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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/01/2019 in all areas

  1. Left early Sat morning for my oldest son's in Marlin, SW of Waco. Couple pics of the quite, pleasant view. Ben
    4 points
  2. The corn head grease when used in a combine corn head does heat up and flow due to the gear drives in each corn head churning it, a lot. Like a mixer. Now with that said, you have a built in steering gearbox heater on every all left hand drive 1920s Buicks called the exhaust take down. This should warm the box enough on a good length trip to get the corn head grease to flow back to the bottom of the unit. Buick Engineers think of everything!
    3 points
  3. WINDSHIELDS Windshields of vehicles within each group will interchange with each other. 40/60/100 SERIES GRP I 1954-1956 46R & 66R Riv Cpe, 46C, 66C and 100 Conv 1955-1956 43 & 63 4 dr Riv sdn 1954-1956 Olds Holiday Cpe; conv 1955-1956 Olds Holiday sdn GRP II 1954-1956 48 & 48D 2 dr sdn 1954-1955 61 4 dr sdn 1954-1956 41 & 41D 4 dr sdn 1954-1956 49,69 Est wagon 1954-1956 Olds S88 & 98 4dr sdn exc Holiday 1954-1956 Olds 88 4 dr sedan exc Holiday 1955-1956 Olds S88 & 88 2 dr sdn 50/70 SERIES GRP III Early 1954 50 & 70 Conv 1954-1956 56R, 76R, 76RX Riv Cpe Late 1954-1956 56C & 76C Conv 1956 53 & 73 4 dr Riv sdn 1954-1956 Cadillac 62 Cpe exc Conv Early 1954 Cadillac Conv Late 1954-1956 Cadillac Conv 1956 Cacillac 62 4 dr HT GRP IV 1954 52,72R 4dr sdn 1955-1956 52 & 72 4 dr sdn 1954 Cadillac 60 & 62 4dr sdn 1954-1956 Cadillac 75 1955-1956 Cadillac 60 4 dr sadn, 62 4dr sdn BACK WINDOW Back windows *of vehicles within each group will interchange with each other. 40/60 SERIES GRP I 1955-1956 43 & 63 4 dr Riv sdn GRP II 1954-1956 46R & 66R Riv Cpe, 46C 1954-1956 Olds Holiday Cpe GRP III 1954-1956 48 & 48D 2 dr sdn 1954-1955 61 4 dr sdn 1954-1956 41 & 41D 4 dr sdn 1954-1956 Olds S88 & 98 4dr sdn exc Holiday 1954-1956 Olds 88 4 dr sedan exc Holiday 1955-1956 Olds S88 & 88 2 dr sdn 50/70 SERIES GRP IV 1954-1956 56R, 76R, 76RX Riv Cpe 1956 *53 & 73 4 dr Riv sdn 1954-1956 Cadillac 62 Cpe exc Conv 1956 Cadillac 62,4 dr HT GRP V 1954 52,72R 4 dr sdn 1954 Cadillac 60 & 62 4 dr sdn GRP VI 1955-1956 52 & 72 4 dr sdn 1955-1956 60 & 62 4dr sdn exc HT
    3 points
  4. Funny thing but don’t bet on it... I took my “new” car to a show thinking that very same thing, but 20 minutes after I arrived another Pierce pulled in and parked right next to mine! 80 to 90% of the show was post war cars, heavy on the 60’s and 70’s, and there were a few different people who commented that they had never heard of a Pierce-Arrow before and now here’s two of them... Of course, mine drew a bigger crowd... nothing like an unrestored car!
    3 points
  5. Plymouth in this era was mostly a family man’s car and most popular in 4 door models. A 1961 two door is an unusual find.
    2 points
  6. Mr Shaw does our ‘23 parts block still exist and have these pipes? Or are you going to tell me you shipped them to me and make me move two cars to get to my stash of engine goodies?
