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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/10/2019 in all areas

  1. JBuick, Thank you. I am still working my way toward being able to show the car. At least now I no longer have to push it. 1924 was a step change at Buick. Raising the height of the radiator in the model change and adding front brakes. I just finished pinstriping the car yesterday. My pinstripe procedure is below. I posted my wheel pinstriping procedure earlier. I also have my replated bumpers on the car. My headlight reflectors have been sent off. I was hoping to get a photo outside, but the garage door spring broke so the car stays inside until later in the week. Hugh
    5 points
  2. 5 points
  3. Kings of the Road museum I have visited the Kings of the Road museum a couple of times in the late 1950s. The only two cars that I actually remember is a 1910 Cadillac Town Car and a mid ‘30s Packard sedan. The Cadillac really locked on to me, it was so tall you could almost stand up in it and walk around. The Packard had an electrical circuit board on front of the firewall on the drivers side which had fuses and switches that played a variety of tunes thru different horns. I saw this Packard at a car show, in operating condition about 35 years ago. Sometime in early 1960 my friend Dave and I (both avid old car nuts, both 18 years old) were told that the museum had closed down and a lot of old stuff was being thrown away. We went to the museum in my mom’s ‘47 Studebaker Champion and sure enough the place was closed. We walked around the building and found the back door was not locked. Went inside and nothing was there except for a few posters on the wall. There was a dusty, dirty, dim, room near the rear of the building that had piles of dirty, dried out old cardboard boxes and Black Widow spiders everywhere. Don’t know what the spiders found to eat in there but they appeared to be quite healthy. The boxes contained fuel pumps, magnetos and many other different unidentifiable mechanical devices. We just couldn’t let this stuff be thrown in the trash. Just couldn’t. We loaded up the trunk of the Studebaker until the trunk lid would barely close. The Studebaker wouldn’t move. The clutch slipped badly. (The rear main oil seal on the engine leaked oil onto the clutch and had to be replaced yearly). With Dave pushing and rocking the car back and forth (the ground was all soft sand) we got the car out and went home with our “saved” treasures. When we got home our church Pastor was visiting and he and dad helped Dave and I unload the trunk. Just before we left the museum for home we went behind an adjacent building and some old cars in fair to poor condition were parked outside. One was an early 1930s Rolls Royce convertible or roadster with the spare tires mounted in front of the rear wheels (interesting!!) in a concealed compartment. There was a 1934 Packard V12 Phaeton and a 1936? Packard convertible. There was a ‘37? Tatra which looked like a giant VW bug. (Incidently, Tatra, made in Czechoslovakia, sued VW in the late 1930s for copying their body and rear engine design. Adolph Hitler told Tatra to shut up. They did. In the 1960s VW was sued again for patent infringement. Look up Tatra sues VW, it's an interesting read.) A week or so later we decided to go back to the museum and “save” some more stuff. I made up a list of items we should take with us: gloves (because of the spiders and dirt), tow chain (because the clutch still slipped), jumper cables (because the battery didn’t always hold a charge), flashlight (because the room was poorly illuminated), some basic tools (just in case the Studebaker needed help). On July 4th (holiday, didn’t have to go to work) we went back to the museum. The two Packards and Rolls Royce were gone and someone took a bulldozer and shaved the body off the Tatra leaving only the frame, axles and engine. We went inside the back door again. Loaded up the car trunk again. Inside the building there was a beautiful 1914? American LaFrance fire engine sitting there. The hood was warm as apparently it was used in a local 4th of July parade then brought in here and parked. Well, I climbed up onto the drivers seat to see what it was like to sit on an old fire engine. Suddenly, the adjacent garage door rolled up and the Cucamonga police department was standing there!!! Dave and I went to jail, charged with burglary, trespassing, unauthorized removal of mechanical devices and attempted Grand Theft Fire Engine. The police thought we were professional burglars and car thieves because of the above list that I made. In jail, we couldn’t see the fire works but we could see the flashes and hear the echoes off the walls. The police called my parents who were at a big party at DeWald Dance studio in Alhambra, CA. The police recommended that we spend the night in jail to reflect on what we had done and what our future might be. Our parents agreed. The following day we went to court. I don’t remember how we pleaded but we were given a one year suspended sentence (because neither Dave nor I had any police record and the fire engine was re-classified as “assembled junk”) but we had to return all of the “saved” mechanical devices, visit the court once a month and violate no law for a year. We completed that with no problem so the judge had our police record expunged. The judge suggested that I eliminate Dave as a friend but we have been life long friends and haven’t “saved” any further car parts from the trash. I have been told that not too long after this incident that the city ordered the Kings of the Road building to be demolished as they are tired of the numerous problems being associated with it. That location is now a shopping center. Sometime in the 1970s I saw the Rolls Royce parked on the east side of a Standard gas station on the north side of Interstate 10 in Arizona. It looked like it might have been operational. I think about that Cadillac every so often and wonder where it is today. Al B
