to anyone stopping. They said it was their way of giving back to the community for having supported them all these years. Nice! Staying to eat the soft ice cream lot's of cars took advantage and reminded me of American Graffiti when this '32 pulled in beside us. Half expected Harrison Ford to step out... We didn't do the full route through Windsor and headed back to enjoy the second live band performing. They were a Beatles tribute band of local talent and did a fair job entertaining us. People and cars came all evening but at about 10:30 it was time to head home. Beautiful day with low humidity and no rain! If we didn't have to make an appearance at a funeral viewing today it would be our plan to take in part of the Woodward Cruise on our way to Back to the Bricks in Flint... There is always next year (I hope). The trip odometer now reads this.
    3 points
  6. Hello keiser31, Here in Australia we are used to all sorts of oddities in motorcars of all ages. Remember it is 102 years old! Some-how I doubt if this one will find its way to my garage doors. I am waiting for some more photographs to appear in my in-box. Even then it would be a day's drive each way plus over night accomodation to go to look at it. Then if I did buy it, there is the problem of transporting all the loose parts home. I just like to keep my friends informed about some of my more interesting activities. I know I need another project in order to keep me alive and my brain ticking over. You may just have to put up with my ramblings for a little while. Bernie j (oldcar) a 1936 model with no chrome plated parts.
    3 points
  7. MAKING THE NUTS FOR THE BIG END PIN Well, I was enjoying myself until I started on the nuts! I found it very stressful. Maybe because there was a lot to think about, I was cutting into a blind hole, and it was the first time I had tried it on this big lathe. I managed it, tried the jig, that Joe had suggested to make first. That fitted OK, but seemed a bit loose. Perhaps I had machined off a 'tad' too much metal? I then tried the big end pin and that fitted the same, a bit 'wobblily'. I used the donkey saw to cut the internal threaded part of the hexagon bar. I worry about using a parting tool as I seem to break parting tools when I use them. I will have to look at a U-tube video to see if I am doing it the wrong way! I then split the threaded part into two using an angle grinder fitted in a 'cut off' stand. Being disappointed with my nut making I had another go. This time I cut off a section of the hex bar so I was not cutting a thread into a blind hole. Yet again I ended up with a wobblily nut! This is a photo of the thread I cut. It looks OK. I finished the day feeling rather dejected with my workmanship. Overnight I thought about it and decided that the nuts would really need to be good as they need tightening up very tight to stop the flywheels moving. In the morning I rang Tracy tools and asked them if they happened to have a 3/4" x 18 tpi tap in stock. They did, it was high speed steel, hence was a lot more expensive than a carbon steel tap. After a bit of moaning about the price the guy on the other end of the phone said I could have it at a good discount as it was 'old stock'. It should arrive on Saturday. The next morning I thought I would do something different and try and get my head around measuring the conrods. I had a clear up before I started, I saw the big end pin and thought I would try the original nuts on it. Guess what, they had a wobble as well! That made me feel a lot better. When the tap arrives I can try that and see if that gives less wobble than my efforts.
    3 points
  8. Dwight, You do not straighten push rods. You replace them. Someone will have one for you. You just need to do some looking and have some patience. So by that I also mean that you do not want to install a new push rod and then bend it. Here is some more food for thought. Remove the bad push rod. Take a rubber mallet before you turn the engine again and ensure that each valve spring moves (some) when you hit it. Turn the engine say 15 degrees. Tap all the springs again. We want to make sure all the valves move before we do any crank rotating. Before I forget, make sure the water pump is not frozen to the shaft also before rotating the engine or damage will result to the camshaft gear. Once you can make a complete rotation, then you can measure one of the valves springs, and see how far the spring needs to be compressed in normal operation. You can make a lever arm to push on the stuck valve once it is free and ensure that it will move the amount it needs to move. Only push on the area above the valve stem. Once the amount of movement is verified, then you can replace the rod. I will also weigh in that the safest thing is to just pull all the valves out, clean out all the carbon and old oil, Ensure all parts have assembly lube in them. Not a bad time to dress the valve seats and faces. Hugh
    3 points
  9. Again that is NEVER the point of doing a restoration. Jeez can we get over that! Restoring anything, a car, a house, whatever - or to put it another way - to be a woodworker and make a piece of furniture or as my wife does - to restore a piece of furniture - is about the art of the process and the satisfaction of the process in the end result. I am so tired of the "you will never get your money out of that car" criticism. I have 2 Reattas I am restoring neither are "worth" a dime. I overpaid to read their for sale ads for crying out loud. STOP the comments about value. Restore the V16 and when you are half way through look down and contemplate who bought the car originally and just the sheer awesomeness of the car. No - hot rodders have little interest in this faction of the hobby.