    2 points
  7. I got the fenders stripped. My sandblaster (Simpson's Metal Refinishing) turned down the air pressure and did a nice job removing the old lacquer and red primer. Some flaws were revealed, but overall not too bad. Phil
    2 points
  8. Yes a good friend has a 61 Plymouth Fury convertible, so I would agree. I do disagree on value v VW. Look at this cars early sixty vibe! Great car to consider restoring. I suspect it has that rectangular steering wheel, a space age dash, and a split front seat with a drivers side lower (or is it higher) than the passenger side.
    2 points
  9. In Pennsylvania, where antique cars are numerous, one could attend two or three different shows most week-ends. One of our region members, with his wife, attends 50 to 60 shows every season. I usually avoid shows that have street rods: The presence of street rods often means that they aren't serious shows for antiques. I'll choose shows that have a fairly large number of cars, and a wide variety, so I can see some different things. The location is always important, since it's more enjoyable to sit in a leafy green park or on the quiet, narrow streets of a historic town, rather than in a hot and featureless parking lot of a highway-interchange motel. (Photo shows one of our members on just such a quiet street.) Some community events have other activities too-- such as craft shows, book sales, an antique show-- that add to the fun.
    2 points
  10. I just think it is great that somebody like you can write posts in another language. It would be impossible for me. Unfortunately, when I was at school, here in the UK, we only learnt two languages, good English and bad English. The good English we leant in class and the bad English we learnt in the playground! Please keep up your excellent posts.
    2 points
  11. I have never thought about it before, until I read the last two posts. With our changeable weather in North Norfolk in the UK, we don't get many extremes of weather. I can work, or should that be 'play', in my garage 365 days a year. Jeff, I hope you are back on the MG soon as I have missed reading your interesting posts.
    2 points
  12. If I have the time, my car would 'fit in' with the other vehicles slated to be there and the drive isn't too horrible, I try to attend. Problem for me, is that shows for stock 20's motorcars are getting harder to find.
    2 points
  13. 2 points
  14. Landowner: “I’m gonna fix it up some day”.
    2 points
  15. Again to ALL, The chassis manual is your best friend when working on ANY vehicle. It's ALL explained probably better than I can. The ONLY caution I can give is when your installing the box OR anyone else's boxes. You have to remember this a FULL SIZE car box & it's heavy. Coming out is easier than installing so it would be advisable to have help because as I stated this steering box is HEAVY. AND it's not because it's heavy, BUT ALSO that your in tight quarters & it's awkward trying to move around while your trying to hold the box in place & getting things lined up will be just about impossible. Unless your on a lift which many of you I will assume will not. Still it's certainly easier to do with help. Next to make things neater you could clamp both hoses with a pair of needle nose vise grips to help with the oil that will come out of the hoses. Just don't clamp them too tight as all your trying to do is keep oil from dripping all over you & making it more unpleasant to work. The ONLY other thing I can say is get a "crows foot" (11/16" & 5/8") that has an end like a line wrench that you can put a long extension on to break the lines loose. After installation of the box make sure the lines are tight, again the using the crows foot to now tighten the lines. You could go to one of the auto stores that lend out tools as most I'm sure do not have a 1 5/16" socket or a pit-man arm puller. You will see a flat on the input shaft of the steering box & a flat on the coupler attached to the rag joint. With white-out or some other kind of marker (not something really wide other than a line) put a line in the middle of both flats. Get the steering wheel in a position where you can see the flat from below & the flat on the input shaft of the steering box. Use something to hold the steering wheel in that position OR whatever position you feel nec. for you to see the lines your going to be able to see from below. What this does is give you a reference to line up the two lines & the middle of both. This helps to get the twp pieces to line up exactly. IF the input shaft won't slide into the rag joint fairly easily your probably not lined up. What you DON'T want to do is force them together. IF you say the heck with it & continue number one it will be difficult to remove the improperly mated parts, But it may also be impossible to install the clamping bolt. Torque Specs Lower coupler (rag joint) pinch bolt 20-35 ft. lbs. Steering box to frame 60-75 ft. lbs. Pit-man arm nut 90-110 ft. lbs. Average time experienced 3/4 - 1 hr. " " Novis- DYI 2-3 hrs Tom T.