    4 points
  4. Just finished up the roof. Now to finish up a little machining for a friend.
    4 points
  5. At the BOD meeting last evening Kevin Kinney was appointed to replace John Steed as BCA Chief Judge. Roberta Vasilow was appointed Chapter, Region and Director CoOrdinator . Both appointments will be for a five year period as per the BCA ByLaws. The changes proposed by the SOP committee were approved with modifications as presented , and will be posted in a future Bugle for the membership to comment on , before being implemented. A Finance committee was created by President John Steed with Bill Stoneberg as Chair and Sydney Meyer and Jerry Courson as members. A Membership growth Committee was established by President Steed with Alan Oldfield as Chair. Members will be approved for this committee going forward. Several names have been put forth. A six month budget was approved so that the BCA can switch from a July 1 fiscal year beginning to a Jan 1 beginning. The paper work to accomplish this has been provided to our accounting firm. More detail on the BOD will be provided on the BOD meeting in upcoming minutes.
    4 points
  6. Nice car! The deletion of the continental kit will be a big improvement.
    3 points
  7. Unbolt everything you do not want and put the bumper back on the car. Cut exhaust to length. List continental kit for sale. Enjoy cold adult beverage. Should only take a few hours. Spray the bolts with PB Blaster the day before.
    3 points
  8. The silverbacks here will tell you those care are worthless since it would cost more to restore them than what they would sell for when done. "Beware the Philistine who knows the price of everything but the value of nothing".
    3 points
  9. Please don’t hate me because I’m Buickful, but here’s my other 21. It was too sweet to pass up. Had a great time driving through upstate New York to close the deal. 1980’s restoration in great condition. Giddily awaiting its arrival!
    3 points
  10. Attached is a photo of the metal bracket which holds the rear of the hood at the center pivot. Kevin Roner made this part for me as mine was missing. I have since found an original - rusty one- for reference. What I noticed during hood installation was that the factory hood fit at the rear was rather poor. Too much gap between the rear of the hood and the cowl trim. I had to put an S shape into the hood pivot to allow me to move the hood back further and get a really good looking hood line. This photo shows the added bend that I put into the bracket. About a 1/8" bend. The bent bracket on the left. The original flat bracket on the right. A note about fitting the hood. It is easier to fit the top of the hood first without the louvers. After the top fit is good, install the side louvers using a slightly smaller sized wire in the hinge for the louvers. Once all the parts look good, replace the side louver wire with the correct size. Hugh
    3 points
  11. It's a nice piece of automobilia, but I don't believe it's specific to any particular automobile. In my opinion it is a photo-prop. It was common in tourist areas, particularly beach-front locations, to have your photo taken with an automobile in the background-especially so for people who did not actually own an automobile. I have a number of such prop-photos in my postcard collection that show a variety of fake cars. In some cases, actual non-running cars were used, with a painted canvas background. In other cases, a painted car on canvas (or wood) was used with potted plants, etc in the background. I've seen cars completely mocked up from wood using car parts like windshield, steering wheel, fenders and side lamps. Sometimes people in the photo were sitting in a mock-up of the car, and sometimes they were simply standing with it or behind it as if they had just completed a drive. Postcards were produced so you could mail them back home to show everyone what a great time you had on your vacation. The piece you have is rather crudely done, and in many ways resembles more of a "cartoonish" type of car rather than a specific model. For that reason I think it is a photo-prop rather than an advertising piece. Terry
    3 points
  12. That is not entirely true that the side molding was not available in 71. I had placed my order for my 71GS the last week of March. A few weeks later in April, the owner of the Buick dealer called me and asked me to stop in. He showed me a promotional picture from Buick that showed the side molding that had just became available. He asked me if wanted to see if they could add it to my 71. I said yes. A week later, the dealer called me and said that my car was in production and it was too late to add. Another mid year change was the medium gold vinyl top that had become available in February 71, which mine has. Only 456 71 Riv's left the factory with the medium gold vinyl top. I do not know how many had the side molding. Bob Bonto
    3 points
  13. The finished product. I'm also happy with the new cables as the post lugs are much smaller and I had a fear of the positive grounding out on the cover. Best $100 spent! Install new 2/0 cable. It was longer than I liked at first, but considering all the linkages and moving parts it worked out quite well. Doesn't hang too low either.