    3 points
  10. Stephen Barner, Ok, I have now received some Model Legislation from the Special Equipment Market Association (SEMA), for your assistance. I have sent it to you via AACA private message. This model legislation was originally intended for assisting state-level legislature deal with issues like inoperable vehicles, while preserving the rights of car collectors to pursue their hobbies. I hope it will provide you with the assistance that you need. Thanks for caring about people who like old cars!
    3 points
  11. A bit off topic, but Buick related, a little while ago I questioned this tube running alongside the generator in this '58 Buick While browsing my parts manual from 1960 I ran across this image of the '58 Buick A/C installation. So while the tube employed in the blue car seems to be aftermarket, it also seems to be an attempt to re-create what the factory would have installed. Further, the next page of the manual showed an alternative '58 system called a "cool pack" This does not employ the tube. And having never heard of this system, but wondering about the open fan cage, a few pages later I found this reference which appears to be a hang under the dash unit. My parts manual did not show anything like this for another year up to 1960, but there it is if anyone needs proof that this is a factory unit. I now return you to the subject of this topic.
    3 points
  12. There is a very snazzy fleet wood bodied S that was restored by Steve Babinsky. I don’t have any pictures yet. There is a neat 200 roadster which I also need pictures of.
    3 points
  13. When I'm tinkering in the garage I like to listen to some of Yoko Ono's primal scream therapy tapes.
    3 points
  14. Now I know why we are doomed as a country. I realize every older person typically thinks this of the younger ie millennial generation, but its becoming a reality. So I put my 77 Pace car up for auction and have a reserve on it. Bids have gotten pretty close so I decide to let it roll and lift the reserve to get it sold. Go to my listing and it wont allow me to update it and remove the reserve. After numerous maddening attempts, I cave and call support. Get ahold of a younger guy on the west coast, explain the issue and I can tell he thinks Im a moron cause any dope can do this. He walks me thru what Ive already done and triumphantly says its fixed... until I click on the ad and tell him no, it still has the reserve. Jack around with this another 20 min and he says, oh I see the problem. You have bidders so you cant change it. Now I walk him thru the posted ebay rules, you know, the ones these people are specialized in. Clearly states reserves can be removed if A: the bids do not reach the reserve! No kidding!. and B: if its not less than 12 hrs in the auction. So I point out both these criteria have been met as there is almost 2 days left. Huh. So then the story is ebay motors is an extra special section of the ebay family and I should call them tomorrow to discuss this problem as this is WAY above his paygrade. Although, his really good advise to me is I should have saved the extra money I had to fork out to get a reserve and just have started the auction at that amount. Brilliant! I told him I assumed he had never been to an actual auction before as reserves are meant to protect a seller but can and are lifted if the seller decides to take a lesser amount. Silence on the other end. I was thinking this was hitting him like Edison and the phonograph but came back to reality when he said " but if you start it at the higher price, you can avoid all this". Spinal Tap came to mind as these go to eleven. I ask to move up the food chain and get ahold of Mensa #2. Spend another 20 min explaining this and this guy finds an ebay motor rep still around to fix the problem. This young lady is very well spoken and seems to grasp the situation. Now were cookin with gas! After several hold I need to consult moments, she comes back and says I didnt scroll down far enough in the rules. There it states ebay motors allows you to remove a reserve with LESS than 12 hrs on a sale. This she states is clear evidence why it is not working and I should wait until the last 12 hrs when bidders may or may not be paying attention to cancel the reserve. I ask her to reread what she just pointed out and she does. And she presses her point. Thats when I say, "but if you read it in English, it states you CAN change it. Not specifically with less than 12 hrs to go only. Thats why I am wanting to change it now, while bidders have a chance to mull over a higher bid." Silence on the other end. But these go to eleven. So how this online behemoth is still in operation with the newest crop of savvy college educated go getters is beyond me. Now that Ive wasted a solid 90 min, I feel much better.