    2 points
  16. I just got the new gas tanks in. I only have 6 right now. I will have more towards the end of summer. I also got in new fuel sending units for non AC cars (single line). Please call me at 215-767-0845 if you are interested in a Riviera Gas Tank and/or sending unit. Thank you James
    2 points
  17. I feel your pain. Still have things to get done before the real heat starts and the monsoon season. I've come up with an idea so I can work on the car without feeling like an ant under a magnifying glass. We may be back on our projects around the same time.
    2 points
  18. Lose the wheels for a set of originals and the car would look so much better.
    2 points
  19. My Mother and I did something similar with one of my Dad's buildings fulllllll of stufffff. We had an interested buyer, we agreed on a price for it to be cleaned to the walls no cherry picking and then rented him the building for 18 months while he cleaned it out. I figure we sold for 10-20 cents on the dollar but would have taken 10 years of serious flea marketing to get full value, not what I want to do in retirement. Plus my Mother got rent on a building she wasn't using.
    2 points
  20. The seller got this backwards: So, buy this car and join the flathead club. Join the Flathead Ford Club and use all the resources of the club to buy the best car you can. I have been an impulse buyer many times, but rarely an impulse seller. Bernie
    2 points
  21. Sorry I got here late. Yes 1928 Graham-Paige 629 Town Sedan; 288 CID; 4 speed transmission.. This car has the Big Six and I believe is the ONLY remaining "Graham-Paige 629 Town Sedan". I have been watching Graham-Paige cars for the last 20 years, and have thousands of pictures of Graham cars, and personally own seven Graham cars, including my Grandfathers. So I don't say ONLY without some experience.. All of the chrome trim parts are reproduced. The problem with the 619 and 629 is they used purchased parts for the interior....let me explain. The 619 and 629 had to be upscale of the small sixes so they purchased unique interior hardware unfortunately it is near impossible to find (it is a wave pattern). On the bright side all the small six parts fit and nobody will ever know....except me (Oh yes I also own a 619 (1929, only 200 made)). The serial numbers are in two places, under the radiator on the frame and passenger side rear floor board, with a new floor most likely all three tags are gone (color, body and VIN number) most of these were registered to the engine number, something about horses. So most likely title matches the engine number, tag on the side of the engine, near the generator. The Graham-Paige production book still exists so you could possibly get the build sheet for this car. Great car to own and drive, it will cruse at 60 mph all day long, yes extra large hydraulic brakes on all wheels. Too bad seats are lost, they are all wood I could get you all the information you need to build new seats. Looks like someone has rebuilt the entire wood top/roof, and he has rebuilt the shocks. Hopefully it retained its one piece rear bumper (the only really scary part to find) if it has a two piece bumper (center missing) that means someone installed the dual side mounts, not a big deal. If you do get the Graham, plan on spending the day (more hours the better) searching the garage for parts. PM me I will get you my phone number so you can send me pictures, I will tell you if they are Graham parts or not. Anything you forget will be hard to replace, and cost you more money. I would bet most of the parts are in the garage or the house. My research shows these are optional colors, with only this example... Most likely it was Graham-Paige blue with black fenders, blue wheels. The disk wheels are great, easy to clean and usually straight. The tail light is hard to find, Nash is the same three lens, one on ebay now. Hope I answered your questions, I think I have a set of cowl lights.
    2 points
  22. There's no such a thing as bigger Ken. Once you have more room.... you just fill it up! 😅 (ask me how I know)
    2 points
  23. This a manual antenna with no numbers on it. I have owned this for about 20 years and just found it again. I am pretty sure it is Buick but do not know the year. It looks new. Any help will be appreciated. Thanks Gene.