    3 points
  14. Without a doubt, this is one of the very best restored Improved Ford Tourings anywhere in the world. A comprehensive and exhaustive, no expense spared, frame-up restoration from a rust free, Virginia car was completed over the course of five years. The effort resulted in an AACA Senior Grand National award, with multiple repeat-preservation awards, most recently at the Auburn AACA Grand National, June 2019. The car was the winner of the MTFCI 2006 Stynowski award for most meritorious restoration of the year, multiple Concours class awards including Meadowbrook Concours, Willistead Concours, Greenfield Village Old Car Festival (first place 3 years in a row) and Best of Show at the Hoosier Auto Show. This car appeared on the cover of the Model T Times and Antique Automobile with accompanying feature articles. Nothing but the best work was done as evidenced by a Sandy McTavish engine rebuild, Coil Doctor coils, Mark Eyre paintwork, Gord Koll woodwork, Mark Larder upholstery, nickel by QualKrom and much more. This is a car that runs and drives even better than it looks. It has always been fastidiously maintained so it needs absolutely nothing cosmetically or mechanically. You can drive and/or show it anywhere with pride. No disappointments. I am reluctantly offering the car for sale only because another project is calling my name. Loudly. I am now asking one third of my investment. The new price of $16,500 is a deal. Trust me, this is probably the cheapest ticket to a place on an AACA Grand National show field for a four wheeled vehicle available today. I have many more photos available that I can e-mail upon request. The car is located about 10 miles off highway I-94 so seeing the car is easy on, easy off. I am glad to answer any questions. Eric Macleod 269-420-3852. ewmacleod@hotmail.com
    2 points
  15. I remember when it was like that. Something has changed.... Mine seem to have got heavier over time.
    2 points
  16. Rebuild what you have. The many times I replaced with a reconditioned carb off the shelf that did not work well I lost count. Concerning hesitation, I can attest to my rebuilding of the Rochester on the 1960. The only item internally I replaced was the accelerator pump. I used a can of carb cleaner to clean it up. Sprayed in the various orifices, etc. I assured the floats were set as they should be. I put the top back on with new gasket. My rough idle is gone. The best part, the hesitation was gone as well. Entirely new running condition for the better.
    2 points
  17. Thanks Mike, but for the most part it is JZRIV getting the pictures loaded onto the gallery. Sure, with maybe a "little" help, but it is all Jason loading them. We, I say that even though it is mostly Jason, are still adding pictures, he was going to add a post when they are all loaded and captioned.
    2 points
  18. Thanks to @Ray_Knott , @Rivman, and others for getting the meet pictures posted on the ROA site 2019 Meet Photo Gallery and for posting the list of class/category winners.
    2 points
  19. PayPal gives you some protection in case a transactions goes sour. At least you stand a chance of getting your money put back in your PayPal account if you can prove you were cheated. Bitcoin on the other hand is like sending cash in an envelope to a P.O. Box and hoping you get something in return. Scammers love Bitcoin because there is no chance of getting the money back or knowing for certain who got the money. I won't use it.
    2 points
  20. Translated in the metric system, it's about 0.12mm "wobble" . I'm wondering how precise those assemblies were when new. Anyway, I appreciate all the work you are doing on that machine.
    2 points
  21. Amazingly, the trunk is COMPLETELY empty. THAT was a surprise.
    2 points
  22. Just funning ya. A bunch of bored old guys hang out here.
    2 points
  23. The front bumper looks great! I see you did highlight the bracket faces like mine. I chose not to have mine plated because the steel plates were so very wavy. They must have looked pretty crappy even when new. I would have probably spent another several hundred dollars just getting them smooth enough to plate. For my work in progress driver the powder coating is fine for me.