    2 points
  15. I have always experienced that no photos equals no interest. How do we even know if we ARE interested if we can't get an idea of what you have? They could be rusty parts cars for all we know.
    2 points
  16. At least they didn't mistake it for "orgasm" "Well, a friend of mine named Steve Goodman wrote that song And he told me it was the perfect country & western song I wrote him back a letter and I told him it was not the perfect country & western song Because he hadn't said anything at all about mama Or trains, or trucks, or prison, or getting' drunk Well, he sat down and wrote another verse to the song and he sent it to me And after reading it I realized that my friend had written the perfect country & western song And I felt obliged to include it on this album The last verse goes like this here Well, I was drunk the day my mom got out of prison And I went to pick her up in the rain But before I could get to the station in my pickup truck She got run over by a damned old train" You Never Even Called Me By My Name - David Allan Coe
    2 points
  17. Regardless of the stormy weather forecast I dove into the rear brakes today. Since I am not fond of squeezing between the car and the little bit of space around it in the garage, I put a pop-up in the driveway and pulled under it for some protection. Man this car is lonnngggg! Anyway, jacked er up and removed the pass side tire and then struggled with the drum. Just would not come off, so I poked around the backing plate for the adjuster hole to find none. What? I was completely surprised to discover the plug for the adjuster hole had never been removed. I figured this spelled trouble for the brake drums, which are so clean you can still read the part numbers without any wire brushing. So, I popped out the one adjuster plug hole and backed off the adjuster a number of turns. And when I got the drum off I found this! Sweet biscuits. Those shoes look brand new! No point in changing them, unless the other side needs to be replaced. But the plan was to do one brakes and shock absorber on one side at a time. Enter plan "B". removed the tire and that drum just pulled off with out a problem and I found this: So I held up a new shoe to one of these and the material seemed to be very close in thickness. Measuring each rivet hole I found the bottoms of the drivers side a little thinner but the rest of the thickness were identical at: And both brake drums are smooth finish with no gouges. I cannot believe these are the original brakes. The car has 107K on it now. Must have been a very competent person who put these brakes on to do so without the use of the adjuster hole. So, the new shoes are going onto the parts shelf for this car. Since I did remove the adjuster plug on the pass side I also removed the one on the drivers side. Then I slipped the drums back on and tackled the shocks. At this point it was starting to cloud up and I thought I heard a little thunder so I did not stop to take pictures. The bottom bolts came off with the strong tug I expected. The tops are, of course, bolts and nuts. Naturally the side with the exhaust was very tight. After numerous tries I had to squeeze my arm between the exhaust pipe and the gas tank and then lay on my side to reach the bolts on the top side of the frame. I was concerned about how I would get the nuts started again with the new shocks, but the fasteners separated without much ado. I was pleasantly surprised to find that starting the fasteners was no problem at all, and they both started the first shot and tightened up easily. Then I did the drivers side which was super easy as there was a lot of space without an exhaust pipe there. So that is done. Didn't get a test ride as I just put everything away before the sky drew dark and the thunder was unmistakable. Thing is, it never did rain. But I'll take it to church tomorrow, and then go see if this resolved the slight vibration I had at 60 MPH.