    1 point
  24. Ford also tried again in 1998 with their 'Th!nk' city car. It didn't pan out, and they sold it to Global/NEVS in 2003. Now Ford is trying again by investing $500 into Rivian. Craig
    1 point
  25. I dont like the look. Gave one I had for a model A tudor away last week. Guy seemed to like it.
    1 point
  26. Only 25 days till the Long Island Chapter 40th annual show cant wait to see the large group of Riviera's that show up for the show its great having them as part of our show STOP BY OUR WEBSITE libuickclub.org TO REGISTER OR PRINT OUT FORM OR CHECK OUT THE PICS FROM PRIOR SHOWS SEE YOU THERE
    1 point
  27. There are used parts still available as well, but stuff like interior plastic pieces are hard to come by. Good chrome could be sourced from the Western US. Sheetmetal parts would have to be as well. Of course shipping will be the killer on many things. I don't think there is any reproduction beyond maybe rocker panels. I actually don't mind the look of them, though some people really dislike it. Of course the 70's came along as well as Pontiac raised the ugly bar again with the Aztec, so many once ugly cars look a whole lot better now.
    1 point
  28. 1974 Chevrolet Chevelle.
    1 point
  29. How about hybrids like the Owen Magnetic and my all time favorite for cool bad design the "Arctic Snow Cruiser".
    1 point
  30. You are quite the craftsman! I enjoy watching this beautiful automobile come together! Maybe for the open ends of the welting you could fabricate a decorative metal "plug" that would have sort of a "tail" on it so you could slide it into the welt and maybe with just a dot of epoxy keep it steady. Steele Rubber carries these glove box bumpers that are made with a long tail. Something along those lines may be a nice finishing touch for the open end. Keep up the beautiful work!!
    1 point
  31. I am not familiar with this engine but it appears to me that the shaft with the slotted ends (marked 2 and 3) probably drives the oil pump and therefore would have no bearing on any slop/movement in the rotor. Have you checked the distributor shaft/bushes for wear ? If not this is where I would be looking.
    1 point
  32. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Ws55UQ1Ris Published on Feb 21, 2018 A visual tour of the new and exciting Classic Auto Mall in Morgantown, PA. From early 1900s cars, barn finds, 50s classics to Ferraris and more with a sales showroom and cars consigned for sale. This is one of the largest collection of antique and classic cars in the world! Please visit www.classicautomall.com. Open to the public every Wed from 4 to 8 PM. Only open to the public this one day?
    1 point
  33. Hi John, It's a bit of a story! I found it while enquiring about a 1970 Buick Estate Wagon way back in 2015. The owner had sold the '70 but also had the '73. He wanted waaaaaaaaay too much for it though and I gave up on buying it. In the end I wound up buying a 1958 Cadillac Eldorado Seville that was already here in Australia. That put my wagon search at an end and I put the '73 Estate out of my mind. However, I stayed in touch with the owner on and off and as time rolled on, he progressively dropped his price. To cut a longer story short, by the end of 2018, I decided to sell my Cadillac and buy the Buick. The Cadillac is an amazing car but I have wanted one of these Estate Wagons since the late 90's and I figured that this example was as good as it gets. It is also the right colour - I wanted my wagon in Willow Green with woodgrain and that's what this car is. After sealing the deal with the former owner, I later realised that I actually tried to buy this very same wagon back in 2004 when it was in he hands of its third owner! I am now the fifth owner of this amazing wagon. The car was ordered through Scranton Buick PA back in May 1973 by a Charles R. Moyer of 621 Clay Avenue, Scranton. MSRP was $6,900.15 because he added a tonne of accessories to it. He kept it for many years before selling it in 2000 with just 25,000 miles on the clock. For the next 18 months, the wagon was driven another 12,000 miles by its second owner, Roger Vales, before being sold in 2001 to its third owner, Jamie Steve, who kept it for 6 years. Another 5,000 miles were added and then the car sold again in 2007 to its fourth owner, Marshall Chervin, who kept the car until I bought it in January of this year. Another 11,000 miles were added by the last owner so the odometer now reads 53,000. The wagon was located in Manchester MA when I bought it. I had it delivered to Linden NJ where it was loaded on to a container ship for its journey to Australia. We are yet to meet!! I have never seen the car in person but this wagon and I were meant to be!!! I am already amassing NOS parts for its continued care and upkeep. The last owner added a black vinyl roof to the wagon and I will be removing it first thing. Although vinyl was an option for the wagon in 1973, this car did not have one originally. It was also not done correctly because they did not cover the C pillars and that has accentuated what is already an awkward roofline. The last owner also added the factory road wheels but I think I prefer the deluxe wheel covers it came with. Yes those 71-76 GM wagons are something else. The 'clamshell' tailgate is still quite a remarkable feature. They do have somewhat of a following around the world but remarkably, they are still being derbied in the USA!