    2 points
  24. lancemb Such is the state of the former now dead restoration culture and hobby in the United States. 10 to 15 years ago this car, in this condition in a far away place like Montana still would have garnered $3000 in my opinion. (I know, I was buying and selling projects hot and heavy in those years) Now people truly pause and reflect on if they have the time, space and bucketloads of cash to bring a car back to life. It's not just that we know that a fully restored 56 Roadmaster 2 door hardtop might top out at $35,000 to $40,000 and it would take more than that to correctly restore, some people might still "go for it." It's the time it takes not seen as much of a leisure pursuit as in the past, and the extreme cost of chrome , interior fabrics and lack of special artisans to redo that interior. The Roadmaster 2 door hardtops of the 1950's are awesome cars, virtually every year presents a beautiful alternative to convertibles with fifties nostalgic flair. I suspect they are sought out at National meets and regionals. Certainly nothing against 4 door models, I love those too, but there is a mysticism about 50's 2 door hardtops in my opinion. There was a seller in Cheyenne Wyoming I followed for 2 + years on CL that had a similar 1955 Roadmaster 2 door HT. $3500 take it or leave it. No motor. No sale all those years. For me in Des Moines, with that being an odd shipping lane, it would likely add $2000 to my purchase of this car. We all want to see them saved, but the reality is going forward, the gene pool of what is out there is likely "it", except for a very few - going forward.
    2 points
  25. Nickel plated rims are more durable and also look correct when they are not polished after plating.
    2 points
  26. I really like these, bought a set of 4 at a moving sale for $100.
    2 points
  27. 2 points
  28. JBuick, You have some very nice Buicks. Regarding wheels, Here is a photo of an original 1925 Buick wheel. Nuts are Heavy Hex fine thread. Still available. They take a 3/4" socket. Originally they would have been black oxide. Wheel Wedges were black oxide. Rims were zinc or cadmium plated. center of the hubcap was body color. wheel pinstripe is as shown. Black oxide is not a very durable finish. I had my lug nuts and wedges powder coated "black satin". I use a plastic insert in the next size up socket to protect the finish. Mac's Ford carries the plastic socket protectors. zinc or cadmium plating is also not real durable long term. It has a tendency to get splotchy over time and is difficult to get the even shine back. Most people paint their rims Silver if they are looking for the original look. Hugh https://www.macsautoparts.com/ford_model_a/lug-nut-protectors-nylon-two-sizes-365045.html
    2 points
  29. You’ll find the original the day after you find and buy a replacement. With the help of my ever patient wife, we inventoried every part for my 32DL, made a detailed list and packed everything in plastic containers. It all started when I couldn’t find one of my metal ribbed headlight connectors. As we went through everything, it still wasn’t showing up. Then I pulled out each empty shelf and there it was resting on the edge of the concrete garage foundation. It had fallen off the back of one of the shelves. I hope you have success - believe me, I feel your pain!
    2 points
  30. I finally found a new bargain for the day for the New Be. Ok it's not exactly one that will quicken the heart or that many will lust after but looks like a pretty clean priginal car by the small interior details and $3000 OBO is about as cheap as they come even with 4 doors. Look at how clean the dash looks and the front passenger compartment. Might be a survivor. Looks like the original floor matt. Chrome looks pretty good as well. https://newjersey.craigslist.org/cto/d/1950-ford-custom-sedan/6930004323.html 1950 FORD CUSTOM SEDAN - $3000 (cliffside park) I am selling my Ford Custom. It is a 1950 sedan. It was built in Edgewater, New Jersey. It houses a V8 239ci engine and a manual transmission. It has 48,321 miles. I took some pictures to show you guys. I am motivated to sell and open to offers. Please call or text if interested.
    2 points
  31. padgett, this is a stock "hi-torque" 327 truck engine. Pretty sure it didn't require any special fuel back then. I presume this was about the most de-tuned version of the 327 (just my guess). Definitely not a Corvette motor. The says there were two 327 versions for trucks, one (185 hp) at 8.0:1 compression and another (225 hp) at 8.5:1 compression. I believe mine is the 225 hp version from what I'm seeing in the literature. Looks like the 185 hp version was used in larger straight trucks. The "Turbo-Fire" 327, by comparison, had a 10.5:1 compression ratio. Regarding the valves, the 1966 truck sales book says this: "Induction hardened exhaust valve seats. Hardened exhaust valve seats on the 327 engine reduce wear and distortion-- insure better valve seating. "High alloy steel inlet valves. Tough high alloy gives extra durability. Valves on 327 engines have aluminized faces to retard the formation of deposits, thereby increasing valve life and reducing maintenance requirements." "Long life exhaust valves. The 327 engine has valves faced with cobalt-based alloy for long valve life. Aluminized head retards build up of deposits and chrome plated stem reduces scuffing and wear. Aluminized valve faces on the 283 engine with applications in the 50 series trucks slow the formation of deposits, keep valves cleaner and longer-lived." "Hydraulic valve lifters, both inlet and exhaust."