    2 points
  18. I've found some ways to search. but it's time consuming. My problem is like some of you I have a wide interest range in old cars so I like to cast a wide net, but really hate looking at the same old overpriced rust buckets and aborted rat rod projects that seem to be the bulk of what's listed. With Craigslist charging though I have found they chased off a lot of sellers that seem to have moved to Facebook.
    2 points
  19. Thanks for the tips all! After reviewing the shop manual, my money is on the vacuum advance. I think the ignition & centrifugal advance are probably fine given that the condition does not occur at high rpm in neutral, only while under load. Now I just have to figure out how to diagnose and fix it! I received the car with electronic ignition installed, but I think I have the OEM in a box of spares. It looks like the plug wires are old, but no shorts, so I will probably just replace them and the plugs as a maintenance item if nothing else.
    2 points
  20. They don't want you to search. They want you to spend all day looking at it.
    2 points
  21. No posts in a while. Took some time off to do a 1-week tour of some cool stuff in the mid-west. Also been working overtime and have had almost zero time, as usual nowadays. Finally got another weekend at home to work on the MGA. I've been grinding the welds on the driver's side rocker with some success. Will need to fill in some pin holes, but making slow progress. should be able to do more this weekend. Since I don't have enough time after work to do much, I've been slowly working on the seats and more side projects., as they take minimal time to process. I almost have the seat frames and hardware all finished, but yesterday and today, hit a snag due to 150% humidity. Here's what I have so far (Photo 1). I'll be able to reuse the original rubberized horse hair padding with both seats. The seat lowers will need all upholstery items, but the frames and hardware are all salvageable. Should be buying new foam and leather upholstery in mid-Sep, as Moss is having a 15% off sale for over $1,500 spent. Next side project are the 4 instrument cluster support brackets. Pretty easy. Stripped some metal and tried to prep it with rust inhibitor, but it just flash rusted after treatment almost immediately (Photo 2). Luckily, no big deal, just need to strip it down quickly and try again when humidity is lower. Putting off blasting and stripping of the rest of the seat frame parts due to humidity. Will probably focus on more welding. I've decided to get all 4 fenders into a blasting company, then prime them up before the winter. My blaster is too slow and clogs too quickly for me to strip both sides of even one fender, so will have to farm this out. Spreading it out will allow flash rust to form and I usually don't have multiple days to do it at once, so will have to pay up to get it all done at once.
    2 points
  22. Took part in the Cruise the River event Friday taking my wife and friend for an Ice Cream stop along the route.
    2 points
  23. Don't get too interested in other people's opinions. Look at everything else in another person's life and see if you can handle other decisions of theirs as well. You've done fine so far - believe in yourself.
    2 points
  24. Really nice work, Neil. That kind of stuff isn't my strong suit and I feel intimidated every time I have to grab a soldering iron. You're doing a great job!
    2 points
  25. Please explain WHY you think the price is right? Because "you can't restore one for that price?" is no longer a valid argument. There was a very nice 1938 Cadillac 60 Special on the Cadillac LaSalle Club forum offered for $8900 that sold for less than that price. This is a market correction. Thankfully and finally. Obviously I am an anti-greed person. If I have one of these, and I spent an honest $15,000 to buy it, I am not going to ask $25K for it, which is what this seller is essentially doing. We can haggle over what he did pay, meh, I might be $2000 off +/- but the bottom line is the culture that we always make money on old cars, is hopefully, coming to an end. Enjoy the cars, sell them for market value. Please.