    1 point
  34. I think it was just about right.........the engine timer was missing, and a new reproduction will run you 15 grand.......plus gaskets. Only problem is there are about ten items on the car that are missing that will also cost 15k for each issue, before you start the restoration. You can probably come out even money if you are careful with the restoration costs.
    1 point
  35. Jim, the tires you listed are too large in diameter. The 820 r 15 is 29.6 inches in diameter....way too large! The tire that is best from Coker for the 63 Riviera would be their American Classic bias ply look radial in 710-15. It is exactly the correct size and has a correct one inch whitewall.
    1 point
  36. Dennis, I alerted Glenn Cecchine at CARS about this problem 2 years ago and he said he would look into it and contact their manufacturer. Obviously, he did not. Vendors have a hard time admitting they are selling the wrong part. Even Repops did not want to believe it after I sent in my original and they made me new ones. They were still trying to convince me my originals were repos that had been put in somewhere along the line and that theirs were correct. Maybe if enough people alert them to this they will believe it. Sent you a PM. Bill
    1 point
  37. Unfortunately most of the rusty junk left is just that. Take off parts from a 65 Mustang or 70 Chevelle that are readily available. Stuff like that comprised mush of what I found or old brake parts, especially boxes of shoes and linings. Old gaskets, that's what most lots were comprised of. even when they were NOS they were often damaged new parts or things that nobody needed for cars that weren't being done. I had a few , what I would call virgin hauls, that I did OK, but then again they were far from cheap. When you lay out $7500 to buy a parts lot and there is not many items worth over $100 it's a long uphill battle. The savior was ebay as I would never feel right charging a guy $500 for some obscure part that you hoped was worth $10 but he was happy to get it for $500. THat's all that saved my Bacon on many of the buys I made.
    1 point
  38. Link to side window weather strips by Steele Rubber: https://www.steelerubber.com/side-window-leading-edge-70-0759-80 No problems installing the new seals. I put a little dish soap on the seal where it slides into the chrome retainer and they slipped right into place. Steele Rubber side window seals have the metal insert in them where the ones sold by other vendors don't.
    1 point
  39. On Facebook today. The man who painted my car reflected in the hood of the one he is painting.
    1 point
  40. I found some special welding supplies that should work on any needed repairs. These are for the old fashion stick welders only not for MIG or TIG.
    1 point
  41. Holy smokes, Rob! While I agree we are all crazy, and you maybe more than some, but I don't think it's as crazy as having golf as a hobby.
    1 point
  42. For years I have been saying for every $1,000 more you are willing to pay you can get $4,000 worth of the other guy's work. Oh, the other thing, from observation I have learned to split my money pretty close to even between mechanical and cosmetic. Just in case the is a fire sale- shiny sells. Bernie
    1 point
  43. I'm surprised that you let this just sit out in the garage and get dusty. I keep mine in my living room under some classy accent lighting.
    1 point
  44. Quick Check Pull a head light, on the back it will say what voltage it is. It is most likely still 6 V positive ground. If the hearer hoses are off I would by-pass it for now. Look at the side of the engine block, a long crack is not good. Drain the oil, look for water or large metal pieces. When installing the battery make sure every thing is in the off position. If you should not have a spark when touching the last cable, mice can do a number on the old wiring.
    1 point
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