    2 points
  32. Tonite's offering There is not much like a big car from this era! Just a wonderful driver!
    2 points
  33. AKA THE 3 position switch....dim, flicker and off......
    2 points
  34. Just a friend we met at the fireworks the other night. Told him about the club, I hope he joins. Great family and a beautiful car.
    2 points
  35. You wouldn't have thought so if you'd been in the shop today. I made a couple of bone-head errors. Fortunately, nothing I can't fix but I spent much of the day on the water outlet tube and now have to make it all over.
    2 points
  36. The idle speed for these straight 8's are 365 - 385 rpm. When I pick up the idle I get in the mid 7's like you mention.
    2 points
  37. Now THAT'S what I'm talking about! Went for a short cruise on a hot day. Excuse my electrical ignorance but, does moving to heavier cables and extra ground help charging as well as hot starts? I swear the gauge is acting different. When I take off from a stop it goes heavy in the charge zone. While cruising it actually sits half to a needles worth in the charge zone. It never did this before. Restarts are waaay faster and stronger. What I would expect. I have to admit, I always thought I had "sufficient" sized cables that came with the car. I see now the PO before me just bought regular battery cables from a retail store. Whether this is all my imagination and helps the issue or not, I'm happy knowing I've given the electrical the best it wants. Also want to admit even though I'm a back yard mechanic, I've never used dielectric grease even though I always make sure connections are clean. Thanks to everyone for egging me on to do this! to clean contact area at starter finish with dieletric likewise at frame
    2 points
  38. Depending on other problems one of the things I have done in the past is to add a drop of solder onto the bulb tips, usually both for tail/signal/brakes. Then you can use a file to make the tips the correct depth for your needs. Tom T.
    2 points
  39. A.J. Prior to 1925, W-K were four cylinder, lower-middle-priced cars.. In an effort to capitalize on the rising apparent prosperity, they added the six cylinder 236.4 ci Model 66 126" wb priced around $2K. This held through the 1927 66A even as the prices rose. For 1928-'29, it was designated Great Six 66A, the bore increased for 255 ci. and a 135" wb model added. These were competition for Studebaker President FA/FB, Auburn 88/115, Graham-Paige 629/827, Kissel 8-80, Hupmobile E-3/Century 125, Gardner 8-90/8-90, basically all those heretofore medium-priced makes taking a run at the entry-level 'luxury' segment. For 1930-'31, it became Model 66B, reduced only to a five body style 120" wb line, priced uniformly at $1,895. Best of all, it received that elegant styling by Amos Northup of Murray Corporation, which didn't last long. W-O was experiencing the affects of the Depression, restyled it into the 66D during '31, carried through '32 and petered out as a 66E sedan only for 1933. Like all small producers, W-O was generating new model lines during 1931'32 like mad to try and capture more sales. Even went so far as to offer the Continental-engine Willys 8-80 as a bid for eight cylinder buyers. W-O had acquired Stearns-Knight in late 1925 as its prestige line. Turned out Stearns-Knight was an archaic, terribly inefficient operation, a money pit for W-O to keep alive. In addition to their six, the Model G-8 sleeve-valve straight eight was added for 1928, becoming the Model H 137" wb and Model J 145" wb in the $5,500 range. But, among the most obscure of the obscure are the 1929 M-6-80, 126" wb and N-6-80, 134" wb, 255 ci six, sound familiar? At $2,500-$2,900, these were not much more than badge-engineered, restyled 66A, maybe with nicer appointment. It was all for naught, Stearns-Knight shut down at the end of 1929. This is my analysis from reading the spec's and Standard Catalog of American Cars 180-1942, edited by Kimes and Clark. A great Stearns-Knight article by Dr. Robert Ebert in the Automotive History Review by the Society of Automotive Historians informs this synopsis. Steve
    1 point
  40. DO NOT hit it with a hammer - though I think you're just kidding there. I was expecting about .020 runout so I don't think you are far off. Do we have any idea how straight it was to begin with? With the rivets loose you could have been getting a false reading... a few thousandths isn't much. I didn't think of this before but did you put the flange back in so the exact same holes lined up? Probably the flywheels were faced off after the flange was riveted in place in order to make them true with the shaft. I don't think they would have been able to work to a tolerance so close that it could have been done any other way. So... I would take a very light facing cut on the flywheels to true them up after the bolts are securely set in place. Given the way it works, I don't think the .005 runout is critical but, looking at that picture you could start at the middle and take a light facing cut out to past the boss for the crank pin. You would just get very fine machining marks that are not concentric with the center of the hole but the face would be perpendicular to the shaft. Is there enough material to face off the heads of the bolts as well? I suspect there is but it would be hairy because you'd have to run at cast iron speeds and I don't know how the SS would cut. It may come out very rough but that could be smoothed after the fact by lapping. Do not try to mill it.... it will come out worse than it is.