    2 points
  26. The 820s are much, much too big. They are trying to make radials that look like bias-ply tires, and that's commendable and I think in many cases they've been successful. My initial recommendation for Earl's car was the 700R15 that Diamondback sold based on a Yokohama carcass, but if I recall correctly those were not available at the time Earl was shopping for tires. Diamondback was also still in limbo on their "Auburn" radial, which is apparently now available in limited release. Shortly before Earl, I was going though this exact same situation with my 1941 Cadillac 60S which wears exactly the same size tires as his Roadmaster on exactly the same size wheels. I ultimately chose the 760R15 Coker radials which were just about ideal. They were larger than the recommended 700R15 but in comparison to the original 7.00-15 bias-ply, they were much closer overall. Whatever the numbers were that led to the 820R15, they weren't right. Looking at just the height or just the tread width or whatever wasn't enough. Here's the Cadillac after it was fitted with the Coker 760R15 radials: I thought they looked pretty correct and they did ride and handle beautifully with reasonable steering effort. I hate to admit that I loved those Coker tires, but they looked great and worked well. I sold the car shortly thereafter so I can't comment on longevity, noise, or resistance to whitewall staining. Everyone knows I prefer Diamondback, but since they couldn't sell me anything to fit this car, I went with Coker and was satisfied. Now that Diamondback offers their Auburn radial in sizes that should fit, I would probably start there and see which one looked right. If I was unsure of sizing I might buy one and try it out before buying a set or I would trust them--they seem to know sizes a bit better. Comparing the numbers doesn't always tell you the whole story. I looked at these Cokers for a long time before deciding on the 760R15 even though it seemed wrong on paper. I'm glad I chose that size because the 700R15 would have been too small. I suspect that Coker is cheating a bit with the sizing (undersized) to make them applicable to more cars and the 760s were closer to the right size than the 700s that were "supposed" to be correct. Does this help?
    2 points
  27. The front plate assembled. I then started on the water inlet hub. I used my 20TPI to thread it. 1-3/4-20 isn't a real size but these parts aren't intended to ever come apart. This is just a way of getting around making a complicated casting. I faced and bored the inlet side plate to 2.70 - the size for the thread. It was a little fussy fitting and, in the end, I had to lap it slightly to eliminate some burrs but it went together OK. The inlet side getting faced to 1/2" thick. Both plates with their hubs... The small hub was quite a bit too long. I must have remembered one of the dimensions incorrectly so I cut that one down to 1". I also discovered that the roller thrust bearings I intend to use were, in fact, available at the time but weren't used much because they were very expensive. While making one of these isn't the work of a day or two, the second one is going much faster and, so far at least, coming out better.
    2 points
  28. After the wife and I fought for two hours to get the four wires in the metal loom last night, with success, the wiring harness is now going in!
    2 points
  29. As far as the quality of the film , it was probably restored and digitized. Our library is able to take period films and put them in digital format and they look great. I am sure the film is authentic.
    2 points
  30. Well, then when do you think it was? 1912? There are far too many details in that short film for it to be anything but from the period... do you think someone made a fake New York City and hired hundreds of actors - not to mention things like the steam tugs and horse drawn conveyances – in order to shoot a 5 minute black & white video? Look up the recent British film "They Shall Not Grow Old"... 100% original footage of WWI from the Imperial War Museum. It is simply astonishing how the speed and lighting was corrected.
    2 points
  31. There was some uncertainty among some members weather or not the engine turning was a decal or not. 1940 Service Presentation makes it pretty clear: Unfortunately most of the engine turning on my panels has been buffed out. I wish there was a decal replacement because as much as I'd love to have the turning done again it'd would be right out of my budget.
    1 point
  32. I think we have pretty well pinned the timeframes down despite the lack of date, but I agree it would be nice to know for sure. Dad continues to have a bit of a rebound. No telling how long it will last, but I’m enjoying the visits while he’s doing better. I know he may not be with us much longer. I believe he had an infection, followed by a stroke. They don’t know for sure and they don’t really have a specific cause for him becoming ill, but he did suffer a fall before he became sick a few months ago. It’s an emotional rollercoaster at times, made more difficult since I’m the only family member involved. My new job is going very well and I can work from home, so that is making life much easier than when I was working a much more demanding job 5 hours away from him. Plus I’m helping Seniors have a more secure retirement, and it’s really gratifying to see the relief it brings them. My former realtor and lender clients have been referring a good stream of people for me to share the program information with. I’m glad I moved back to be closer with him. Thank you for asking. Thank you very much for the prayers and support for him! Here’s a pic I took on his birthday, the 11th of August.
    1 point
  33. VL2. Love the picture isn't it a shame nobody put a date on the back side. By the way how is your dad doing. Keeping him my prayers. Mike
    1 point
  34. I will be following along Randy! I also get frustrated with the marketplace search on FB, however I have found some really good stuff listed if I have a bit of patience. I just missed a 58 Star Chief a couple of days ago. The guy was making the deal with another gentleman as I was messaging with him. It was a great deal, most of the "bull" work was done & the price he was asking was less than he had invested in chroming, plating & polishing of all the brightwork! God Bless Bill https://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/threads/nationwide-single-car-transport-hauling-open-or-enclosed.614419/
    1 point
  35. If you are intent on doing this read (and understand) this first. Just don't use the original master cylinder like Scarebird says you can do. Any "universal" kit will require more modifications like changing the fulcrum/pedal ratio. I can help you get the stock system working better than the conversion (but you did not ask for that).
    1 point
  36. I see little chance of owning (or even recieving on offer on) any car that is advertised at triple it's true, current value.
    1 point
  37. Looks like there is plenty of rubber for the road. Vintage "run-flats."
    1 point
  38. Well I'll Be. I've been living in the PNW most of my life and didn't even know it.
    1 point
  39. I agree with Y-jobfan. Lets not say goodbye, see ya later!
    1 point
  40. How did those people survive? There was not one warning sign not to cross in front of traffic, no guard rails protecting people from trains, not even a stop sign to guide traffic! Oh, wait a minute, there was common sense, something that is lacking today.
    1 point
  41. On any pre war car, I have always thought that radial tires were a solution to a problem that doesn’t exist. While the idea can be appealing, it creates more potential problems than it theoretically solves. Generally speaking, keeping a car “bone stock” is a good idea. Engineering was better than most people realize by 1925.
    1 point
  42. If you inflate a radial to 40-45 psi it will feel like a bias tire.
    1 point
  43. I miss the old days when someone bought your car on ebay and backed out of the deal. At least they had to courtesy to call you up and lie to your face. Kids playing with the computer was always a good one. Don't forget mad ex wives and or girlfriends who still had the ebay password. Then there was always the I didn't see the other zero excuse.
    1 point
  44. More pics from Kingston, Ontario The fantastic 1929 McLaughlin Buick Roadster is owned and driven by Bill and Marlene McLaughlin of Toronto. Laurence Bell of Oshawa, Ontario brought the 1929 Model 47 sedan. and I still have a shot of Larry & Joyce Schramm with their 1913 , but cannot yet upload it - well maybe tomorrow?
    1 point
  45. AACA has not shared any info except with a Nationwide discount program that has been running several years. I get these everyday from Amazon, Ebay, etc that come to me via text and usually say I won something or have a gift. I delete immediately. There is NO such program going on with AACA and no survey's being done at the present time although we may do on in the future. Our members will be well informed prior to that for sure. This is the first of this one I have heard so if anyone else gets it please forward it to me so i can give to our IT people. Thanks and sorry no $55.00!!!
    1 point
  46. Take out the A Pilars if you are concerned about scuffing the side edges of the dashpad. A J clip fits in between the dash cover on the bottom lip metal on the dash pad frame. The J clip had threads in it. Bill showed a screw, probably a number 8. I think and I’m happy to be mistaken but the stock screw has a black rubber washer the fits neatly under the head of the screw. I’ve taken my dash pad out and recovered it and put it back. Turbinator.
    1 point
  47. Tery Those are super as well! That last one is Mercedes I think WOW ... I want to tow my rig with the Franklin service car. Im working on the chrome rails for the top of the box as we speak.
    1 point
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