    1 point
  41. I just posted this on the other thread: I started making one out of an old steel protractor that would mimic the Delco tool but then I bought a book of shop equipment for Pierce, Studebaker, and Rockne cars and found another tool. Here’s the other tool that was listed in that tool catalog, it’s a Winn Synchrometer... This unit is pretty much what was made available at that time and works well considering, but I have also been given the advice to find someone who has a distributor machine to get it set up right. My Pierce uses a Delco-Remy 660P distributor, very similar to yours, and once setup is done you go by the points breaking, which turns a light off. Setting the dial to a 90 position on the seated set of points then adjust the movable set to the 45 marks. I bought mine on eBay for $100 plus shipping without the instructions and have seen another one selling for the same price with the instructions since I got mine. A bit pricey, but I still think it is working better than the protractor I was working on...
    1 point
  42. 1 point
  43. I am pleased to hear that you also have 'bad days'. At least it proves your human!
    1 point
  44. Hugh, That is a way cool way to remove the steering wheel. You guys are something else out there. A person is never too old to stop learning. The day a person stops learning is the day that the hole is dug. Terry Wiegand South Hutchinson, Kansas
    1 point
  45. It sounds like your system is operating correctly. You will see charging while driving until the battery is fully charged, then it will gradually taper down to 0. 0 or a negative reading at idle is normal and it should pop back up once you accelerate, top off the battery, then drop back down to 0 again. Totally normal. Generators don't put out much amperage at low speeds (or high speeds) which is why everyone eventually switched to alternators. However, if your battery is healthy, it won't mind the brief periods of discharge and it should have plenty of reserves so that you never have a problem. The regulator uses points to control generator output. It's either on or off, so it modulates output by rapidly opening and closing the points depending on the amount of charging required. It will not be a linear function, so the bouncing around you are seeing is normal. If you want, you can read up on proper adjustment of the voltage regulator and make sure that's correct, plus clean the points inside the regulator, but irregular spikes like that aren't unusual during charging. The re-start problem sounds like the typical hot start problem that many 6V cars have. If you improve your grounds and make sure they're all clean, install heavy (like 00-gauge) battery cables, and perhaps add an extra ground cable from one of the mounting posts on the starter to the frame near where the battery is grounded, things should improve. As heat goes up, so does resistance, so hot starts can be a problem for cars where the electrical systems are marginal. A lot of 6V cars are running parts store 12V battery cables, which are much too small. Grounds get dirty and rusty and nobody checks them, so resistance goes up. Both are critical for a 6V system to be reliable and strong, and the fix is inexpensive and easy. Your system isn't broken, it's just a little bit neglected. Big, new cables, clean grounds, and a healthy battery will make it start every time. Good luck!
    1 point
  46. Probably my favorite car of the modern era. I once owned a 73, and I loved that car. Took a trip to Wyoming, and drove 55 mph to conserve fuel. She got 14.8 mpg. On the return trip, I kicked her up to 85 mph and set the cruise. Lots of open road in Wyoming. Gas mileage at 85 mph ? 14.8 mpg. That big ol 455 was still loafing !
    1 point
  47. Yes, it's an engine serial number, which was used as the VIN by many states back in the day. Looks like a previous owner didn't know it was the engine serial number and stamped it on a tag. Not the first time I've seen someone do that because they were unaware it was the engine serial number. Also possible that they swapped engines and discovered that the old engine serial number was used as the VIN only after they made the swap and then made a tag to match the title. It would be good to check the engine serial number of the engine currently in the car. 43526823 4 = Series 40/Special 3526823 = sequential number, range for 1938 was 3,396,937 to 3,572,651
    1 point
  48. In 1966 Cadillac offered them as an option, not standard. 1967 They became standard equip. I just installed a GM NOS 4-way on mine. Truly plug and play. Even the location was marked on the back of the panel. Wiring harness plugs in between the signal switch and harness. Hardest part was fitting it in the plethora of wires and such (especially the cruise control).
    1 point
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